Category Archives: Antrim

Books About Co. Antrim

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The following are a list of book titles relating to Co. Antrim. The topics are varied: history, heritage, genealogy, language and some tourist guides. Some of these may be easily obtainable, some are rare and out of print. Some are books and some pamphlets.

You can never find a book if you do not have a title to work with, once you have a title then you can search through on-line library catalogues or make an enquiry of your local library as to whether they partake in inter-library loan and if they can obtain a copy of a book for you from some other library. You can watch the item lists of auction houses, or those on inter-net auction sites. You can also contact book-sellers to find if they have a copy of the book should you be interested in purchasing it.

This list is arranged alphabetically by author. For the most part the publisher and year of publication are also included. You can use your browser to search for a particular word or you can read through the list. It is hoped to add to this list of books from time to time.

For these entries the highlighted name is usually the author, then, the name of the book. Followed by theh place of publication and sometimes the publisher, then the year of publication.

Ahoghill. – Pt.1 : Buick’s Ahoghill / edited by Eull Dunlop. – Ballymena : Mid-Antrim Historical Group, 1987
Akenson, Donald Harman. – Between two revolutions : Islandmagee, County Antrim 1798-1920. – Port Credit (Ont.) : Meaney; Dublin; Distributed by the Academy Press, 1979
A Letter from a Freeholder of the County of Catherlaugh, to the Freeholders of the county of Antrim – Catherlaugh : n.p.], 1725.
Antrim Poor Law Union. – The great famine in Antrim, Randalstown and districts : extracts from the minutes. – [Belfast] : Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, 1972
Atkinson, A, Esq. – Ireland exhibited to England :in a political and moral survey of her population, and in a statistical and scenographic tour of certain districts; comprehending specimens of her colonisation, natural history and antiquities, arts, sciences, and commerce … With a letter to the members of His Majesty’s government on the state of Ireland. London:Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy,1823
A Full and correct report of the debates, at the Catholic meeting, held in Francis-Street Chapel, Dublin, on the ninth of April, 1795 :with the resolutions, at full lenth. ; To which is added, Mr. Teeling’s speech, at the late Co. Antrim Catholic meeting . – Belfast : Printed at the Northern Star-Office, 1795.

Bannerman, John. – Studies in the history of Dalriada. – Edinburgh : Scottish Academic Press; London; Distributed by Chatto and Windu, 1974
Ballymacarrett Research Group. – Lagan enclave : a history of conflict in the Short Strand 1886-1997 / Ballymacarrett Research Group, 1997- Belfast :
Barr, W.N. The oldest register of Derryaghy, Co. Antrim, 1695-1772
Bassett, George Henry. – County Antrim 100 years ago : a guide and directory 1888. – Belfast : Friar’s Bush, 1989
Book of Antrim.County Antrim 100 years ago : a guide and directory 1888 Originally published: as The book of Antrim. Dublin : Sealy, Bryers and Walker, 1888.
Brett, C. E. B., Charles Edward Bainbridge, 1928-. – Buildings of County Antrim / by C E B Brett / with photographs Belfast : Belfast:A joint publication of the Ulster Architectural Heritage Society and the Ulster Historical Foundation,1996
Boyd, Hugh Alexander. – Rathlin Island, North of Antrim / by Hugh Alexander Boyd. – Ballycastle, Northern Ireland : Scarlett, 1947
Belfast Naturalists’ Field Club. – Belfast 1902 : a guide to Belfast and the counties of Down & Antrim / prepar. – Belfast : M’Caw, Stevenson & Orr, 1902.
Boyd, James, fl. 1891. – Boyd’s pictorial guide to Larne and the Antrim coast : from Belfast to the G. – Larne : James Boyd, 1891
Belfast Naturalists’ Field Club. – Guide to Belfast and the adjacent counties / by the Belfast Naturalists’ Fie. – Belfast : Pub. for the Club by M. Ward & co, 1874.
Boyd, James, firm. – Boyd’s pictorial guide to Portrush, the Giant’s causeway, and the Antrim coast. – Larne : James Boyd, 1895
Benn, George. A History of the town of Belfast. London 1877-80
Boyd, H.A. A History of the Church of Ireland in Ramoan Parish. 1930

Cole, Grenville A. J (Grenville Arthur James), 1859-1924. – Scenery and geology in County Antrim . Belfast : R. Carswell, 1895.
Collins, A. E. P.. – Dooey’s cairn, Ballymacaldrack, County Antrim
Collins, A. E. P.. – Excavations on Ballygalley Hill, County Antrim

Dallat, Cahal. – Antrim coast & glens : a personal view. Belfast : HMSO, 1990. – (Countryside and wildlife interpretation series).
Day, Angelique. – Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland : v. 2, Parishes of County Antrim, Pt. 1, 1838-39. – Queen’s Univ.,Inst.of Irish Studs., 90. v. 2, Parishes of County Antrim, Pt. 1, 1838-39 1990
Dickson, Charles. – Revolt in the North : Antrim and Down in 1798 / Charles Dickson. – London : Constable, 1997
Dickson, Charles. – Revolt in the North : Antrim and Down in 1798. – Dublin : Clonmore & Reynolds; London; Burns, Oates & Washbourne, 1960
Donnelly, Maureen. – The nine Glens : a personal look at the history, folklore, and poetry of the. – [2d ed.]. – [Downpatrick, Ire : Donnelly, 1975
Donaghy, John Lyle. – The flute over the valley : Antrim song. – Omagh : Printed for the Inver Press, Larne by S.D. Montgomery, 1931
Dubourdieu, John. – Statistical survey of the county of Antrim : with observations on the means of improvement; drawn up for the … Dublin Society Publ. . – Dublin : Graisbery & Campbell, 1812

Ewart, L.M. Handbook of the Dioceses of Down, Connor & Dromore.

Foy, R. H.. – Remembering all the Orrs : the story of the Orr families of Antrim and their. – Belfast : Ulster Historical Foundation [in association with Antrim and Distr, 1999.

Geological Survey of Ireland. – Explore South Antrim. – Dublin : GSI, 2000
Gravestone inscriptions : County Antrim. – Vol 3 : Old families of Carrickfergus & Ballynure from gravestone inscriptions. – Belfast : Ulster Historical Foundation, 1995. –
Gwynn, Stephen Lucius, 1864-1950. – Highways and byways in Donegal and Antrim / with illustra. – London : Macmillan and Co. limited; New York : The Macmillan Company, 1899
Griffith, Sir, Richard, 1784-1878. – Geological and mining surveys of the coal districts of the counties of Tyrone and Antrim, in Ireland. – Dublin : R. Graisberry, printer to the Royal Dublin Society, 1829

Hamond, Fred. – Antrim coast & glens : industrial heritage – Belfast : H.M.S.O., 1991.
Heads and hearths :the hearth money rolls and poll tax returns for Co. Antrim 1660-69 /edited by S. T. Carleton – [Belfast] : [Public Record Office of Northern Ireland], 1991.
Hill, G.. – MacDonnells of Antrim
Hill, George, Rev. Montgomery Manuscripts 1603-1706. Belfast, 1869
Herity, Michael. – The ‘Larne’ material in Lord Antrim’s collection at the Ashmolean Museum, Ox. – Dublin : R.I.A, 1968. – (Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy ; Vol. 67, Sect. C, No. 2).
Hanna, Denis O’D. – The face of Ulster : Antrim, Londonderry, Fermanagh, Tyrone, Armagh, Monaghan. – London; New York : Batsford, 1952. – (The Face of Britain).
Holmer, Nils Magnus, 1904-. – The Irish language in Rathlin Island, Co. Antrim – Dublin : Hodges, Figgis, 1942
Hamilton, William, 1755-1797. – Letters concerning the northern coast of the county of Antrim :Containing a natural history of its basaltes: with an account of such circumstances as are worthy of notice respecting the antiquities, manners, and customs, of that country. In these letters is stated a plain and impartial view of the volcanic theory of the basaltes /By the Rev. William Hamilton Dublin:L. White,1786
Hamilton, William, 1755-1797 Letters concerning the northern coast of the county of Antrim :containing observations on the antiquities, manners, and customs of that country. With the natural history of the basaltes, illustrated by an accurate map of the county of Antrim. And views of the most interesting objects on the coast /By the Rev. W. Hamilton, D.D. & M.R.I.A., in two parts
This edition is enriched by a memoir of the author and an itinerary and guide to the Giants’ Causeway
Belfast:Printed for Simms and M’Intyre:[by T. Mairs & Co.],1822

Joy, Henry. Historical Collections relative to the town of Belfast. Belfast, 1817

Lee, W.H.A., Rev. St. Colmanell, Aghoghill: A History of its parish, 1865
Lynn, W. H. – Notes on the ruins of Dunluce Castle, county of Antrim : with explanation. – Belfast : M’Caw, Stevenson & Orr, Limited, The Linenhall Press, 1905.
Londonderry, County, Library. – The north coast, Antrim and Londonderry / comp. by Philip Reid and Keith Bur. – [Coleraine, 1972.

Marshall, H.C., Rev. The Parish of Lambeg. 1933
McComb, William, 1793-1873. – M’Comb’s guide to Belfast : the Giant’s Causeway and adjoining districts of. – [East Ardsley; Wakefield, Eng.] : S.R. Publishers, 1970.
MacConaill, Michael A. – ‘The people of Rachrai’ (Rathlin Island, Co. Antrim) / Michael A. MacConaill. – Belfast : The Northern Whig, Ltd, 1925. –
McSkimin, Samuel, 1774?-1843. – The history and antiquities of the county of the town of Carrickfergus, from the earliest records to the present time: also a statistical survey of said county Belfast:printed by J. Smyth,1823 Second edition; with large additions, and a copious appendix. –

Mallory, J. P.. – Trial excavations at Tievebulliagh, Co. Antrim / by J. P. Mallory.
McCahan, Robert. – M’Cahan’s local histories : a series of pamphlets on north Antrim and the G. – Cushendall : Glens of Antrim Historical Society, 1988.
M’Cahan’s local histories :a series of pamphlets on north Antrim and the Glens (1923) /compiled by Cahal Dalat
Cushendall:Glens of Antrim Historical Society,1988
McDonnell, Hector, 1947-. – The Wild Geese of the Antrim MacDonnells / Hector McDonnell. – Dublin : Irish Academic Press, 1996
McWilliams, Hugh, b. ca 1783. – Songs of Hugh McWilliams, schoolmaster, 1831 (born: Glenavy,Co. Antrim, c178. – Portrush : Ulstersongs, 1993 Pamphlet
M’Sparran, Archibald, 1786?-1848. – The Irish legend of the M’Donnell and the Norman de Borgos. – Limavady : North-WestBooks, 1986.
McNeill, T. E. – Carrickfergus Castle, county Antrim / T. E. McNeill. – Belfast : Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1981. – (Northern Ireland archaeological monographs ; no. 1).
McSparran, Malachy. – Oh maybe it was yesterday : glimpses of the Glens of Antrim from early photo. – [Northern Ireland] : Glens of Antrim Historical Society, 1980.
Millen, S. S. Sidelights on Belfast History. 1932
Mullin, Julia. A History of Dunluce Presbyterian Church

O’NEILL, M.. – Songs of the Glens of Antrim
Ordnance Survey of Ireland. – :a description compiled as part of the field survey for the first edition of the six inch Ordnance Survey maps and / edited and illustrated by James Boyle of the Ordnance Survey, 1838 ; with an introd. to the Ordnance Survey parish memoirs, 1830-40 by Brian Trainor [Belfast]:Northern Ireland Public Record Office,1969

Ordnance Survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day and Patrick McW. – Vol.2 : Parishes of County Antrim. – [part] 1, 1838-9 : Ballymartin, Ballyro. – Belfast : Institute of Irish
Vol.2, [part] 1, 1838-9,Parishes of County Antrim Ballymartin, Ballyrobert, Ballywalter 1990

Ordnance survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day and Patrick McW. – vol.10 : Parishes of County Antrim. – III : 1833,1835,1839-40 : Larne and Island Magee 1991 Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland, Vol. 10: Parishes of County Antrim III 1833, 1835, 1839-40, Larne & Island Magee
Ordnance survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day and Patrick McW. – Vol.13 : Parishes of County Antrim. – IV : 1830-8 : Glens of Antrim. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies,..
Vol.13, IV,Parishes of County Antrim 1830-8 Glens of Antrim 1992
Ordnance Survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day and Patrick McW. – vol.16 : Parishes of County Antrim. – Part 5 : 1830-5, 1837-8 Giant’s Causew. – Belfast : Institute of Irish

Vol.16, Part 5,Parishes of County Antrim 1830-5, 1837-8 Giant’s Causeway and Ballymoney 1992 Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland, Vol. 16: Parishes of County Antrim V 1830-5, 1837-8, Giant’s Causeway & Ballymoney

Ordnance Survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day and Patrick McW. – Vol.19 : Parishes of County Antrim. – Belfast :Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland, Vol. 19: Parishes of County Antrim VI 1830, 1833, 1835-38, South-West Antrim
Ordnance Survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day andPatrick McWi. – Vol.21 : Parishes of Country Antrim. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies in association with The Royal Ir.. 1993
Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland, Vol. 21: Parishes of County Antrim VII 1832-8: South Antrim

Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland, Vol. 24: Parishes of County Antrim IX 1830-2, 1835, 1838-9, North Antrim Coast & Rathlin
Ordnance survey memoirs of Ireland / edited by AngéliqueDay, Patrick McWilli. – Vol.26 : Parishes of County Antrim. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies in association with the Royal Iri
Parishes of County Antrim 1830-1, 1833-5, 1839-40:East Antrim, Glynn, Inver, Kilroot and Templecorran
Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angèlique Day and Patrick McW. – Vol.29 : Parishes of County Antrim. – Part 11 : 1832-33, 1835-39, Antrim tow. – Belfast : Queen’s University..
Vol.29, Part 11,Parishes of County Antrim 1832-33, 1835-39, Antrim town and Ballyclare
Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day and Patrick McW. – Vol.32 : Parishes of County Antrim. – Belfast : Queen’s University of Belfast Institute of Irish Studies in
Vol.32, Part 12,Parishes of County Antrim 1832-3, 1835-40, Ballynure and district
Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland / edited by Angélique Day, Patrick McWill. – Vol.35 : Parishes of County Antrim. Templepatrick and district – Belfast : Queen’s University of Belfast Institute of Irish Studies in Vol.35, Part 13, 1833, 1835, 1838,Parishes of County Antrim Templepatrick and district

Ohlmeyer, Jane H.. – Civil War and restoration in the three Stuart kingdoms :the career of Randal MacDonnell, marquis of Antrim, 1609-1683 Cambridge:Cambridge University Press,1993
O’Laverty, James, Rev. An Historical Account of the Diocese of Down and Connor. Dublin 1878-89
O’Neill, Moira. – Collected poems of Moira O’Neill. – Edinburgh; London : W. Blackwood & sons ltd, 1933.
O’Neill, Moira. – More songs of the glens of Antrim. – Edinburgh; London : William Blackwood and Sons, 1921.
O’Neill, Moira. – Songs of the glens of Antrim. – 8th impression. – Edinburgh; London : William Blackwood andSons, 1902.
O’Connor, Arthur, 1763-1852. – The state of Ireland :to which are added his addresses to the electors of the County of Antrim. – Second edition. – London : Printed and sold by all the booksellers, 1798.
Owen, D.J. History of Belfast. Belfast 1921

Patterson, Edward Mervyn. – The Ballymena lines / by Edward M. Patterson. – Newton Abbot : David & Charles, 1968. – (His A history of the narrow-gauge railways of North East Ireland, pt. 2).

Parishes of County Antrim XIV, 1832, 1839-40 / edited by Angélique Day and P. – Carrickfergus. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies in association with The Royal Irish Academy, 1996
Parishes of County Antrim. – 9 : 1830-2, 1835, 1838-9 / edited by Angélique Day, Patrick McWilliams and N. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies in association with The Royal Irish Acamey, 1
1830-2, 1835, 1838-9:North Antrim coast and Rathlin
9,1830-2, 1835, 1838-9
Parishes of County Antrim. – 8, 1831-5, 1837-8 : Ballymena and west Antrim / edited by Angélique Day, Pat. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies in association with The Royal Irish Aca, 1.1993.
8, 1831-5, 1837-8,Ballymena and west Antrim

Place-names of Northern Ireland. – Vol.7 : County Antrim / general editor: Nollaig Ó Muraíle. – Belfast : Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast, 1997
Place-names of Northern Ireland / edited by Gerard Stockman. – Vol.4 : County Antrim. – Belfast : Queen’s University of Belfast, Institute of Irish Studies, 1995
Prison adverts. and potatoe diggings : materials from the public life of Antrim and Down during the years of Government terror which led to the Rebellion of 1798 / (compiled by) Brendan Clifford. – Belfast : Athol Books, 1992. – (United Irish reprints).

Reeves, William. Ecclesiastical Antiquities of Down, Connor and Dromore. 1847
Rogers, Richard. – The North East : Down, Antrim, Armagh, Derry, Tyrone, Fermanagh. – Dublin : Gill and Macmillan, 1980. – (Irish walk guides ; 4).
Rhyming weavers, and other country poets of Antrim and Down / edited and int. – Belfast : Blackstaff Press, 1974

Stewart, A. T. Q. (Anthony Terence Quincey), 1929-. – The summer soldiers : the 1798 Rebellion in Antrim and Down / A.T.Q. Stewart. – Belfast : The Blackstaff Press, 1995
Sibbett, R. M.. – On the shining Bann : records of an Ulster manor / by R.M. Sibbett. – Ballymena : Braid, 1991. – (Ascona series ; 5).
Smyth, Patrick. -Osier culture and basket-making :a study of the basket-making craft in south west County Antrim / Patrick Smyth Lurgan:P. Smyth,1991

Shanks, Amanda N., 1941-. – Rural aristocracy in Northern Ireland. – Aldershot : Avebury, 1988
Shaw, William. Cullybackey, the Story of an Ulster Village. 1913
Sharkie, Brendan. – Antrim 1971-82 / Brendan Sharkie. – [Belfast : B. Sharkie, 1984.
Shrubsole, Edgar S. – Cushendall, Co. Antrim / by Edgar S. Shrubsole. – London : Walbrook and Co, 190
London:Walbrook and Co,[190-?] Shrubsole’s guides. From the O’Kelley collection
St. John Clarke, H.J. Thirty centuries in south-east Antrim: the Parish of Coole or Carnmoney. Belfast, 1938.

The register of the parish church of St Thomas, Lisnagarvey, Co. Antrim 1637. – Dublin : Representative Church Body Library, 1996.
The story of Antrim :the story of the great and the near great, the wise and otherwise, the rich and the poor of Ulster’s historic county town of Antrim :from the prehistoric past to modern times /by Alastair Smyth Antrim:Antrim Borough Council,1984
The history and antiquities of the county of the town of Carrickfergus, from the earliest records till 1839 : also a statistical survey of said county /by Samuel McSkimin McSkimin,Samuel,1774?-1843
Belfast:Mullan & Son, James Cleeland, Davidson & M’Cormack,1909

Walker, Brian Mercer. – Sentry Hill : an Ulster farm and family / Brian M. Walker. – Reprinted with additional photographs. – Belfast : Friar’s Bush Press, 1991
Wilsdon, Bill. – The sites of the 1798 rising in Antrim and Down / Bill Wilsdon. – Belfast : Blackstaff, 1997. – (Blackstaff guides).
Woodman, P. C., Peter C.. – Excavations at Bay Farm 1, Carnlough, Co. Antrim, and the study of the ‘Larn. – Dublin : Royal Irish Academy, 1996. – (Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy
Walsh, Micheline. – The MacDonnells of Antrim on the Continent : O’Donnell lecture delivered at. – [Dublin] : National University of Ireland, 1960. – (O’Donnell lecture ; 4).

Young, Robert M. Historical Notices of Old Belfast and its Vicinity. 1896
Young, Roert M. The Town Book of the Corporation of Belfast, 1613-1816. (Includes Freemen 1635-1796). 1892

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Ballymena Civil Registration District, Co. Antrim Townlands, 1855

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The townlands listed here belonged to the Civil Registration District of BALLYMENA in 1885, some may have been moved to other districts or the name may have changed since then. Also listed are the Civil Parish, Registrar’s District, Electoral District and Barony that each townland belonged to. While these divisions do cause confusion amongst family history researchers unfamiliar with Irish geography, and while parts of some townlands may belong to more than one of these various divisions, the important thing to remember is that each division under which a townland may be listed can be considered a reference to a genealogical resource and that division or reference is the way or means by which you can find more information on that townland or the people who lived in it. The most important divisions listed on this page are really the townland name, the civil parish and the electoral division.

In relation to civil registration of births marriages and deaths, the event will have been registered with the local office for that townland – here listed as the Registrar’s District. That information will then have been forwarded to the main office for the whole District, recorded and filed accordingly – the information will then have been passed on to the Head Office for the whole of Ireland which was in Dublin. The information for all registered births, marrriages and deaths for these townlands will have been referenced under the name of the Poor Law Union in which they occurred. In this case ‘Ballymena’

While the name of the ‘Registrar’s District’ is listed on this page, it is not of any real use to you the researcher other than to know that all registrations from these districts will be filed under ‘Ballymena’ should you be looking at any annual Master Index to those records for Ireland for any event (births, marriages or deaths). It is only when you see the actual record giving the details of the event that you will see the name of any Registrar’s District. Other than that, on the Master Index, the only name listed is that of the Poor Law Union.

The Electoral Division to which any townland belongs is important in that it is under this heading that townlands will be found listed for the Irish 1901 and 1911 censuses. Should you be searching through the index books (of films) for Antrim county in order to ascertain which film you need to request in order to see the information for either census, then, it is under this name that you will find that reference. The film number will be the number assigned to the district – or so it is in the National Archives in Dublin. On each page with this District name will be listed also those townlands included in that Electoral District. However, this page should be considered as a guide only – districts may have been re-assigned in the intervening years and even between both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The importance of the civil parish lies in searching through the Tithe Applotment books, the Griffiths Valuation and for parish records. The Tithes and Griffiths are indexed by Civil Parish. Church of Ireland parish records generally retain the name of the Civil parish. So, if your ancestors came from a townland with a name listed on these pages, then you know which civil parish they may have come from.

Townland Civil Parish Registrar’s District Electoral District Barony
Aghaboy Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Aghacully Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Aghafatten Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Aghavary Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Aghnadore Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Andraid Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Anticur Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Antynanum Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Appletee Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Ardnaglass Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Artibrannan Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Artnacrea Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Aughnacleagh Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Aughnahoy Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Aughterclooney Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Ballee Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Ballsallagh Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Ballybeg Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Ballybogy Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Ballybollen Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Ballybollen Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Ballycloghan Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Ballyclosh Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Ballyconnelly Craigs Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Ballycowan Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Ballycregagh Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Ballycreggy Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Ballydonnelly Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Ballydunmaul Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Ballygarvey Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Ballygelly Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Ballyhutherland Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Ballykeel Ballyclug Ballymena Ballymena Antrim Lower
Ballykennedy Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Ballylesson Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Ballylig Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Ballyligpatrick Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Ballyloughnan Ahoghill Ballymena Ballymena Toome Lower
Ballylummin Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Ballymacilroy Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Ballymarlagh Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Ballymatoskerty Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Ballymena Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Ballyminstra Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Ballymontenagh Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Ballymuckvea Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Ballynacaird Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Ballynafie Portglenone Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Ballynamaddy Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Ballynulto Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Ballyreagh Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Ballytresna Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Ballywatermoy Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Bellaghy Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Bellee Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Bottom Kirkinriola Ballymena Ballymena Toome Lower
Bracknamuckley Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Brae Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Braetown Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Brecart Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Breckagh Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Brocklamont Ahoghill Ballymena Ballymena Toome Lower
Bronghdone Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Broughshane Lower Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Broughshane Upper Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Buckna Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Cabragh Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Caddy Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Caherty Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Carclunty Rasharkin Portglenone Dunminning Kilconway
Cargan Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Carmacmoin Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Carmagrim Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Carnaghts Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Carn-beg Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Carncoagh Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Carndonaghy Ahoghill Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Carnearney Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Carniny Ahoghill Ballymena Ballymena Toome Lower
Carnkeeran Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Carnlea Kirkinriola Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Carn-more Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Carnstroan Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Carrowcowan Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Casheltown Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Clare Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Clatteryknowes Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Cleggan Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Clinty Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Clogher Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Cloghgaldanagh Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Cloghinarney Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Cloghogue Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Cloghogue Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Clonetrace Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Clonkeen Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Coolsythe Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Corbally Ahoghill Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Correen Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Craigdunloof Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Craigefaddock Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Craigfad Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Craignageeragh Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Craigs Craigs Portglenone Dunminning Kilconway
Craigywarren Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Crankill Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Creagh Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Crebilly Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Creevamoy Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Crevilly-valley Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Cromkill Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Crooknahaya Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Cross Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Crosshill Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Crushybracken Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Cullybackey Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Culnafay Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Deerfin Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Dernaveagh Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Doonbought Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Douglas Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Douglas Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Dowgry Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Downkillybegs Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Dreen Craigs Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Dromore Rasharkin Portglenone Dunminning Kilconway
Drumagrove Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Drumakeely Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Drumanaway Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Drumbare Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Drumderg Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Drumfane Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Drumfin Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Drumleekney Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Drummaul Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Drummuck Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Drumnaglea Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Drumramer Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Drumrankin Craigs Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Drumraw Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Drumraymond Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Dunaird Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Dunclug Kirkinriola Ballymena Ballymena Toome Lower
Dundermot Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Duneany Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Dungall Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Dungonnell Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Dunminning Rasharkin Portglenone Dunminning Kilconway
Dunnygarran Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Dunnyvadden Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Eglish Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Eglish Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Elginny Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Evishacrow Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Evishnablay Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Farranacushog Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Fenagh Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Fenaghy Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Fernisky Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Finkiltagh Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Frosses Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Galgorm Ahoghill Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Galgorm Parks Ahoghill Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Garvaghy Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Gillistown Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Glebe Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Glebe Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Glenbuck Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Glenhead Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Glenhugh Ahoghill Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Glenleslie Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Glenocum Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Gloonan Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Gortaheran Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Gortfad Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Gortgill Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Gortgole Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Gortnageeragh Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Grange Park Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Greenhill Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Groggan Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Ilandstown Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Inshamph Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Irishomerbane Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Islandnabracky Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Jockeysquarter Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Kells Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Kernyhill Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Kilcurry Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Kildowney Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Kildrum Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Kilknock Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Killane Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Killycarn Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Killycoogan Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Killycowan Rasharkin Portglenone Dunminning Kilconway
Killycreen Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Killydonnelly Rasharkin Clogh Glenbuck Kilconway
Killyfast Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Killyflugh Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Killygarn Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Killygore Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Killylaes Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Killyless Craigs Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Killyree Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
KilnacoIpagh Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Kilvillis Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Kinbally Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Kinflea Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Kinnegalliagh Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Kirkinriola Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Kllgad Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Knockanully Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Knockboy Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Legagrane Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Legnagooly Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Leymore Ahoghill Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Limavallaghan Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Liminary Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Limnaharry Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Lisbreen Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Lisbreen Half Quarter Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Lismacloskey Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Lismurnaghan Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Lisnacrogher Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Lisnagarran Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Lisnahilt Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Lisnahunshin Craigs Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Lisnamanny Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Lisnamurrikin Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Lisnasoo Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Lisnatlllon Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Lisnawhiggel Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Lisrodden Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Loan Craigs Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Longmore Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Loughconnelly Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Loughloughan Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Loughmagarry Craigs Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Magheraboy Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Magheramully Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Martinstown Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Mill Quarter Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Mistyburn Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Moboy Craigs Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Monaghan Kirkinriola Ballymena Kirkinriola Toome Lower
Moneydollog Ahoghill Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Moneyduff Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Moneyglass Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Moyasset Ahoghill Ahoghill Ballyconnelly Toome Lower
Moylarg Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Muckleramer Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Muckrim Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Mullinsallagh Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Outal Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Pollee Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Procklis Drummaul Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Quolie Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Racavan Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Rathkeel Racavan Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Rathkenny Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Rathsherry Skerry Broughshane Glenravel Antrim Lower
Rooghan Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Rosedermot Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Scotchomerbane Newtown Crommelin Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Shillanavogy Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Skerry East Newtown Crommelin Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Skerry West Newtown Crommelin Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Skerrywhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Glenwhirry Antrim Lower
Slaght Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Slane Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Slievenagh Portglenone Portglenone Portglenone Toome Lower
Springmount Grange of Dundermot Clogh Dundermot Kilconway
Straid Ahoghill Ahoghill Cloghog Toome Upper
Tamlaght Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Tamnaghmore Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Tamybuck Racavan Glenwhirry Slemish Antrim Lower
Tannaghmore Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Tawnybrack Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Taylorstown Grange of Ballyscullion Toome Ballyscullion Toome Upper
Teeshan Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Terrygowan Drummaul Toome Drumanaway Toome Upper
Ticloy Skerry Broughshane Longmore Antrim Lower
Toome Duneane Toome Toome Toome Upper
Town Parks Kirkinriola Ballymena Ballymena Toome Lower
Tuftarney Dunaghy Clogh Newtown Crommelin Kilconway
Tullaghbane Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Tullaghgarley Craigs Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
Tullaghgarley Ahoghill Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Tullaghgarley Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Tully Ballyclug Glenwhirry Ballyclug Antrim Lower
Tullygowan Ahoghill Ahoghill Ahoghill Toome Lower
Tullykittagh Lower Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Tullykittagh. Upper Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Tullymore Skerry Broughshane Broughshane Antrim Lower
Tullynahinnion Portglenone Portglenone Lisnagarran Toome Lower
Tullynamnllan Connor Galgorm Kells Antrim Lower
Tullynewy Dunaghy Clogh Clogh Kilconway
Tullyreagh Kirkinriola Galgorm Galgorm Toome Lower
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Ballymoney Civil Registration District, Co. Antrim Townlands, 1855

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The townlands listed here belonged to the Civil Registration District of BALLYMONEY in 1885, some may have been moved to other districts or the name may have changed since then. Also listed are the Civil Parish, Registrar’s District, Electoral District and Barony that each townland belonged to. While these divisions do cause confusion amongst family history researchers unfamiliar with Irish geography, and while parts of some townlands may belong to more than one of these various divisions, the important thing to remember is that each division under which a townland may be listed can be considered a reference to a genealogical resource and that division or reference is the way or means by which you can find more information on that townland or the people who lived in it. The most important divisions listed on this page are really the townland name, the civil parish and the electoral division.

In relation to civil registration of births marriages and deaths, the event will have been registered with the local office for that townland – here listed as the Registrar’s District. That information will then have been forwarded to the main office for the whole District, recorded and filed accordingly – the information will then have been passed on to the Head Office for the whole of Ireland which was in Dublin. The information for all registered births, marrriages and deaths for these townlands will have been referenced under the name of the Poor Law Union in which they occurred. In this case ‘Ballymoney’

While the name of the ‘Registrar’s District’ is listed on this page, it is not of any real use to you the researcher other than to know that all registrations from these districts will be filed under ‘Ballymoney’ should you be looking at any annual Master Index to those records for Ireland for any event (births, marriages or deaths). It is only when you see the actual record giving the details of the event that you will see the name of any Registrar’s District. Other than that, on the Master Index, the only name listed is that of the Poor Law Union.

The Electoral Division to which any townland belongs is important in that it is under this heading that townlands will be found listed for the Irish 1901 and 1911 censuses. Should you be searching through the index books (of films) for Antrim county in order to ascertain which film you need to request in order to see the information for either census, then, it is under this name that you will find that reference. The film number will be the number assigned to the district – or so it is in the National Archives in Dublin. On each page with this District name will be listed also those townlands included in that Electoral District. However, this page should be considered as a guide only – districts may have been re-assigned in the intervening years and even between both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The importance of the civil parish lies in searching through the Tithe Applotment books, the Griffiths Valuation and for parish records. The Tithes and Griffiths are indexed by Civil Parish. Church of Ireland parish records generally retain the name of the Civil parish. So, if your ancestors came from a townland with a name listed on these pages, then you know which civil parish they may have come from.

NOTE: If the word Devock is listed under Registrar’s District, it should read Dervock

Townland Civil Parish Registrar’s District Electoral District Barony
Aghancrossy Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Aldorough Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Altarichard Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Altaveedan North Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Altaveedan South Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Altnahinch Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Artiferrall Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Artiforty or Shanaghy Lower Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Artigoran Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Artiloman Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Artnagross Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Ballaghbeddy Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Ballaghmore Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Ballybogy Dunluce Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Ballyboylands Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Ballyboylands Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Ballybraddin Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Dunluce Upper
Ballybrakes Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Ballybregagh Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Ballybregagh Lower Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Ballybregagh Upper Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Ballycormick Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Ballydivity Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Ballydonnelly Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Ballydullaghan Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Ballygan Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballygan Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballygobbin Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Ballyhibistock Lower Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Ballyhibistock Upper Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Ballyknock Big Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Ballyknock, Little Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Ballylane Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Ballylig Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Ballylough Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Ballymacaldrack Finvoy Dirraw Dunloy Kilconway
Ballymacfin Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Ballymaconnelly Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Ballymenagh Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Ballynacree Beg Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Ballynacree More Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballynacree Skein Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballynafeigh Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Ballynagabog Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Ballynagarvy Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Ballynagashel Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Ballynagor Billy Devock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Ballynaloob Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Dunluce Upper
Ballynamenagh North or Cumingstown Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Ballynamoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Ballynarry Upper Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Ballynian Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea The Grove Loughinsholin
Ballypatrick Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Ballyportery North Loughguile Castlequarter Killagan Dunluce Upper
Ballyportery South Loughguile Castlequarter Killagan Dunluce Upper
Ballyratahan Lower Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Ballyratahan Upper Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Ballyrobin Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Ballytaggart Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Ballytunn Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Ballyveely Lower Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Ballyveely Upper Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Ballywattick Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballywattick Middle Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballywattick Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballyweeny Loughguile Castlequarter Killagan Dunluce Upper
Ballywindelland Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Ballywindelland Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Beerhill Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Bellisle Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Bendooragh Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Benvardin Dunluce Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Bootown Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Bootown Dunluce Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Bovedy Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Bravallen Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Breckagh Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Broughanore Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Burnquarter Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Cabragh Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Caldanagh Finvoy Dirraw Dunloy Kilconway
Calheme Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Carbalintober Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Carnaff Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Carnagall Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Carnageeragh Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Carnamenagh Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Carnany Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Carnany Upper. Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Carnbeg Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Carnbore Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Carnbuck Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Carncoggy Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Carncullagh Lower Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Carncullagh Middle Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Carncullagh Upper Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Carneatly Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Carney Hill Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Carnfeogue Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Carnfinton Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Carnmoon Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Carracloghy Derrykeighan Devock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Carranroe Aghadowey Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Carrivcashel Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Carrowcrin Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Carrowreagh Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Castlequarter Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Chathamhall Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Church Tamlaght Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Claragh Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Claughey Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Clogh Mills Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Clontyfinnan East Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Clontyfinnan West Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Cloonty Billy Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Coldagh Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Colebreene Lower was Culbrim L. Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Colebreene Upper was Culbrim U. Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Conogher Ballymoney Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Upper
Coole Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Coolhill Aghadowey Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Coolkeeran Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Corkey Middle Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Dunluce Upper
Corkey North Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Dunluce Upper
Corkey South, or Little Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Dunluce Upper
Craigavole Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Craigs Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Crigatempin Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Cross Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Crossland Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Crosstagherty Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Cubbindall Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Culbane Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Culcrum Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Culdoo Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Culdoo Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Culmore Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Culramoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Currysheskin Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Deepstown Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Deffrick Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Derrykeighan Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Dervock Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Desertderrin Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Dirraw Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Dreen Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Drumack Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Drumadarragh Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Dunluce Upper
Drumadoon Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Drumaduan Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Drumagarner Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Drumaheglis Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Drumahiskey Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Drumane Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Drumaqueran Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Drumard Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Drumard Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Drumavaddy Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Drumbest Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Drumcon Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Drumcrottagh Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Drumdallagh Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Drumlane Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Drumlee Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Drumnacanon Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Drumnadvey Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Drumnamallght Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Drumoolish Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Drumrankin Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Drumreagh Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Drumsaragh Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Drumskea Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Drunkendult East Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Drunkendult West Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Dullaghy Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Dunaghy Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Dunaverney Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Dungorbery Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Dunloy Finvoy Dirraw Dunloy Kilconway
Eden Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Enagh Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Enagh Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Erganagh Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Fallahogy Kilrea Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Farranalessary Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Fernagh Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Five Acres Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Fort Town Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Friary Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Ganaby Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Garry Lower. Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Garry Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Garryduff Ballymoney Dirraw Dunloy Kilconway
Glasaaneeran Lower Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Glasaaneeran Upper Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Glebe Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Glebe Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Glebe Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Glebe Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Glengad Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Glenlough Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Glenstall Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Gortahar Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Gortereghy Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Gortin Coolhill Aghadowey Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Gortmacrane Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Gracehlll Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Granagh Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Greenshields Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Greenshields Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Greenville Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Gruig Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Heagles Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Inshinagh Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Islandahoe Derrykeighan Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Islandmore Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Islandrose Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Islands of Carnmoon Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Killins North Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Killins South Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Killygullib Glebe Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Killymaddy Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Killymuck Glebe Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Killyramer Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Kilmandil Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Kilmoyangey Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Kilmoyle Dunluce Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Kilmoyle Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Kilmoyle Upper or Kirkmoyle Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Kilraghts Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Kilrea Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Kingarriff Loughguile Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Kirkhill Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Knockaholet Loughguile Castlequarter Killagan Dunluce Upper
Knockanavery Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Knockanboy Derrykeighan Devock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Knockans Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Knockavallan Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Knockavrinnan Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Knocknahinch Armoy Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Landhead Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Laragh Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Lavin Lower Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Lavin Upper Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Leck Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Legacurry Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Leitrim Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Lisachrin Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Lisboy Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Liscolman Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Lisconnan Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Lisgorgan Glebe Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Lisheegan Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Lislaban Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Lislagan Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Lislagan Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Lislea Kilrea Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Lismoyle Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea The Grove Loughinsholin
Lisnabraugh Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Lisnagavar Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Lisnagroat Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Lisnisk Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Lisnisk Ballyrashane Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Livery Lower Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Livery Upper Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Longhlynch Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Lough-hill Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Love’s Corkey Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Dunluce Upper
Macfinn Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Macfinn Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Maddydoo Upper Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Maddykeel Lower Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Maddykeel Upper Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Magheraboy Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Magheraboy Lower Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Magheraboy Upper Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Magherahoney Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Manola Wood Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Millquarter Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Moneycanon Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Moneygobbin Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Moneygran Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Moneyleck Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Lower Kilconway
Moneyneagh Loughguile Castlequarter Corkey Kilconway
Moneysallin Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Moore Lodge Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Mostragee Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Mount Hamilton Killagan Castlequarter Killagan Kilconway
Movanagher Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Moyagoney Kilrea Kilrea Tamlaght Loughinsholin
Moyaver Lower Armoy Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Moyaver Upper Armoy Dervock Ballycreagh Dunluce Upper
Moyeltra Toy Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Moynock Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Loughinsholin
Mullaghduff Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Mullan Kilrea Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Mullans Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
New Buildings North Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
New Buildings or Maddydoo Low. Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
New Buildings, South Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Newhill Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Pharis Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Polintamny Ballymoney Ballymoney Enagh Dunluce Upper
Prospect Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Roseyards Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Rosnashane Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Rushey Hill Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Seacon Beg Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Seacon Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Seacon More Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Semicock Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Shanaghy Upper Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Shanes Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Shellfield Dunluce Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Shelton North Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Shelton South Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Slievenaghy Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Smallquarter Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Straidbilly Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Stranocum Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Stroan Lower Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Stroan Upper Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Taghey Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Tamlaght Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Tamlaght Aghadowey Kilrea Harvey Hill Coleraine
Tamnyrankin Desertoghill Kilrea The Grove Coleraine
Tate’s Fort Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
Tehorny Rasharkin Dirraw Killoquin Upper Kilconway
Timaconway Tamlaght O’Crilly Kilrea The Grove Loughinsholin
Toberbilly Kilraghts Castlequarter Kilraghts Dunluce Upper
Toberdoney Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Tobernagola Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Topp. Lower Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Topp. Upper Ballymoney Ballymoney Stranocum Dunluce Upper
Townparks Ballymoney Ballymoney Ballymoney Dunluce Upper
Tullaghans Finvoy Dirraw Dirraw Kilconway
Tullaghgore Ballymoney Ballymoney Seacon Dunluce Upper
Tully North Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Tully South Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Tullybane Derrykeighan Dervock Dervock Dunluce Lower
Tullycapple Dunluce Dervock Benvardin Dunluce Lower
Turnagrove Loughguile Castlequarter Castlequarter Dunluce Upper
Turnavedog Loughguile Castlequarter Ballyhoe Dunluce Upper
Unshinagh Finvoy Dirraw Dunloy Kilconway
Urbal Billy Dervock Carnmoon Dunluce Lower
Vow Finvoy Dirraw The Vow Kilconway
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Antrim Civil Registration District, Co. Antrim Townlands, 1855

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The townlands listed here belonged to the Civil Registration District of ANTRIM in 1885, some may have been moved to other districts or the name may have changed since then. Alos listed are the Civil Parish, Registrar’s District, Electoral District and Barony that each townland belonged to. While these divisions do cause confusion amongst family history researchers unfamiliar with Irish geography, and while parts of some townlands may belong to more than one of these various divisions, the important thing to remember is that each division under which a townland may be listed can be considered a reference to a genealogical resource and that division or reference is the way or means by which you can find more information on that townland or the people who lived in it. The most important divisions listed on this page are really the townland name, the civil parish and the electoral division.

In relation to civil registration of births marriages and deaths, the event will have been registered with the local office for that townland – here listed as the Registrar’s District. That information will then have been forwarded to the main office for the whole District, recorded and filed accordingly – the information will then have been passed on to the Head Office for the whole of Ireland which was in Dublin. The information for all registered births, marrriages and deaths for these townlands will have been referenced under the name of the Poor Law Union in which they occurred. In this case ‘Antrim’

While the name of the ‘Registrar’s District’ is listed on this page, it is not of any real use to you the researcher other than to know that all registrations from these districts will be filed under ‘Antrim’ should you be looking at any annual Master Index to those records for Ireland for any event (births, marriages or deaths). It is only when you see the actual record giving the details of the event that you will see the name of any Registrar’s District. Other than that, on the Master Index, the only name listed is that of the Poor Law Union.

The Electoral Division to which any townland belongs is important in that it is under this heading that townlands will be found listed for the Irish 1901 and 1911 censuses. Should you be searching through the index books (of films) for Antrim county in order to ascertain which film you need to request in order to see the information for either census, then, it is under this name that you will find that reference. The film number will be the number assigned to the district – or so it is in the National Archives in Dublin. On each page with this District name will be listed also those townlands included in that Electoral District. However, this page should be considered as a guide only – districts may have been re-assigned in the intervening years and even between both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The importance of the civil parish lies in searching through the Tithe Applotment books, the Griffiths Valuation and for parish records. The Tithes and Griffiths are indexed by Civil Parish. Church of Ireland parish records generally retain the name of the Civil parish. So, if your ancestors came from a townland with a name listed on these pages, then you know which civil parish they may have come from.

Townland Civil Parish Registrar’s District Electoral District Barony
Aghacarnaghan Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Aghacarnaghan (part of) Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Aghaloughan Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Aghnadarragh Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Annaghmore Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ardmore Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Artlone Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Artnagullian Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Artresnahan Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Aughalish Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Aughnamullan Killead Crumlin Dundesert Massereene Lower
Balloo Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Ballyarnot Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Ballybentragh Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Ballybracken Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Ballycalket Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Ballyclan Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Ballyclare Grange of Doagh Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Ballyclare Ballynure Doagh Ballyclare Belfast Lower
Ballyclaverty Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Ballycloghan Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Ballycor Ballycor Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Ballycraigy Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Ballycushan Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Ballydonaghy Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballydugennan Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballyealy North Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Ballyealy South Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Ballyearl Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Ballyeaston Ballycor Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Ballygallagh Ballylinny Doagh Ballyclare Belfast Lower
Ballyginniff Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Ballygortgarve Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballygowan Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Ballygrooby Drummaul Randalstown Randalstown Toome Upper
Ballyhamage Kilbride Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Ballyhartfield Ballymartin Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Upper
Ballyharvey Lower Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Ballyharvey Upper Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Ballyhill Lower Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Ballyhill Upper Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Ballyhowne Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Ballykennedy Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Ballylenully Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Ballylinny Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Ballylurgan Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballylurgan Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Ballymacilhoyle Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Ballymacmary Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Ballymacrevan Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballymartin Ballymartin Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Ballymather Upper Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Ballynabarnish Templepatrick Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Lower
Ballynacooley Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballynacraigy Drummaul Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballynadrentagh Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Ballynafey Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Ballynageeragh Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Ballynaleney (part of) Drummaul Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballynalough Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Ballynamullan Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballynamullan (part of) Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Ballynashee Rashee Connor Rashee Antrim Upper
Ballynoe Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Ballypalady Ballymartin Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Upper
Ballyquillin Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Ballyrobin Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Ballysavage Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Ballysculty Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Ballyseasy Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballyshanaghill Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballytromery Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballytweedy Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Ballyvollen Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Ballywee Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Ballywee Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Ballywoodock Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Barnish Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Barnish Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Birch Hill Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Balllymather Lower Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Bleerick Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Boltnaconnell Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Brettens Wall Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
British Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Brockish, part of Cargin Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Browndod Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Bruslee Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Burnside Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Cargin Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Carlane Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Carmorn Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Carnaghliss Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Carnanee Ballymartin Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Lower
Carncome Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Carnearny Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Carngranny Antrim Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Carnlea Rashee Connor Rashee Antrim Upper
Carntall Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Castlegore Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Caulside Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Cloghanduff Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Clonboy Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Coggrey Grange of Doagh Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Connor Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Corbally Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Craigarogan Templepatrick Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Lower
Craigmore Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Craigy Hill Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Cranfield Cranfield Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Crawfordsland Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Creeve Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Creevery Antrim Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Creggan Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Cromy & Taggartsland Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Crookedstone Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Crosshill Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Crosskennan Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Deerpark Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Derrygowan Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Derryhollagh Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Doagh Grange of Doagh Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Donegore Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Donegore Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Douglasland Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Drumadarragh Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Drumagorgan Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Drumboe Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Drumcullen Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Drumkeeran Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Drumsough Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Dunadry Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Dunamoy Rashee Connor Rashee Antrim Upper
Dunamuggy Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Duncansland Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Dundesert Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Dungonnell Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Dunsilly Antrim Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Durham’s Land Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Edenvale Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Eskylane Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Farlough Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Farranshane Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Feehogue Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Ferguson’s Land Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Fiftyacres Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Forthill Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Freemanstown Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Gallagh Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Gallanagh Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Gallyhill Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Garriffgeery Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Gartree Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Glenmullion Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Gobrana Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Gortagharn Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Gortgarn Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Gortnagallon Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Grange of Ballyrobert Templepatrick Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Lower
Grange of Ballywalter Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Grange of Carmavy Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Grange of Umgall Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Greenan Duneane Randalstown Cranfield Toome Upper
Half Umry Antrim Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Halftown Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Holestone Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Holy Well Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Hungry Hill Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Hurtletoot Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Irishtown Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Islandbane Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Islandreagh Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Kilbegs Antrim Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Kilbride Grange of Doagh Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Kilbride Kilbride Doagh Ballyclare Antrim Upper
Kilcross Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Kilgavanagh Antrim Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Kilgreel Templepatrick Templepatrick Craigarogan Belfast Lower
Killealy Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Killyfad Drummaul Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Kilmakee Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Kingsbog Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Ladyhill Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Langarve Camlin  Crumlin Crumlin Massereene Upper
Largy Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Leitrim Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Lenagh Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Lisiunnan Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Lisnagreggan Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Lisnalinchy Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Lisnataylor Killead  Antrim Ballyrobin Massereene Lower
Lisnevanagh Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Loonburn Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Loughermore Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Lurgan West Drummaul Randalstown Randalstown Toome Upper
Magherabeg Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Magheralane Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Maghereagh Antrim Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Maghereagh Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Maxwellswalls Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Moneynick Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Moneyrod Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Moss-side Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Mount Shalgus Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Moyadam Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Moylinny Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Muckamore Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Mullaghgaun Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
M’Vickersland Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
New Park Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Niblock Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Oldstone Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Owensland Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Park Hall Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Portlee Drummaul Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Portlee (part of) Drummaul Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Potters Walls Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Quarter Lenagh Antrim Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Rams Island – L. Neagh Camlin  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Upper
Ranaghan Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Randalstown Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Randox Killead  Crumlin Ballynadrentagh Massereene Lower
Rashee Rashee Connor Rashee Antrim Upper
Rathbeg Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Rathbeg Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Rathenraw Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Rathmore Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Rathmore Grange of Nilteen Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Rickamore Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Ross Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Scolboa Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Seacash Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Shaneoguestown Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Shanes Castle Antrim Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Shane’s Castle Park Drummaul  Randalstown  Randalstown Toome Upper
Sharvogues Drummaul Randalstown  Sharvogues Toome Upper
Spring Farm Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Staffordstown Duneane Randalstown  Cranfield Toome Upper
Steeple Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Stiles Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Straidballymorris Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Straidhavern Killead  Crumlin Dundesert  Massereene Lower
Straidnahanna Ballylinny Doagh Ballylinny Belfast Lower
Strawpark Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Tamnaderry Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Tardree Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Tavnaghmore Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Tildarg Rashee Connor Rashee Antrim Upper
Tirgracey Grange of Muckamore Antrim Antrim Massereene Lower
Toberagnee Ballymartin Templepatrick Templepatrick Belfast Upper
Tobergill Donegore Templepatrick Donegore Antrim Upper
Tobernaveen Grange of Shildovan Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Town Parks Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
Tullaghbeg Duneane Randalstown  Cargin Toome Upper
Tully Killead  Crumlin Seacash Massereene Lower
Tullycrenaght Antrim Connor Shilvodan Toome Upper
Walkmill Kilbride Doagh Kilbride Antrim Upper
Whappstown Connor Connor Connor Antrim Lower
Whin Park Antrim Antrim Antrim Antrim Upper
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Ballycastle Civil Registration District, Co. Antrim Townlands, 1855

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The townlands listed here belonged to the Civil Registration District of BALLYCASTLE in 1885, some may have been moved to other districts or the name may have changed since then. Also listed are the Civil Parish, Registrar’s District, Electoral District and Barony that each townland belonged to. While these divisions do cause confusion amongst family history researchers unfamiliar with Irish geography, and while parts of some townlands may belong to more than one of these various divisions, the important thing to remember is that each division under which a townland may be listed can be considered a reference to a genealogical resource and that division or reference is the way or means by which you can find more information on that townland or the people who lived in it. The most important divisions listed on this page are really the townland name, the civil parish and the electoral division.

In relation to civil registration of births marriages and deaths, the event will have been registered with the local office for that townland – here listed as the Registrar’s District. That information will then have been forwarded to the main office for the whole District, recorded and filed accordingly – the information will then have been passed on to the Head Office for the whole of Ireland which was in Dublin. The information for all registered births, marrriages and deaths for these townlands will have been referenced under the name of the Poor Law Union in which they occurred. In this case ‘Ballycastle’

While the name of the ‘Registrar’s District’ is listed on this page, it is not of any real use to you the researcher other than to know that all registrations from these districts will be filed under ‘Ballycastle’ should you be looking at any annual Master Index to those records for Ireland for any event (births, marriages or deaths). It is only when you see the actual record giving the details of the event that you will see the name of any Registrar’s District. Other than that, on the Master Index, the only name listed is that of the Poor Law Union.

The Electoral Division to which any townland belongs is important in that it is under this heading that townlands will be found listed for the Irish 1901 and 1911 censuses. Should you be searching through the index books (of films) for Antrim county in order to ascertain which film you need to request in order to see the information for either census, then, it is under this name that you will find that reference. The film number will be the number assigned to the district – or so it is in the National Archives in Dublin. On each page with this District name will be listed also those townlands included in that Electoral District. However, this page should be considered as a guide only – districts may have been re-assigned in the intervening years and even between both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The importance of the civil parish lies in searching through the Tithe Applotment books, the Griffiths Valuation and for parish records. The Tithes and Griffiths are indexed by Civil Parish. Church of Ireland parish records generally retain the name of the Civil parish. So, if your ancestors came from a townland with a name listed on these pages, then you know which civil parish they may have come from.

Townland Civil Parish Registrar’s District Electoral District Barony
Acravally Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Aghaheigh Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Aghaleck Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Aghrunniaght Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Agolagh Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Aird Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Alcrossagh Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Altagore Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Altmore Lower Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Altmore Upper Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Araboy Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Ardagh Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Ardaghmore or Glentop Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Ardicoan Grange of Inispollan Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Artimacormick Ballintoy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Aughnaholle Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Aughnasillagh Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Balleny Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Ballindam Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Ballinlea Lower Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Ballinlea Upper Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Ballinloughan Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Ballintoy Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Ballintoy Demesne Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Ballure Grange of Inispollan Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Ballyagan Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Ballyallaght Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Ballyberidagh North Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Ballyberidagh South Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Ballybrack Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Ballycarry Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballycleagh Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Ballyconagan Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballydurnian Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Ballyfad Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Ballygil North Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballygill Middle Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballygill South Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballykenver Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Ballylig Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Ballymacdoe Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Ballymoy Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Ballynagard Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Ballynagard Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballynaglogh Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Ballynahaville Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Ballynalougher Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Ballynastraid Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Ballynoe Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Ballyoglagh Billy Croagh Croagh Cary
Ballypatrick Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Ballyreagh Upper Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Ballyreagh Lower Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Ballyteerim Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Ballyveely Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Ballyvennaght Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Ballyvooly Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Ballyvoy Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Baraghilly Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Barard Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Barmeen Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Barnish Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Beaghs Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Bellisk, or Waterford Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Bighouse Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Bonamargy Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Brackney Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Breen Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Brockaghs Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Broom-beg Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Broom-more Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Broughanlea Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Broughgammon Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Broughmore Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Bunshanacloney Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Callisnagh Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Cape Castle Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Carey Mill Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Carnahagh Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Carnamaddy Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Carnanee Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Carnasheeran Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Carncolp Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Carnduff Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Carneatly Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Carnkirk Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Carnkirn Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Carnlelis Ballintoy Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Carnmoon Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Carnsampson Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Carnside Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Carravinally Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Carravindoon Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Carrowcloghan Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Carroweroey Ballintoy Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Carrowlaverty Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Carrowreagh Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Carrowreagh Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Carrowreagh Mountain Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Cashlan Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Castlenagree Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Castlepark Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Church Quarter Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Churchfield Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Clady Grange of Inispollan Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Clare Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Clare Mountain Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Cleggan Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Cleggan Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Clegnagh Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Clegnagh Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Clegnagh Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Cloghanmurry Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Cloghcorr Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Cloghglass Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Cloghs Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Cloghy East Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Cloghy West Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Cloney Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Clyttaghan Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Coolaveely Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Coolkenny Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Coolmaghra Ballintoy Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Coolnagoppoge Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Coolranny Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Corlane Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Corrymellagh Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Corvally Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Coshkib Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Craig Ballintoy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Craigalappan Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Craiganee Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Craigfad Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Craighban Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Craigmacagan Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Craignamaddy Billy Croagh Croagh Cary
Cregganboy Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Croaghbeg Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Croaghmore Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Cromaghs Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Cross Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Culbidag Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Curragh Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Curramoney Ballintoy Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Currysheskin Ballintoy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Cushendall Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Cushendun Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Cushleake Mountain, middle Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Cushleake Mountain, north Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Cushleake Mountain, south Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Demesne Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Dira, or Up. Broghindrummin Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Doonans Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Doonfin Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Doory Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Dromore Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Drumacullin Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Drumadoon Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Drumahaman Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Drumahitt Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Drumaridly Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Drumaroan Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Drumavoley Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Drumawillin Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Drumcudree Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Drumeeny Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Drumfresky Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Drummans Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Drumnacur Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Drumnagee Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Drumnagessan Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Drumnaheigh Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Drumnakceel Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Drumnasmear Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Drumronn Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Duncarbit Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Dunmakelter Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Dunouragan Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
East Torr Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Eglish Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Ellanabongh Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Eshery Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Essan Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Fallinerlea Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Falmacrilly Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Falnaglass Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Farranmacallan Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Farranmacarter Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Faughil Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Feigh alias Dunseveriek Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Feigh Mountain Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Foriff Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Glasmullen Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Glebe Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Glebe Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Glebe Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Glebe Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Glenaan Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Glenmakeeran Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
Glenstaghey Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Glenville or Leamore Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Goodland Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Gortaclee Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Gortaghragan Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Gortamaddy or White Hall Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Gortateean Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Gortconny Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Gortlane Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Gortmillish Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Gortnagross Lower, or Murroo Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Grange of Inispollan Mountain Grange of Inispollan Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Greenan Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Gruig Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Iderown Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Inispollan Grange of Inispollan Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Irragh Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Island Macallan Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Islandboy Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Issbawn, or Up. Gortnagross Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Kebble Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Kilcreg Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Kilcroagh Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Killoughag Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Kilmahamogue Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Kilmore Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Kilmoyle Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Kilndore Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Kilpatrick Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Kilrobert Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Kinkeel Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Kinramer North Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Kinramer South Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Kinune Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Knockacully Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Knockans Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Knockans Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Knockans South Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Knockans North Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Knockbrack Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Knockeny Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Knockmacolusky Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Knocknacarry Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Knocknacrow Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Knocknagarvan Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Knocksoghey Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Lagavara Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Lagflugh Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Laney Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Layd Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Legg Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Lemnagh Beg Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Lemnagh More Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Ligadaughtan Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Lisbellanagroagh Beg Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Lisbellanagroagh More Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Lismorrity Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Lisnaght Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Lisnagunogue Lower Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Lisnagunogue Upper Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Lisserluss Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Lossett Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Loughan Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Lubitavish Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Magheraboy Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Magheracashel Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Magheramore Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Maghereeroy Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Magherindonnell Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Maghernahar Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Manister Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Mazes Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Middle Gortnagross Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Middle Park Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
MiIl Five Acres Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Monanclogh Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Moneyvart Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Moss-side Grange of Drumtullagh Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Mount Edwards Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Moyargret Lower Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Moyargret Upper Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Moycraig Hamilton Lilly Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Moycraig Lower Lilly Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Moycraig Macallister Lilly Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Moycraig Upper Lilly Croagh Drumtullagh Cary
Mullaghduff, Big Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Mullaghduff, Little Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Mullarts Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Mullarts Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Mullinaskeagh Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Mullindress Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Novally Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Ouna or Eagle Hill Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Park Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Parkmore or Aganlane Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Prolusk Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Rananagh Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Red Bay Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Retreat or Cloghglass Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Roonivoolin Rathlin Island Ballycastle Rathlin Cary
Savagh Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Shaninish Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Sleans Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Straid Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Stroan Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Tavnaghan Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Tavnagharry Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Tavnaghboy Ramoan Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Tavnaghdrissagh Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Tavnaghoney Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Tavnaghowen Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Tavnaghranny or Low Broghindrummin Grange of Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Templastragh Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Tenaghs Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenshesk Cary
Tervillin Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Timpan Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
Tirkilly Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Toberbilly Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Toberkeagh Ballintoy Croagh Croagh Cary
Toberwine Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Tonduff Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Tonduff Mountain Billy Croagh Dunseverick Cary
Torcorr Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Torglass Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Tornabodagh Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Tornamoney Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
Tornaroan Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Townparks Ramoan Ballycastle Ballycastle Cary
Tromra Layd Cushendall Cushendall Glenarm Lower
Tullaghore Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Tully Layd Cushendall Red Bay Glenarm Lower
Tureagh Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Turnarobert Armoy Ballycastle Armoy Cary
Turraloskin Ramoan Ballycastle Ramoan Cary
Twenty Acres Culfeightrin Ballycastle The Fair Head Cary
Unshanagh Layd Cushendall Glendun Glenarm Lower
West Torr Culfeightrim Ballycastle Glenmakeeran Cary
White Park Ballintoy Croagh Ballintoy Cary
Whitehouse Culfeightrin Cushendall Clashleake Cary
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Armagh Muster Rolls, 1630

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This index has been created from an article published in Seanchas Ardmhaca in 1970. Vol. 5, No. 2: Author: T.G.F. Paterson. You are advised to read through any grouping for the letter beginning with any surname you are interested in (at least) as there are phonetic variations on surnames in these tables.

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A Frenchman’s Walk Through Ireland, 1796-97

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Translated from the French of De Latocnaye by John Stevenson. Publisher: Dublin ; Belfast : Hodges, Figgis : McCaw, Stevenson & Orr, [1918].

Londonderry

The approaches to Londonderry are charming, and indicate the wealth of a great city. The borders of the pretty river Derg are cultivated and cared for like a garden, and dotted with country houses. The city itself, situated on an eminence, is seen from afar, and has a fine appearance, which is increased by the tall spire which Lord Bristol (Bishop of Derry) has had built by subscription.

The city enclosure, proper, is not very much, but the suburbs are very fine. The old walls exist and are used as an agreeable promenade, disfigured very little by an ‘arc de triomphe’ which has only the look of a large door or gate ; on the keystone is cut the date, 1689, in large figures, being the year in which this city was besieged by King James. There should, at least, be a stairway made to allow of communication between the two ends of the promenade. As these ramparts are of no present utility, it seems to me that if they were put out of existence and used as material to extend the hill platform on which the city is situated, it would be infinitely better for the place, and would allow the air to circulate in the streets. However, the inhabitants are jealous of attempts on their walls, and still recall the memorable siege the city sustained against King James. Certainly the walls would be of no use now in resisting an attack.

I went to visit the place of James’ camp, as well as the different French posts. These latter seem to me to be cleverly chosen, but what astonished me was, how it was possible for the English frigate to force a passage in spite of the chain which barred the river, and the batteries which were on the banks. It was known that the city was almost on the point of surrendering, and that the English fleet had been obliged to retire to Lough Swilly, where it had waited nearly six weeks, without finding means of conveying succour to the besieged. Knowing, however, the extremity to which the inhabitants of the city were reduced, it was resolved to take the risk of forcing the passage by a frigate, accompanied by two or three transport vessels.

As the surrender of the place depended on the success or non-success of the enterprise, it can be imagined what interest this excited for both parties. The frigate, carried by a good breeze and by the tide current, struck the boom with violence, and by the rebound was thrown so far out of the channel as to be stranded ; but, happily, the captain, profiting by the rising tide, freed his ship by the expedient of firing the whole of the cannons on the side on which the vessel had touched ground, and the tide carried the ship through the boom, which had been broken by the first shock. When the frigate had passed through, the captain and crew cried ‘ Huzza, huzza! ‘ (called here ‘ three cheers ‘), and had the misfortune in commencing the third ‘ huzza ‘ to have his head carried off by a cannon ball.

Londonderry has not the air of an Irish town. There is there an activity and an industry which are not generally to be found in other parts of the country. The principal trade consists in linens, of which there is a market once or twice a week. It is surprising to note the speed with which the linen merchants examine the cloth. They stand on a sort of platform with a little desk before them, while the peasants carry their webs past and stop for just a moment. The merchant looks, and immediately mentions a price ; if it is accepted, he marks it on the cloth, and the peasant goes to the office for payment. There is one merchant who on every market day, buys in a single hour cloth to the value of three or four hundred pounds sterling.

It is very strange that, although the flax from which this linen is made grows in the country; they have never been able to save seed, and are obliged to bring it from America. The first manufactures of linen were established in Ireland by the Protestants who quitted France under the reign of Louis XIV, and carried their industry to another country. The exportation of this linen is a source of immense profit to Ireland. According to the researches I have been able to make into the subject of the exportation of linen, salted beef, and grain, it would appear that in the last ten years (in spite of the great number of absentee rich who draw away enormous sums) Ireland has received annually about two hundred thousand pounds sterling more than she has paid out of the country. If such a state of affairs can be continued for some time, this country will soon reach a pitch of prosperity which few nations can hope to equal.(see note 1 at end of page)

When I was at Londonderry there was there, exhibiting himself, a Polish dwarf who called himself Count Boralosky. He may have been two and a half feet high. This is a most extraordinary little being. He speaks four or five languages, and has been very well brought up. His age is put down as between fifty and sixty years, and he has travelled much in Great Britain, where there are few towns which have not made his acquaintance. It is said that his wife, who , is of ordinary stature, in a matrimonial quarrel, one day lifted him and set him on the mantelpiece. There was also in the same town a certain learned man, whose opposition to femininity was such that I have seen him throw his glass into the fire because, without his knowledge, it had been filled in order that he might drink to the health of the ladies.

The bishopric of Derry is one of the best of Ireland. They say it is worth £12,000 per annum. Oh, what a lovely thing it is to be an Anglican bishop or minister! These are the spoiled children of fortune, rich as bankers, enjoying good wine, good cheer, and pretty women, and all that for their benediction. God bless them! Oh, if I could one day wear the ‘philibeg’ (see note 2 at end of page) of black satin how much better than being exiled that would be! Lord Bristol, besides his bishopric, has a fortune of fifteen to twenty thousand pounds sterling per annum. He is a man of talent, a learned man, but of singular habits. He travels nearly all the time in foreign countries, and spends nearly his whole income in superb houses, which are of use to the country through the money they cost.

It is rather singular to remark how in Ireland there is so little ceremonious politeness in public, while there is a great deal of it in private houses. In the inn at which I stopped there was given a grand ball. When the supper was announced, it was not without interest for are to observe how the whole company ran to table, everybody hurrying for a place without regard to others. It happened one day that Lady xxxxxx, who was queen of the ball, by not hurrying enough, was left without a seat. The same thing happened to me on this occasion, for, while I was philosophically regarding the spectacle, all the places were filled, and it was only with some trouble that I found a seat at the end of a form. I do not cite this as peculiar to Londonderry, it is an amusing moment at the public balls in Ireland when supper is announced.

It was only at Londonderry that I began to observe the spirit of contention then reigning in this northern province. Leaving this pleasant town, and passing through Newton Limavady, I came to the house of Mr. McCausland at Fruithill, and after a sojourn of a day or two there, he conducted me to the house of the Rev. Mr. Sampson, for whom I had a letter. This reverend gentleman is reputed to be a violent anti-ministerialist. Nevertheless, he is still esteemed by many who have political opinions differing from his. I found him a most agreeable and well-educated man. It is strange how I find it so easy to accommodate myself to persons whose opinions are totally different from mine, while it has often happened to me that I have had quarrels with people who were very much of my own way of thinking.

The shore began already to take on some of the character of the famous Giant’s Causeway. The perpendicular rocks under which I passed are basaltic, and cover a stratum of limestone of singular whiteness.

The Bishop of Derry has built a superb palace in an unfrequented spot, or rather a place that was entirely desert before the erection of the building. It is with pleasure that one notices here a large number of houses for the peasants, built by the bishop at his own charges. They seem very fit and comfortable, and the peasants themselves, the tenants, seem to be greatly attached to their bishop, although they have never seen him. The house of Downhill is full of beautiful paintings, which Lord Bristol has brought with him from Italy. He has built a temple of fine architecture on the edge of a precipice, as if to brave the waves and winds. The sea furiously beats against the perpendicular rocks at its base, and rises at times to a height of 150 feet. The temple is, not without reason, dedicated to Eolus.

From here one can distinguish perfectly the coast of Scotland, and I looked at it, not without pleasure, having the intention to pass the winter in that country. Although my travels here, on the whole, have been agreeable, one tires towards the end, and I was now in my sixth month of a rather uncommon pilgrimage.

I was received here by the Rev. Mr. Burrowes, who is Archdeacon of the diocese, and it was just at this point that the public excitement showed itself most particularly. One of the domestics of the house, returning from Coleraine, reported that the house of one Captain O’Hara had been burned, and his family murdered. I thought at the time that it was an imposture of the lackey, in order to see what effect the news would produce on his master. The next day I went to Coleraine and found that nothing of the kind had happened. There had been a fight in the fair, in which blows of sticks had been received and given, but that was all.

I was received with much kindness in this town by Mr. Richardson; with whom I passed three or four days. The country women-folk at Coleraine are, on Sundays, very like the Scotch peasant women in the neighbourhood of Montrose. They are extremely well dressed, their shoulders usually covered by a red mantle. One can hardly believe that this is Ireland.

I walked one day along the river Bann, which flows out of Lough Neagh, a lake of which I shall speak later. Wishing to inform myself of the state of the country, I stopped Mr. Richardson’s servant with the horse, and risked going into a cabin and talking with the family, as I was accustomed to do when moving on foot. I praised the country, and said that it was a cruel thing that any should say that the country people were not ready to defend the Constitution, &c., &c. The good folk were very reserved as long as I remained in the cabin, but as soon as I left, I was followed by a young man who had more confidence in me, and who commenced to retail to me the kind of trifling nonsense on which the people of France fed themselves before the Revolution. I was really surprised to hear all this talk about equality, fraternity, and oppression. After a little I asked him What was the oppression of which he complained. He named taxes on wine and beer, and when I asked him if he ever drank the one or the other, he said it was all the same ; it was very hard on o those who had to pay, with more nonsense of this kind. He spoke also about the reform of Parliament, and complained much of abuses in elections, preached of tolerance, and indulged in philosophical discourse, such as was heard from our foppish talkers before the Revolution. To tell the truth, I returned from my excursion with a poor opinion of the United Irishman.

It is possible that there may be really some cause for complaint, for where is the country which has a government free from abuses? But it is evident here that the murmurings of the peasants have been put into their heads by people of another feather. What difference to the peasants do plurality of votes, parliamentary elections, impediments of commerce, taxes on wine, and other goods, make? He need not trouble himself about any of these things, provided he is allowed peaceably to enjoy the fruit of his labour, and that he is assured of personal liberty. Save in these matters ; what need he care whether it is Peter or James who occupies such and such a place, whether the Government under which he lives is republican or monarchical ; he need think of none of these things. To make him believe that he has cause for complaint, he must be led to believe that his ills come from things which have not the smallest relation to them. Thus it has always been in France, thus it will be always.

The evening before my departure, Mr. Richardson asked me how I liked the horse which he had lent me for riding about the country, and on receiving my answer he said, “The season is far advanced, the weather is bad, he will be a good travelling companion for you.” I refused the gift, but in the end he gave orders to a servant to take the horse to a house which I was going to. It is often agreeable to have a ‘Rosinante’ with whom to speak when travelling a bad road. This is the second time that I had experienced such an act of goodness in my travels, the first offer was made to me by Mr. Peter Latouche. Then it was in the middle of the summer, and the dread of being indiscreet joined to the fear that I should not know what to do with the poor horse made me, at that time, absolutely refuse. Here the circumstances were quite different.

The Giant’s Causeway

I paid my respects to the famous work of the Giants, and stopped for a moment to see an old castle belonging to the Marchioness of Antrim, to which alone the goats have access. The only passage for man is an arch one foot wide, without protection and over a deep precipice. I observed, along the way, several quarries in which the basalt is arranged in pillars of five or six sides like those of the Causeway. The coasts all along here are very high, and everywhere below the basalt there is a thick stratum of limestone, white as snow, and studded with flints. After a long circuit, I arrived at last at the famous Giant’s Causeway. Persons who come here in the hope of seeing something unnatural and extraordinary are commonly disappointed, and find it unlike the idea they had formed of the place from description, The Causeway is not any more astonishing than the quarries through the country, where the basalt is found disposed in the same manner, What is most striking is the perpendicular rock face, four or five hundred feet high, springing from the bosom of the sea. The different strata of which it is composed are easily distinguished. Sometimes there is a reddish tufa-like layer, at other points it is basalt in a confused contorted state, sometimes ranged in regular columns, and in one place having really some resemblance to the pipes of an organ. The Giant’s Causeway, as they call it, is a part of the same matter detached from the mountain, at low tides one can follow it pretty far. The waves break against it with singular fury. Here it forms a species of pavement about thirty or forty feet wide, the ends of the straight columns forming the pavement. There is no space between them, although their conformation is not very regular ; some have six, some seven, some eight, others only four sides, but the greatest number are pentagonal. The Causeway proceeds about two hundred paces by a gentle slope, finally disappearing under the later. The most remarkable thing about these pillars is that they are not of a single piece but composed of detached stones, always convex at the upper end, and adjusting themselves perfectly to the concavity of the next stone above.

In the same direction, at ten or twelve leagues distance over the sea, on the coast of Scotland, is the island of Staffa, of which I have already made mention in the volume on Great Britain. It is composed of smaller stones and is not less curious.

Many people have examined this formation, and have formulated ingenious theories accounting for its origin. Some pretend that it is the product of a volcano others that the basalt was at first soft, and according as it contained more or less mineral, its columns are store or less perfect.

I have seen, in many other places, stones of the same character. The city of Edinburgh is situated on a rock of like material. Arthur’s Seat, a mountain near Edinburgh, is entirely of this stone ; on the southern side, the basalt is even formed of pillars of five or six faces. Near the city there is exhibited a singular phenomenon : a line of basalt six or seven feet wide, which extends for an immense distance, and of which the end is really not known. It crosses stones of other species and coal, and it has been remarked that the coal which is, found on its two sides has lost nearly all its quality, and resembles burnt coal. This observation has been the cause of many speculations, and of a theory which is perhaps not ill-founded. This assumes that the basalt is the product of remarkable convulsions, in which the earth has opened and vomited the basalt in a state of fusion. The columns which form at such places depend on the quantity of mineral contained in them. Examples are given of extraordinary effusion of basalt in the Isle of Arran at the mouth of the Clyde. There the principal mountain is of granite, and, in the middle, there is observable a line of basalt ten or twelve feet wide, right up to the summit. These theory-makers assert that this basalt in the interior of the rock at Arran and in the long line appearing at Edinburgh will gigantic cracks, the result of some terrible earth convulsion, the basalt in a state of fusion rushing into openings made in the crust of the earth.

On going to the Causeway, to Mr. Moore, I saw a hill and some fields dotted over by a great number of peasants, or people of the small farmer class. I asked how they came to be there and was told that they were occupied in raising the potatoes of a man for whom they had a friendly feeling ; such action, it appears, is not uncommon. It is always somewhat disagreeable to be caught in a crowd, especially if one is a stranger, and I hesitated whether to advance or take another road. In the end, however, reflecting that I had no potatoes to unearth, and the people seeming to work very peaceably, I went on and passed through the crowd, no person taking any notice of me whatever.

I am told that it is an old custom with the peasantry here to assemble at the end of the autumn and to dig up the potatoes of persons for whom they have any sort of affection. What caused some uneasiness to the Government, on this occasion, was the fact that the potatoes which were raised were those of persons who had been arrested for high treason, or of persons who were known to be disaffected, although; to my knowledge, they had shown the same favour to persons who were attached to the Government. Mr. Moore, for example, whose hospitality I enjoyed that day, found that he could not refuse to allow the favour to be bestowed on him without attracting ill-will.

These gatherings are conducted with the greatest order. A man, with nothing special to distinguish him, enacted obedience and directed affairs by signs with the hand or by certain calls. The whole time the work went on men, women, and children sang, accompanied by one or other kind of instrument. No one is allowed at such gatherings to drink any strong liquor, and this certainly requires a great effort in this part of the country. I can say with truth that the regulation is observed roost literally, for I have never seen a single person under the influence of drink near these potato gatherings. I do not say that there were not a few in the neighbouring villages, it would have been a miracle had it been otherwise. For the occasion the peasantry had put on their best clothes ; the air of gaiety and good-humour which showed itself among them would have made any spectator believe that he had arrived on a ‘fête’ day. The road was covered with horses belonging to the farmers who assisted in the gathering. If a similar gathering took place in France, or even in England I very much doubt if matters would proceed so peacefully. I believe that these gatherings, if allowed to continue, might have become dangerous, when the spirit of discontent which reigned at the time in the country is considered. The Government acted wisely in forbidding them some time afterwards, and it is to be reported in favour of the character of the people of this country, that they did not attempt to act against the wish of the authorities.

To me it is very strange to see that these Irish with their mutinous dispositions, submit to rule so readily. I have already said, and I repeat with pleasure that guided by capable men who are actuated by motives of public welfare, there is no people I have known so easily led for good. These frequent seditions prove nothing more than the sensibility of the race, and if the Government would only give up at once and absolutely the attempt to Anglicise the Irish at any cost and would lead them through their prejudices add customs it would be possible to do with them anything that could be wished.

Following the coast along the summit of the hill, which is composed of the same materials as the Causeway my attention was called to the different phenomena of the basalt, the different figures it takes, sometimes in the form of pillar, sometimes in matter confused and without order. The weather was magnificent ; the sea beat again the foot of the rocks four or five hundred feet below ; Scotland and the islands of the west showed on the horizon over a calm, blue sea. Even my horse seemed to joy in the beauty of the scene, approaching to the edge of the precipice and letting his eye range the horizon with a look of admiration. This need not be considered astonishing. Who has not read in travels and romances the affecting declarations of fair more stupid beasts on some scene, sometimes only on the beauty of moonlight? I never come across these beautiful descriptions in books without turning over twenty or thirty pages, so as to come to the dawn if the author spoke of the moon, or to the night if he spoke of the sun.

I stopped at a little village where I saw numbers of people assembled, and I had the pleasure of being present at the baptism of an infant. In the north of Scotland in such cases they make the poor little creature swallow a spoonful of whisky, to keep it from crying ; here, for the same reason, they put a little butter into an eggshell, and mix it with bread and sugar, and the nurse on the end of her linger puts a little of the mixture into the infant’s mouth. I do not know if this is the custom in any other country, but I think the result must be very much as if they should put into the child’s throat a little flax tow with cider mixed through it.

Ballycastle & Fair Head

After a long walk I arrived at Ballycastle, where I was received with much kindness by Mr. Ezekiel Boyd. On the day of my arrival the company in garrison in this little town left, and was replaced by one of a Scotch regiment. These were very well received by the inhabitants, who, during the night, may it please you stole the whole of the ammunition and the half of the arms of the soldiers! Just imagine stealing the arms and ammunition of soldiers. I’d rather that they would steal the shirts and breeches off my soldiers if they would leave them their arms and ammunition. All that was done here was to hale a few people before Mr. Boyd who is a Justice of the Peace. They all swore on the Gospel, one after the other, that they had no knowledge whatever of the powder and guns stolen.

In one of my walks I came to Fair Head, a great cape pointing Scotlandwards and the extreme northerly point of Ireland. The rocks rise gradually from near Ballycastle and the most northern portion is also the most elevated above the sea.

The singular disposition of the various strata in this mountain merits attention, especially at the part where the coal mine is worked, almost on the margin of the sea. I have marked the different layers as they appeared from the sea level, and measuring them, by look of eye only, the order and thickness appeared to be as I have marked down here.

Basalt – 18 feet
Mixed coal. – 3 feet
Tufa, reddish stone – 10 feet
Sulphurous coal – 3 feet
Tufa, grey stone – 10 feet
Mixed coal – 6 feet
Tufa, red – 8 feet
Mixed coal. – 1 foot
Tufa red – 8 feet
Coal, the true vein – 7 feet
Tufa, red stone ……

I had the fancy to enter this coal mine, and I went through it to the very end ; it is a little amusement which, like marriage, one may try once, but I shall not indulge in it again. The mine stretches for about half a mile underground, in a horizontal direction, with sufficient elevation in the line to allow of water flowing away. There is another mine above, and the workers in the two sometimes approach near enough to hear each other working. Possibly the two workings will join soon. The proprietors should consider the question of digging a perpendicular shoot, or well, into the mine, in order to allow the air in it to be renewed, for when the wind is in the west the vapour is carried into the interior, and makes it suffocating. If this shaft were made, there would be a current, and no inconvenience would be felt. The coal which they take from this mine is the best I have seen in Ireland. It is exactly like Scotch coal, but does not burn so quickly, and the mine seems inexhaustible. The Irish Parliament, sensible of the immense advantage which may result to the country from the work of this mine, has spent enormous sums in the endeavour to make a port out of Ballycastle, but the tide is so strong and carries so much sand that the port is entirely killed up, so that there is no water in it even at high tide.

I followed the shore from the coal mine to the point of Fair Head, and, climbing the rocks by a goat path, I arrived with much trouble at the top, where the scene which lay before me amply recompensed me for my pains. The Causeway is praised with reason, the regularity of the columns is something surprising ; but here the pillars of basalt are nearly six hundred feet high, and some of them stand out separate from the body of the mountain, at a distance of two, three, or four feet, clear from top to bottom, sustained only by a few stones in the middle. At a little distance from the edge of the precipice there are crevices, and from throwing a stone down any of these, it is made clear that they extend to the foot of the mountain.

From place to place hollows are observable, which seem at one time to have served as river or torrent beds ; the slope is always regular from the sea to two little lakes at some distance in the peninsula. From this I took it that formerly the cape or Head extended much farther out to sea, and that perhaps there was even a country beyond, and considerable mountains which supplied the water which filled these channels. This observation is justified by the frequent fall of these separate pillars, and even by the fall of portions of the principal mass. The young men of Ballycastle have assured me that they have ridden twelve or fifteen feet beyond what is now the face of the precipice. This agrees with say famous Connemara theory. It is so diverting to dream and theorise that I return to the task frequently. If I dare to continue, I would say that in the course of centuries this cape of Fair Head will entirely disappear, and the ocean will open for itself a wider passage into the Irish Sea.

The tidal current here is extremely rapid. It can be seen from the top of Fair Head, running like a torrent, sometimes from the ocean to the Irish Sea, and some-times from the Irish Sea to the ocean. Scotland seems very near, but Fair Head does not exactly point to it. According to my Connemara theory, there must always have been a strait between the two, and afterwards an immense gulf extending westward to Greenland.

After having conceived, written, and even printed all the beautiful reflections, dreams, and theories presented to the reader when I was speaking of Connemara, I had the misfortune to read in the ‘Vindication of the Ancient History of Ireland ‘ by General Vallencey, that others have amused themselves in exactly the same way, and have drawn conclusions almost similar to mine, among others Messrs. Whitehurst and Hamilton. The two are not exactly in agreement as to the rocks near the Giant’s Causeway ; they do agree in saying that an immense territory must have been swallowed up by the sea, with the volcano which supplied the basalt of which the pillars are made.
“Add to this” says General Vallencey, “the tradition of the ancient Irish that a great part of the Island has been swallowed up by the sea. The peasants believe that at times portions of this rise above the waders to the north-west of Ireland. The inhabitants of these parts give to these appearing lands the name of ‘Tir Huddy,’ or the country of Hudd. They say that they contained a city, formerly possessing immense riches, and that the key of this city was buried under a certain altar of the Druids.”
The General, always thinking of his theory of Ireland peopled by tribes from the Levant, adds : “This city is evidently the lost city of the Arabs mentioned in the preface of the Alcoran and visited. by their false prophet Hudd.”
What is still more cruel for a theory-spinner is that, in the comparison which the General makes between the Japanese, the Peruvians, and the Irish, I have found that a certain Varinius said exactly what I have thought out. A certain Bertius also asserts that the Deluge of Deucalion has been wrongly placed in Thessaly, and that it belongs to the coast of Scotland or Caledonia, as it should be called because ‘Dur’ in Irish means water, and ‘Deucalion’ is a corruption of ‘Dur Caledonia’ the Deluge of Caledonia

It is such a terrible thing to find one’s pet theories appropriated in this way that I have determined never more to make any, or, at any rate, never again to read the books of those who have made theories like mine. It is Some satisfaction, however to find that the opinions of these gentlemen give weight to the theories of my invention.

Notes by Author:
1. See Journals of the Chamber of Commerce on Importation and Exportation, the Reports from the Customs, and the calculations of Arthur Young at the end of his book on Ireland.
2. The Anglican Bishops wear as a mark of their dignity, a small petticoat which descends only to the knees, and which is like what is worn by the Higlanders of Scotland, but with this exception, that in the case of the bishops, breeches are worn below – Note by Author

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Mrs. Mary Stone of Cushendall, Co. Antrim

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Written by Jack McCann.

“Mary Stone died on the 6th of April, 1977. Word of her death sent my thoughts jostling down the years, past ghost and ghost, to sunlit summer holidays, pictuire-postcard clear. Nothing much happened in our quiet corner of Red Bay. The tides came and went. It was all so peaceful; so personal too, even the char-a-bancs had names – like Henry McNeill’s — ‘Maid of the Mountains.’

A two mile walk to Cushendall was worth every step of the way to linger and look around in Mrs. Stone’s shop, with all the time in the world to decide what our coppers would best buy, while she talked history with the grown-ups; not the ‘far foreign fields’ stuff we were reading about in school but of people and places, customs.and curiosities in the wee townlands around us. She was a tourist attraction to visitors in search of ‘the quiet land of Erin …… “sure the man who wrote that air – ‘Aridicoan’ he called it – lived down Cushendun way. McCambridige was his name, a Gaelic-speaking ancestor of Lord Glentoran.”

In due time my children were swithering between her toys and toffees while I learned the local lore ….. “Did you know that a Chief Justice of England defended a woman from Waterfoot here in Cushendall…..?”

“Have you over heard tell of Ailsa McFredjin …?” “You’ll have seen the McAlaster stone in Cregagh Churchyard . . ?” “The Pope called the other day to talk about Eoin MacNeill … ” “Sean Murray was a gentleman . . .” “John Hewitt’s ‘Fame’, there’s a poem about poets for you …” “He could whistle like a blackbird, young Gore . . .” “Did I tell you about Shane the Proud and his …” “You’ll have to call back then.” And I did, again and again, to hear about MacDonnells and McQuillans, McAuleys and Turnlys, Crommelins and Breckenridges, countrymen and boleymen, raths and racing gigs.

The thought that one day it had to end prompted the idea of a local body to encourage interest in the story of the Glens. So when Mary Stone shut shop, for the last time she had the pleasure of knowing that the Glenns of Antrim Historical Society was carrying on where she left off, and that she was, its first honorary life-member.

Her last days were spent among her own in Clushendall Cottage Hospital as Glensfolk campaigned against a Ministerial decision to close it down. That they won was due in no small measure to their awareness of ‘their history’. Now Mary Stone is part of that history, part of the quiet land.”

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Emigration and Education Statistics, 1931, Co. Antrim

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Description from Thom’s Directory, 1931.

Antrim
is a maritime county in the province of Ulster, it is bounded
on the north by the Atlantic ocean, on the east by the Northern
Channel, on the south by Belfast Lough, which it shares as far
as mid-water with County Down and on the west by Co. Derry (Londonderry).
The length of county Antrim from the “new bridge”
over the river Lagan near Lisburn to the Giant’s Causeway is
54.5 miles; and it’s breadth from Island Magee to Toome on the
river Bann is 30 miles.

NAME
AND FORMER DIVISIONS

The counties name is derived from the town of Antrim and probably
means “one tribe” or “one habitation”. The
northern part of the county was the ancient territory of Dalriada,
commonly called the Route; all south of that was part of the old
territory of Dalriada; this latter part was in later ages called
North Clannaboy, to distinguish it from South Clannaboy in Co.
Down, both of which formed the territory of the O’Neills. The
district along the coast from Larne to Ballycastle was the territory
of the MacDonnells and it is now known as “The Glens of Antrim”
which are named after the streams that run through them as follows:-
Glenshesk, Glendun, Glencorp, Glenaan,
Glenballyemon, Glenariff, Glencloy and Glenarm.

PHYSICAL
FEATURES

As regards minerals in the county, the sub-soil is basalt or trap,
which forms the Giant’s causesway on the north coast, clay-slate
and limestone; there was coal at Ballycastle, and salt mines near
Carrickfergus; and iron ore in the hill region extending from
Larne to Cushendall.
The ore was shipped from Larne, Glenarm, Carnlough and Red Bay
to the ports of Cumberland, Wales and Clyde. There are numerous
large bogs in the county.

The
chief mountain summits in the county with their height in feet
are: Slemish (1,437) near Ballymena; Trostan (1,811),
Slieveanee (1,782), Slieveanorra (1,676) and Slievenahaghan
(1,325), around Cushendall: Aganarrive (1,225) and
Crockaneel (1,321), west of Cushendun; Knocklayd
(1,695), a detached peak near Ballycastle; Collin Top (1,426),
Carncormick (1,431) and Soarns Hill (1,326) near
Glenarm; Divis (1,561), Black Mountain (1,272),
Squire’s Hill (1,230) and Cave Hill (1,188) near
Belfast; Carnhill (1,025) and Toppin (928) near
Carrickfergus.

The
chief headlands coming from the north are Bengore Head
which includes the Giant’s Causeway, Kinbane or
Whitehead
, Benmore or Fair Head, Torr Head,
Garron Point, Ballygaley Head, The Gobbins,
Black Head and White Head which is near Carrickfergus.
The islands along the coast also from the north are Rathlin; the
Skerries near Portrush; Maidens near Larne; and Muck Island off
Island Magee.

The
Bays and Harbours are: Belfast Lough between Antrim and
Down; Larne Lough (an inlet 5 miles long and bounded on
the east by the peninsula of Island Magee); and the Bays of Ballygalley,
Glenarm, Carnlough, Red, Murlough, Ballycastle
and White Park.

Lighthouses
were located at Maiden Rocks (opposite Larne Harbour);
Black Head; and Altacarry Head (north-east of Rathlin
Island).

The
principal rivers are the Bann, which for 27 miles forms
the boundary between Antrim and Derry; the Lagan for about
22 miles forms the southern boundary; the Six-Mile-Water
flowing into Lough Neagh near Antrim town. Larne Water
which flows into the sea at Larne; the Main river flowing
into Lough Neagh below Randalstown receives the waters of the
Glenwhirry and Kells rivers, also those of the river
Braid on which stands Ballymena. The Glenravel Water
and the Clogh river are also found in Antrim. The Bush
river enters the sea near the Giant’s Causeway. The river Carey
runs into the sea at Ballycastle, and the streams running through
the Glens of Antrim reach the sea at different points along the
east coast.

The
principal Lakes are Lough Neagh; Lough Beg is an
expansion of the river Bann, lying north of Lough Neagh; Lough
Guile
is near Ballymoney; Portmore Lake is close to
Lough Neagh and Lough Mourne is found to the north of Carrickfergus.

The Lagan canal connects Lough Neagh with Belfast Lough.

FAMILIES
AND HOUSES, 1926

There were 42,477 families in the county according to the 1926
Census for Ireland, the average number in each family was 4.48.
The number of ‘inhabited houses’ was 41,896 with an average of
4.54 persons to each house. The Special Inmates of Public institutions
are omitted from these figures.

There
were in the county 25,680 ‘Occupiers’ or ‘Heads of Families’ who
were in occupation of less than five rooms, this was 61.6% of
the total for the county. Of these, 849 or 2% occupied one room;
6,549 or 15.7% occupied two rooms; 7,716 or 18.3% occupied three
rooms; and 10,666 or 25.6% were in ocupation of four rooms.

There
were 374 tenements in the county in which the room had only one
occupant at that time; 375 cases where the room had two, three
or four occupants; 81 cases in which there were five, six or seven
occupants to one room, and 19 cases where the occupants of one
room exceeded 7 in number, including three cases where ten persons
occupied the same room.

ANALYSIS
OF THE CENSUS FOR COUNTY ANTRIM, 1821-1926

Year Males Females Total
Pop.
1821 111,572 122,034 233,606
1831 131,727 140,601 272,328
1841 137,533 148,034 285,567
1851 124,778 135,125 259,903
1861 122,491 134,495 256,986
1871 117,003 128,755 245,758
1881 113,464 124,274 237,738
1891 102,689 112,540 215,229
1901 94,087 102,003 196,090
1911 93,651 100,213 193,864
1926 92,596 99,047 191,643

EDUCATION

In 1911 there were in county Antrim, 157,812 people aged 9 and
upwards; of these 141,944 or 90% could read and write; 7,606 or
4.8% could read only and 8,262 or 5.2% were illiterate. As that
census was the first for which the age for consideration had been
raised from 5 years to 9 years, no comparison can be made with
figures from earlier censuses. But – the percentage of those of
five years and upwards who were unable to read and write in 1891
was 9%. By 1901 this figure was listed as 8% and in 1911 it had
fallen to 7.9%

IRISH
SPEAKING (1861-1911)

No.
of people
1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911
Irish
only
11 14 27 0 0 0
Irish
& English
1,911 464 1,481 894 1,012 2,724
Irish Total 1,922 478 1,508 894 1,012 2,724
%
of population
0.7 0.2 0.6 0.4 0.5 1.4

A point to note: there are no errors in the above table, the majority
of counties in Ireland show a similar trend in numbers of Irish
speaking people between the years 1861 and 1891. The figures given
for emigration patterns show a greater number of people emigrating
in the years 1861 and 1881 and this may account for the figures
in this table.

RELIGIONS, 1871-1926(% of population)

Religion 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1926
Presbyterian 52.0 51.3 42.1 50.77 50.14 49.5
Church
of Ireland
20.9 21.72 22.5
Roman Catholic 20.59 20.5 20.1
Methodist 1.4 1.5 3.3 1.91 1.97 2.6
Others 3.8 4.7 4.7 5.83 5.87 5.3

Note:
The figures for Church of Ireland and Roman Catholics in the
county for the years 1871, 1881 and 1891 will be included as
soon as possible.

EMIGRATION (1861-1911)

1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911
77,516 54,670 59,431 5,469 14,946 32,804

These
figures include emigrants from the City of Belfast which was
a major port of emigration for people from other counties

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Bog Burst, Randalstown, Co. Antrim, 1835

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.D.1835, September 17. Fairloch Moss, Randalstown, Co. Antrim.

(A very large bog overlooking a. valley. )- All day a portion of it swelled up till the the convexity was 30 feet in height; at 5 p.m with a sound like a loud, rushing wind, it sank several feet, and a collection of tufts, mud, and water moved N.E., not rapidly, and soon stopped. It swelled up again, and about midday on the 19th, it again burst with a similar noise and the flow crept on till the 21st. when it ceased till the 23rd, being interrupted by ditches; on the 23rd, at 3 p.m., it suddenly rushed forward. Continuing, it surrounded a cottage 10 feet deep, rose over the Belfast-Londonderry coach road, crossed it with a width of 300 yards, and poured over the far bank in a cascade, and continued down the valley till it reached the River Maine, which it dammed temporarily, and killed all the fish. The flow into the Maine did not cease till Sept. 28. The deposited area of bog was three-quarters of a mile long, and 200 to 300 yards wide; with a maximum depth of 30 feet. The place where the bog had swelled up to 30 feet, afterwards sunk 20 feet below its original level, and a small pool occupied the hollow\”

Ref: Hunter, Magazine of Natural History, vol., ix, May, 1836, pp. 251-261

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