Category Archives: Kilkenny

Jerpoint Abbey, Co. Kilkenny

Jerpoint Abbey,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1837) tells us: “ABBEY-JERPOINT, a parish (anciently a corporate town), in the barony of KNOCKTOPHER, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 1 ½ mile (W. S. W.) from Thomastown; containing 367 inhabitants. This place is situated on the river Nore, and derives its name from an abbey founded here, in 1180, by Donogh O’Donoghoe, King of Ossory, for monks of the Cistertian order, whom he removed from a distant part of Ossory. It was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, and was amply endowed by the royal founder, who was interred here in 1185; and its possessions were subsequently confirmed by John, Lord of Ireland. In 1202, Felix O’Dullany, Bishop of Ossory, was interred here, at whose tomb many miracles are said to have been wrought; and the abbey became a favourite place of sepulture with all the great families in the surrounding country. “

These photographs were taken Nov 2006.

Jerpoint Abbey Gravestone photographs (some)

Grangefertagh (Fertagh) Church, Co. Kilkenny

Church and Round Tower, Grangefertagh (Fertagh), Co. Kilkenny, Ireland. I was talking to two different sets of people last week and they asked me had I ‘done’ “Fertagh” and I said that I didn’t think I had.  “Is it beside that Round Tower on the back road from Galmoy to the Johnstown Road – and if it was, then I had a notion I had done that even though I was saying I didn’t think I had.  It’s actually very easy to forget how many places you’ve been, expecially when it was a case of driving around following a road on a map from one marked point to another without thinking about exactly where you are. There I was yesterday or the day before collecting a set of Kilkenny photos when I opened a file that I had called Grangefertagh and I realised that the locals call this place “Fertagh” and that yes, I had ‘done’ Fertagh. Lewis Topographical Dictionary (1837) names this area “FARTAGH, or FERTAGH, a parish, partly in the barony of CRANAGH, but chiefly in that of GALMOY, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 8 miles (S. W.) from Durrow, on the mail coach road from Athy to Cashel; containing, with the post-town of Johnstown (which is described under its own head), 3205 inhabitants.” The Church site Is actually beautiful, right out in the middle of nowhere so to speak.  Hidden from the world, peaceful. The Monastery was probably founded in the late 5th or 6th century by St. Ciaran of Saighirt. In the a Priory of Augustinian Canons regular was founded here. These photographs were taken Nov 2006.

Grangefertagh (Fertagh) Gravestone photographs

Ballyhale Roman Catholic Church, Co. Kilkenny

Roman Catholic Church,
Ballyhale,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

Of Ballyhale, Lewis Topographical Dictionary of 1837 tells us “BALLYHALE, a village, in the parish of DERRYNAHINCH, barony of KNOCKTOPHER, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 1 mile (S. by E.) from Knocktopher, on the road from Kilkenny to Waterford; containing 69 houses and 369 inhabitants. “

These photographs were taken Nov 2006.

Index to names on Gravestones, Ballyhale, Kilkenny

Ballyhale Gravestone Photographs

Ballyragget Church, Co. Kilkenny

Roman Catholic Church, Ballyragget, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland.

According to the Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1837) : “BALLYRAGGET, or DONOUGHMORE, a post-town and parish, in the barony of FASSADINING, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 8 miles (N. by W.) from Kilkenny, and 53 ¾ (S. W. by S.) from Dublin; containing 2609 inhabitants, of which number, 1629 are in the town. “

Also from Lewis “In the R. C. (Roman Catholic) divisions it is the head of a union or district, which comprises the parishes of Ballyragget, Ballyouskill, Rosconnel, and Attanagh, and parts of those of Durrow, Abbeyleix, Freshford, Burnchurch, and Kilmocar;. and contains two chapels, one at Ballyragget and one at Attanagh.”

These photographs were taken April 2014 and show that the current Church in Ballyragget was built in 1924.

The few gravestones around this church are for the Priests of the parish.  I have photographed them but they are not on this website yet.

Kilballykeeffe Church Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Church,
Kilballykeeffe,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

These photographs were taken April 2009.

Dunmore Church of Ireland Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Church of Ireland,
Dunmore,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

These photographs were taken Jan 2006. Dunmore Church of Ireland Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Dunmore Gravestone photographs

According to the Lewis Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837 “The church is a plain building, recently repaired by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, at an expense of £114. “

Cuffesgrange Church Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Roman Catholic Church,
Cuffesgrange,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

These photographs were taken July 2008. Cuffesgrange Church Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Johnstown Church of Ireland Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Church of Ireland,
Johnstown,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

These photographs were taken August 2013.

I have recorded the gravestones but they have not been indexed yet

Castleinch or Inchy Church Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Castleinch or Inchy,
Co. Kilkenny,
Ireland.

Photographs taken April 2009

This one was very sad in some ways.  It was all in very bad nick and I’ve left photos in to show the state of the roof etc, but, there was a man or family buried in the church.  He may have been a Lord or someone of that level in society.  I’d have to go back to my inscriptions or photographs to find out what his status was.

I find that lots of times, someone who would have been of importance in the social structure of things buried and forgotten and the memorial all desolate looking.

Just like my Mam used to say, the only thing we can be sure of is that we’ll die – and when we die, we can’t take what we have with us.

Kilmanagh Church Photographs, Co. Kilkenny

Kilmanagh,

Co. Kilkenny,

Ireland.

These photographs were taken July 2007.

I’ve included a few gravestone photographs, the gravestones here were really wild and lost looking, covered in lichens and moss.  Some talk about the ecology of a graveyard, I read this being said all the time and I am a Scientist, but ivy covered stones do nothing for me!