Category Archives: Carlow

Roman Catholic Parish Records, Townland Index, Co. Carlow, 1851

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1851 townland index for Co. Carlow based on Roman Catholic parish records.

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Emigration and Education Statistics, 1931, Co. Carlow

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Carlow county is in the province of Leinster. It is bounded on the north by Kildare and Wicklow, on the east by Wicklow and Wexford, on the south by Wexford and west by Kilkenny & Laois (Queen’s county). It’s length from the Pollmounty river on the south to the northern boundary near Rathvilly is 32.5 miles; and it’s greatest breadth from Black Bridge to Ballyredmond near Clonegal on the east is 20 miles.

NAME AND FORMER DIVISIONS

The name of the county is derived from the town of Carlow, whose old name ‘Catherloch’ means quadruple lake, the tradition being that where the town now stands, the Barrow river anciently formed four lakes of which there is now no trace. ‘Moy-fea’ was the old name of a plain lying in the Barony of Forth, and the name for this Barony was derived from Ohy Finn Fothart, who having been banished by his nephew Art, son of “”Conn of the hundred Battles”” proceeded to Leinster. The King of Leinster bestowed certain districts upon him and his sons. Hy Felimy was a tribe and district in the Barony of Rathvilly; the tribe of Hy Drona gave its name to a territory part in Carlow and part in Kilkenny now represented by the Baronies of Idrone.

PHYSICAL FEATURES

The eastern half and parts of the west of the county produces fine granite for building. The Coal was mined in castlecomer in Co. Kilkenny which adjoins Carlow on the western side. ‘Carlow flags’ derived from a species of sandstone which splits into layers are ‘mined’ close to the Castlecomer coal fields. Nearly the whole county is level, and is generally fertile and well cultivated. On the south, east and extreme west, the county is skirted by mountains.These mountins with their heights in feet are as follows: Mount Leinster and the Blackstairs Mountains run for about 16 miles on the border of Carlow and Wexford. Greenoge (1,399) and Kilgrannish (1,335) are within the county. South of Kilgrannish is the Gap of Corrabut, running between this hill and Mount Leinster (2,610); Knockroe (1,746), is two miles farther south. South of this is Scullogue Gap, separating Mount Leinster from Blackstairs (2,409) which lies on the county boundary. The Rivers on the west are the Barrow, which for five miles forms the boundary between Carlow and Laois(Queen’s Co./Leix), and then flows through Carlow for 11 miles and for 19 miles more forms the boundary between counties Carlow and Kilkenny. On the east, the Slaney runs south for 18 miles through the county, and for 3 miles more it forms the boundary between counties Carlow and Wexford. It then enters Wexford. The Burren River rises north of Mount Leinster and flowing through the middle of the county joins the Barrow at Carlow from the county of Kilkenny. The Derreen entering Carlow from Wicklow, joins the Slaney 3 miles below Tullow. The Clody rises in Mount Leinster, and joins the Slaney at Newtownbarry, running the whole way on the boundary between Carlow and Wexford. The staple trade of county Carlow was corn, flour, meal, butter and provisions which were exported in large quantities.

FAMILIES AND HOUSES, 1926

There were 5,448 families in the county according to the 1926 Census for Ireland, the average number in each family being 4.3. The number of ‘inhabited houses’ was 7,420, with an average of 4.6 persons to each house. The Special Inmates of Public institutions are omitted from these figures. There were in the county 5,201 ‘Occupiers’ or ‘Heads of Families’ who were in occupation of less than five rooms, this was 95.4% of the total for the whole county. Of these 215, or 3.9% occupied one room; 1,394 or 25.6% occupied two rooms; 1,560 or 28.6%, occupied three rooms; and 2,032 or 37.3% were in occupation of four rooms. There were 96 tenements in the county, in which the room had only one occupant at that time; 98 cases where the room had two, three or four occupants; 18 cases in which there were five, six or seven occupants and three cases where the occupants of one room exceeded 7 in number, including one case where ten persons occupied the same room.

ANALYSIS OF THE CENSUS FOR COUNTY CARLOW, 1821-1926

Year Males Females Total Pop.
1821 38,821 40,131 78,952
1831 40,149 41,839 81,988
1841 42,428 43,800 86,228
1851 33,016 35,062 68,078
1861 28,139 28,998 57,137
1871 25,464 26,186 51,650
1881 23,078 23,490 46,568
1891 20,552 20,384 40,936
1901 19,009 18,739 37,748
1911 18,481 17,771 36,252
1926 17,802 16,702 34,476

EDUCATION

In 1911, there were in the county 30,138 people aged 9 years and upwards; of these 26,972 or 89.4% could read and write; 970 or 3.2% could read only; and 2,241 or 7.4% were illiterate. As that census was the first for which the age for consideration had been raised from 5 years to 9 years, no comparison can be made with figures from earlier censuses. But – the percentage of those of five years and upwards who were unable to read and write in 1891 was 15.4%. By 1901 this figure was listed as 11.3% and in 1911 had fallen to 9.8%.

IRISH SPEAKING (1861-1911)

No. of people 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911
Irish only 0 3 1 0 0 0
Irish & English 124 127 192 123 222 1,008
Irish Total 124 130 193 123 222 1,008
% of population 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.6 2.8

RELIGIONS, 1871-1926(% of population)

Religion 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1926
Presbyterian 0.3 0.20 0.30 0.44 0.34 0.28
Church of Ireland 10.9 10.8 10.9 10.45 9.93 7.97
Roman Catholic 88.3 88.5 88.3 88.48 89.15 91.34
Methodist 0.30 0.30 0.40 0.52 0.43 0.32
Others 0.20 0.20 0.10 0.11 0.15 0.19

EMIGRATION (1861-1911)

1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911
10,713 5,405 5,440 8,064 8,408 2,428
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Tithe Applotment Book, Barragh, Co. Carlow

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Tithe Applotment Books (TAB) – Co. Carlow – Ireland
Barragh Civil Parish – Baronies of Forth and St. Mullins, Upper
Union of Carlow, Enniscorthy and Shillelagh
Tithe Applotment Books Name Index
7th Jan, 1825
NAI film ref: #3/45 : MFA film ref: #53/2

The names of the people who leased property in Barragh Civil Parish, Co. Carlow are listed alphabetically below, with the name of the townland. The TAB for this parish is reasonably easy to read, you will see some questionmarks as to spellings. The surname Molton may in fact be Mollon or vice versa as the ‘t’ was crossed in some places and did not seem to be in others. In some instances when a person was leasing a second plot in the same townland there is a note which will say mountain, bog, plantation or house & garden. Other than this, the information supplied in the TAB is the acreage and the value.

Some of the townland names have not been identified as per the spelling if it was that in 1851. Some of the townlands listed as being part of Barragh Civil Parish in 1825 belonged to Ardoyne Civil Parish by 1851

Barragh Civil Parish belongs to the Civil Registration Districts of Carlow, Enniscorthy and Shillelagh for the purpose of Birth, Marriage, Death & Census records.

The Tithe Applotment Books Fiche references for Barragh Civil Parish is NAI film ref: #3/45 : MFA film ref: #53/2

There was a Church yard in Lackabeg, a Chapel yard in Crowsgrove and School House Land in Barnhask.

NameSurname of OccupantTitleTownlandNo.         
CaptainButlerArdattin
JosephAnnesleyArdattin
ValentineFoleyArdattin
JamesDoyleArdattin
PeterTracyArdattin
CaptainBrowneBallypierce
CaptainBrowneBallypierceMountain
PhilipButlerBallypierce
LukeDoyleBallypierce
GeorgeWillisBallypierce
JacobWillisBallypierce
SamuelWillisBallypierce
SamuelWillisBallypierceMountain
DanlMcDanielBallypierce
JohnNowlanBallypierce
GeorgePriseBallypierce
BryanByrneBallypierce
DenisWaduckBallypierce
MylesRedmondBallypierce
TimothyRedmondBallypierce
WidowTownsendBallypierce
MichaelRyanBallypierce
JohnGahanBallypierce
LawrenceCooganBallypierce
MichaelDawsonBallypierce
PeterKirwanBallypierce
LoughlinEva?rs or EvansBallypierce
ThomasDevereuxBallypierce
MichlWhittyBallypierce
ThomasRathwele orRathwellBarnhask
JamesWatersBarnhask
WilliamLevistonBarnhask
JamesRathwele orRathwellBarnhask
SamlRathwele orRathwellBarnhask
PeterDoyleBarnhask
MichlFitzpatrickBarnhask
DenisKellyBarnhask
DenisKellyBarnhaskin Do
HenrySteelBarnhask
GeorgeHollowBarnhask
JohnPowerBarnhask
WilliamLennonBarnhask
ThomasBernardBarnhask
JoshuaRobertsBarnhask
JohnnugentBarnhask
WidowNowlanBarnhask
JohnByrneBarnhask
John?MollonBarnhask
Robert?MollonBarnhask
MathewRobertsBarnhask
CathFarrellBarnhask
WillMcEvoyBarnhask
MauriceFenlonBarnhask
James?MollonBarnhask
James?MollonBarnhaskin Do
?SamlJacobBarnhask
JosephJacobBarnhask
BartholmDoyleBarnhask
Anne?HuggotBarnhask
JohnKellyBarnhask
School House landBarnhask
Capt.BrowneBunagurra
Thos.MagrathBunagurra
MichlFitzpatrickBarnhask
AnneMurphyBarnhask
Thos.BryanBarnhask
SamlPowerBarnhask
FrancisTobinBarnhask
PatkKavanaghBuggan
MartinCarthyBuggan
OwenKennedyBuggan
LukeNowlanBuggan
JohnNowlanBuggan
JohnByrneBuggan
PhilipButlerBarragh
JohnMurphyBarragh
EdwardGregoryBarragh
JamesKinsellaBally Keeneen
PatkNowlanBally Keeneen
PatkLawlerBally Keeneen
PatkToolBally Keeneen
JohnKellyBally Keeneen
Thos.RedmondBally Keeneen
J?as.FitzpatrickBally Keeneen
Thos.HynesBally Keeneen
PatkMurphyBally Keeneen
JohnCarroleBally Keeneen
PatkMurphyBally Keeneen
ThomasGregoryBallinvally
ThomasGregoryBallinvallyin Do
ThomasByrneBallinvally
WidowKirwanBallinvally
JohnKirwanBallinvally
DominickKirivanBallinvally
JohnDempseyBallinvally
JamesDempseyBallinvally
PatkHoganBallinvally
PatkHoganBallinvallyin Do
MartinHoganBallinvally
PeterDoyleBallinvally
MichlFitzpatrickBallinvally
PeterKinsellaBallinvally
Thos.Deegan& JohnBallinvally
JamesDoolingBallinvally
JohnReillyBallinvally
JohnButlerBallinvally
Thos.ColcloughBallinvally
Law.WaduckBallinvally
MathewDoyleBallinvally
PatkDoyleBallinvally
DenisDoyleBallinvally
Revd.SuttenBallyshancorra
EdwdMaloneBallyshancorra
LawrenceColmanBallyshancorra
JamesMcDonnellBallyshancorra
MathewScullyBallyshancorra
MichlScullyBallyshancorra
Thos.KennedyBallyshancorra
DenisHanlonBallyshancorra
Benj.?RickyEsqr.Ballinastraw
EdwdMcDonnellBallinastraw
PatkMcDonnellBallinastraw
EdwdDonahoeBallinastraw
WidowNeillBallinastraw
PatkIvoryBallinastraw
WidowDoyleBallinastraw
WidowMurphyBallinastraw
EdwdDonahoeBallinastraw
EdwdMcDonnellBallinastraw
HughMcDonnellBallinastraw
JamesMcDonnellBallinastraw
MichlDoyleBallinastraw
JamesLyonsBallinastraw
JohnMurphyBallinastraw
Thos.PierceBallinastraw
LawDoyleBallinastraw
Thos.ButlerSirBallintemple
Thos.ButlerSirBallintempleWoodland
JonathanPayneBallintemple
JonathanPayneBallintempleWoodland
JohnNeillBallintemple
LawDonohoeBallintemple
PatkDoyleBallintemple
WidowSmithBallintemple
MathewTobinBallintemple
Thos.DonohoeBallintemple
WillmGillasbyBallintemple
RogerPierceBallintemple
JamesKainBallintemple
PatkKainBallintemple
MichlMouranBallintemple
JohnLyonsBallintemple
HenryMoodyBallintemple
TimothyWalshBallintemple
RobtSallengerBallintemple
Thos.ByrneBallintemple
TimothyWalshjun.Ballintemple
Capt.ButlerBromvill
EdwdJonesBromvill
WidowPenderBallintemple
Capt.DurdinCranemore
Capt.DurdinCranemoreMountain
Capt.DurdinCranemorePlantation
JosephKiddCranemore
?& EvansKirwanCranemore
?& EvansKirwanCranemoreMountain
SilvsKinsellaCranemore
SilvsKinsellaCranemoreMountain
JohnKinsellaCranemore
JohnKinsellaCranemoreMountain
JohnRyanCranemore
CathDobbsCranemore
PatkCorryCranemore
PatkCorryCranemoreMountain
WilmBurgessCranemore
WilmBurgessCranemoreMountain
PhilipRocheCranemore
PhilipRocheCranemoreMountain
MartinRyanCranemore
MartinRyanCranemoreMountain
JohnByrneCranemore
JohnByrneCranemoreMountain
MathKavanaghCranemore
MichlHaydnCranemore
PatkHaydnCranemore
PatkHaydnCranemorein Do
JamesGriffithCranemore
MichlCarthyCranemore
PatkLordanCranemore
DenisHoganCranemore
MartinHoganCranemore
JosephRevellCranemore
MaryWaduckCranemore
JohnMcCondryCranemore
WmRedmondCranemore
PeterNowlanCranemore
PhilipHickyCranemore
Thos.MurphyCranemore
Thos.MurphyCranemoreMountain
JamesDoyleCranemore
JamesDoyleCranemoreMountain
MajorCornwallCranemore
AndrewRyanCranemore
AndrewRyanCranemoreMountain
CathKavanaghCranemore
CathKavanaghCranemoreMountain
JohnKavanaghCranemore
JohnKavanaghCranemoreMountain
RichdDevereuxCranemore
RichdDevereuxCranemoreMountain
JohnKavanaghCranemore
JohnKavanaghCranemoreMountain
RichdByrneCranemore
PatkGlynchCranemore
WmGlynchCranemore
WidowPowerClenmullin
JacobPowerClenmullin
JosephJacobClenmullin
SamlJacobClenmullin
Thos.Jacob& JosephClenmullin
JamesMoltonClenmullin
RobtMoltonClenmullin
RuthCommerfortClenmullin
JamesDunnClenmullin
RichdGreganClenmullin
JacobPowerjun.Clenmullin
WmFarrellClenmullin
DenisDempseyClenmullin
JohnGregan& Robt.Clenmullin
JohnSwayneClenmullin
LordFarnhamCarrigduff
LordFarnhamCarrigduffWoodland
Capt.KerrCarrigduff
WmBarkeryCarrigduff
JohnGregan& Robt.Carrigduff
JohnGregan& Robt.CarrigduffHouse & garden
HughByrneCarrigduff
JohnCowmanCarrigduff
Thos.RalphCarrigduff
Thos.RalphCarrigduffin Do
MosesCurranCarrigduff
RichdGreganCarrigduff
RichdGreganCarrigduffin Do
RichdGreganCarrigduffHouse & garden
JamesDunneCarrigduff
JamesDunneCarrigduffHouse & garden
MartinHughesCarrigduff
JoshuaLangfordCarrigduff
JoshuaLangfordCarrigduffHouse & garden
WmBrandyCarrigduff
JamesByrneCarrigduff
RichdWestCarrigduff
WidowBirchCarrigduff
HumphryBealCarrigduff
BenjmBailCarrigduff
Thos.HughesCarrigduff
PatkScullyCarrigduff
PatkScullyCarrigduffHouse & garden
JamesBrennanCarrigduff
JamesBrennanCarrigduffHouse & garden
RichdHazlewoodCarrigduff
WidowEarlCarrigduff
JamesMurphyCarrigduff
MosesMagrathCarrigduff
WmKellyCarrigduff
WilliamDevi?ttCarrigduff
DanielRalphCarrigduff
JohnKinchCarrigduff
AbyReddickCarrigduff
GeorgeBerryCarrigduff
HughGeehanCarrigduff
WmWillkinsonCarrigduff
JamesCarthyCarrigduff
JohnDillonCarrigduff
Thos.GillansCarrigduff
PeterLawlorCarrigduff
JohnChapmanCarrigduff
PatkKehoeCarrigduff
WmCaseyCarrigduff
MichlButlerCarrigduff
JohnKennedyCarrigduff
JohnDoyleCarrigduff
WidowMurphyCarrigduff
WidowDormanCarrigduff
BenjmGriffithCarrigg
JamesMurphyCarrigg
MichlLyonsCarrigg
JamesBryanCarrigg
PatkFarrellCarrigg
PatkFarrelljun.Carrigg
JohnFarrellCarrigg
JamesnugentCrowsgrove
RichdnugentCrowsgrove
FrancisRyanCrowsgrove
FrancisRyanCrowsgrovein Do
JamesRyanCrowsgrove
JamesRyanCrowsgrovein Do
MartinBryanCrowsgrove
JohnRedmondCrowsgrove
PatkConnorsCrowsgrove
JohnConnorsCrowsgrove
GeorgeColemanCrowsgrove
EdwdSynottCrowsgrove
MichlConnorsCrowsgrove
Thos.FenlonCrowsgrove
BryanMurphyCrowsgrove
RobtYoungCrowsgrove
Chapel YardCrowsgrove
MosesDoyleCloneleaugh
Thos.DoyleCloneleaugh
Thos.Doylejun.Cloneleaugh
WmMcDonnellCloneleaugh
PatkDonohoeCloneleaugh
??NowlanCloneleaugh
PeterByrneCrane
PeterByrneCranein Do
MichlByrneCrane
ChasMurphyCrane
WidowMurphyCrane
JohnBoulgerCrane
EdwdHanlonCrane
EdwdHanlonCranein Do
JamesMurphyCrane
LawceByrneCrane
CathFoleyCrane
PatkRowenCrane
JosephDoyleCrane
MichlByrneCrane
MichlFoleyCrane
DanlByrneCrane
WidowRedmondCrane
MartinRyanCrane
WmSynottCrane
WmBarkerCrane
JosephBarkerCrane
MathewHughesCrane
JamesnugentCrane
WidowOwensCrane
MartinKavanaghCrane
RobtEustaceEsq.Cranes
MichlMcDonnellCranes
JamesDoyleCranes
MichlDoyleCranes
PatkDoyleCranes
PeterTracyCranes
ThomasCoeCranes
JasNowlan& ThosCranes
EdwdDoyleCranes
AndrewMyresCranes
MichlSha?rmonjun.Cranes
JamesDonohoeCranes
PatkCosgrave& ThosCranes
Thos.JacksonCranes
JohnLegateCranes
BenjmJacksonCranes
WmJacksonCranes
MichlNeillCranes
MichlDonohoeCranes
PatkFlemingCranes
JohnFlemingCranes
TimothyDoyleCranes
CharlesNeilCranes
Thos.HamiltonCranes
PatkLennonCranes
JamesHowletCranes
MichlByrneCranes
MichlLennonCranes
AlleyCosgraveCranes
Thos.BroughanCalledan
WalterDoyleCalledan
RobtMcCreaCalledan
NicholasYoungCalledan
JohnKehoeCalledan
LordFarnhamKillbranish
WmLangfordKillbranish
WmLangfordKillbranishMountain
JohnDooleyKillbranish
LawceDooleyKillbranish
PatkDooleyKillbranish
DarbyKavanaghKillbranish
DarbyKavanaghKillbranishMountain
JohnMoltonKillbranish
JohnMoltonKillbranishMountain
RobtMoltonKillbranish
RobtMoltonKillbranishMountain
RichdKellyKillbranish
RichdKellyKillbranishMountain
PatkKellyKillbranish
PatkKellyKillbranishMountain
JamesKellyKillbranish
JamesKellyKillbranishMountain
P.Kelly& JohnKillbranish
P.Kelly& JohnKillbranishMountain
PatkHendrickKillbranish
PatkHendrickKillbranishMountain
MorgHandrickKillbranish
MorgHandrickKillbranishMountain
JohnHandrickKillbranish
JohnHandrickKillbranishMountain
JohnDoyleKillbranish
JohnDoyleKillbranishMountain
MathewDoyleKillbranish
MathewDoyleKillbranishMountain
GeorgeKeysKillbranish
GeorgeKeysKillbranishMountain
RogerPlunkettKillbranish
RogerPlunkettKillbranishMountain
JohnKinchKillbranish
PatkFitzpatrickKillbranish
JohnRathwellKillbranish
WilliamKinchKillbranish
StephenConnorsKillbranish
WilliamRobertsKillbranish
CathDunneKillbranish
MosesDunneKillbranish
PatkDunneKillbranish
PhilipEganKillbranish
LukePlunkettKillbranish
Thos.PlunkettKillbranish
GeorgeNorrisKillbranish
WmMoltonKillbranish
RobtLewisKillbranish
WmButlerKillbranish
JamesConnorsKillbranish
JamesQuinnKillbranish
RogerPlunkettKillbranish
JosephJacobKillbranish
SamlJacobKillbranish
WidowPowerKillbranish
JacobPowerKillbranish
JamesMoltonKillbranish
ThomasRalphKillbranish
RogerGrinnenKillbranish
?SarsColchloughEsq.Kildavin
CounsellorSwanKildavin
JamesDoyleKildavin
JohnGif?efKildavin
PatkKennedyKildavin
GarrettnugentKildavin
JamesDoranKildavin
JohnConnorsKildavin
JohnHoreKildavin
GeorgePriseKildavin
GeorgeBaileyEsq.Kilbride
GeorgeKeoughEsq.Kilbride
BryanKavanaghKilbride
JohnPowerKilbride
RobtCollierKilbride
EdwdMurphyKilbride
And.RedmondKilbride
LawceDonohoeKilbride
JohnNeillKilbride
JohnWilsonKilbride
WilliamHickyKilbride
KearyKavanaghKilbride
JohnFitzpatrickKilbride
MichlHickyKilbride
OwenFitzpatrickKilbride
DanFitzpatrickKilbride
MichlFitzpatrickKilbride
ThomasKehoeKilbride
WilliamPierceKillgreney
HenryPierceKillgreney
WilliamPowerKillgreney
WidowDonohoeKillgreney
LawceFitzpatrickKillgreney
Thos.NowlanKillgreney
Thos.MurphyKillgreney
JamesTobinKillgreney
Revd.?SullinLackabeg
EdwdSynottLackabeg
JamesRyanLackabeg
BryanMurphyLackabeg
GeorgeColemanLackabeg
EdwdDoyleLackabeg
EdwdMaloneLackabeg
JohnHarrisLackabeg
MichlScullyLackabeg
PatkKavanaghLackabeg
DenisKavanaghLackabeg
PatkRocheLackabeg
Thos.HoganLackabeg
ChurchyardLackabeg
JohnJamesMoneygrath
DenisMurrayMoneygrath
MichlBourkeMoneygrath
WmBaileyMoneygrath
AbyBaileyMoneygrath
ArtMurphyMilltown
JohnMurphyMilltown
LawceKellyMilltown
PatkBrophyMilltown
Thos.NowlanMilltown
JamesBrophyMilltown
M.Fitzpatrick& JohnMilltown
JohnNowlanMilltown
PatkPenderMilltown
JohnJacobNewpark
SamlJacob& JohnNewpark
WidowByrneNewpark
MaryMauriceNewpark
JohnRathwellNewpark
MosesFortuneNewpark
MichlFitzpatrickNewpark
Thos.KavanaghNewpark
M.Bryan& ThosNockbarragh
ChrisoBryanNockbarragh
JamesMurphyNockbarragh
DanielByrneNockbarragh
MichlKellyNockbarragh
R GeorgeKeough(R or K)Nockdurish
JohnRiceNockdurish
BryanLennonNockdurish
PatkMurphyNockdurish
PatkMcGurkNockdurish
JohnTobinNockdurish
JohnDixonNockdurish
MartinReddyNockdurish
Benjm?HickyEsq.NewtownCould be Ricky?
RobtAnnesleyNewtown
BarnabyPewNewtown
WilliamAbeyNewtown
JohnLegateNocknotubert
WmMarshalNocknotubert
PatkFoleyNocknotubert
JohnRoneyNocknotubert
TerenceDoyleNocknotubert
ChasKavanaghNocknotubert
PatkMcGillNocknotubert
WmMyresNocknotubert
JohnTreeNocknotubert
MichlTracyNocknotubert
RobtEustaceEsq.Newstown
MichlMurphyNewstown
MauFoleyNewstown
EdwdDoyleNewstown
JohnKennyNewstown
JacobPowerOldpark
SamlPowerOldpark
DanlMcDonnellOldpark
PatkFitzpatrickOldpark
TimothyHoseyOldpark
Thos.FoleyOldpark
GarrettCarthyOldpark
LawceCanavanOldpark
JamesMcGrathOldpark
MosesRyanOldpark
RogerGrinnenOldpark
Thos.RalphOldpark
RogerGrinnenOldpark
WidowByrneOldpark
MosesRyanOldpark
SamlWebbOldpark
WidowDoyleOldpark
PatkKennyOldpark
JasMcGrathOldpark
PatkLennonOldpark
JohnRalphOldpark
ThomasByrneOldpark
WidowBurkOldpark
Murth?eaByrneOldpark
RichdButlerRaheen
PhilipDeeganRaheen
PatkDoyleRaheen
JohnDoyleRaheen
WidowKellyRaheen
Thos.MaherRaheen
EdwdMaloneRaheen
PatkFenlonRatheera
JohnRocheRatheera
PatkRocheRatheera
Thos.CosgraveRatheera
JamesFarrellRatheera
Thos.FarrellRatheera
HughByrneRatheera
RobtEustaceEsq.Rathvarine
PatkDonohoeRathvarine
JohnDonohoeRathvarine
PatkKellyRathvarine
Thos.LyonsRathvarine
JasBrennanRathvarine
EdwdByrneRathvarine
DanlFoleyRathvarine
ChasKavanaghRathvarine
PatkNowlanRathvarine
WidowBrophyRathvarine
PatkMaherRathvarine
PhilipButlerSherwood
JamesMoranSherwood
JamesMoranSherwoodin Do
JohnLoughlinSherwood
MarksMurphySherwood
PatkRiceSherwood
WilliamKehoe& JamesSherwood
MaryKehoeSherwood
LawceDoolingSherwood
PatkKennedySherwood
OliverCodySherwood
PatkBilletSherwood
BarthlRyanSherwood
JohnKavanagh& Coleman, EdwdSherwood
MathKavanaghSherwood
JohnButlerSherwood
JohnReillySherwood
Thos.MaherSherwood
PatkKavanaghSherwood
CathRyanSherwood
JohnDonohoeThornhill
SilstrDonohoeThornhill

Notes re townlands and area as per the TAB

Ardattin Arable some Marshy 101a 1r 6p
Ballypierce, Arable Hill & Mountain 389a 1r
Barnhask, Arable some Rocks 290a 1r 27p
Bunnagurra, Arable Bog & Marsh 58a 1r 22p
Boggin, Arable & Marsh 98a 1r 3p
Barragh, Arable with Hill 79a 3r 37p
Ballykeeneen, Arable Bog & Marsh 214a 1r 7p
Ballinavalley, Arable with Hill 241a ?0r 5p
Ballyshancorra, Arable with Bog 184a 2r 25p
Ballinastraw, Arable Bog & Marsh 177a 3r 10p
Ballintemple, Arable Bog & Woods 549a 3r ?0p
Broomvill, Arable with Bog 164a 1r ?0p
Cranemore, Arable Hill & Mountain 847a ?0r6p
Clenmullin, Arable 17?8a 3r 35p
Carrigduff, Arable with Woods 440a 1r 22p
Carrig, Arable Bog & Hill 98a 3r 10p
Crowsgrove, Arable Hill & Rocks 262a 1r 17p
Cloneleaugh, Arable Hill & Bog 111a 3r 3p
Crane, Arable with Bog 331a 2r 15p
Calledon, Arable Land 131a ?0r 30p
Kilbranish, Arable Hill & Mountain 1817a 3r 11p
Kildavin, Arable Land 194a 1r 38p
Kilbride, Arable some Bog 431a 1r 35p
Kilgreeney, Arable & Marshy 148a 1r 19p
Lackabeg, Arable & dry land 90a 3r 19p
Moneygrath, Arable Land 55a ?0r 34p
Milltown, Arable & Bog 244a ?0r 35p
Newpark, Arable Hill & Mountain 250a ?0r 31p
Nockbarragh, Arable dry Land 98a ?0r 33p
Nockdurish, Arable & Marsh 176a 3r 28p
Newtown, Arable with Bog & rocks ?40a 1r 14p
Nockntubort Arable with Rocks 183a ?0r 22p
Newstown, Arable Land & Bog 292a 3r 18p
Oldpark, Arable Hills & Rocks 412a 2r 26p
Raheen, Arable dry Land 128a 3r 37p
Rathheera, Arable & Marshy 263a 3r 12p
Sherwood, Arable & Hill 252a 2r 35p
Thornhill, Arable& Marshy 118a

Total Amount of Acres in the Parish : 10807a 1r 14p
Total amount of Roads surveys 59a 1r 27p

Commissioners for Barragh Parish
J. Browne
Robt. Younge

January 6th, 1825

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Memorandums Made in Ireland, 1852, Co. Carlow

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Extracts from ‘Memorandums made in Ireland in the Autumn of 1852’ by John Forbes, M.D., F.R.S. Vol. I, London. Publishers: Smith, Elder & Co., Cornhill, 1853

We reached Carlow about seven o’clock, having travelled according to our post-boy’s reckoning, 35 Irish miles from Arklow. We put up at a very good inn, called the Club House. Though the country we had passed over is but little travelled, and nearly the whole tract may be regarded as a cross-country, the roads were by no means bad. Our post-chaises, to be sure, were in a rather dilapidated condition, but the horses were good, and the drivers active and obliging.

Carlow, the capital of the county of the same name, is a very handsome town, with more than the ordinary display of public buildings in good style. It contains the ruins of a fine old castle, said to have been built by the famous De Lacy in the eleventh century. One front wall and two corner towers still remain, the latter upwards of sixty feet high. A singular piece of barbarism – it may almost be called sacrilege – was committed on this beautiful ruin, within the last forty years, by a man who, from his education, ought to have had some regard for such relics of antiquity. A physician wishing to adapt the building for the purposes of a lunatic asylum, set about blasting with gunpowder some portions of the walls, and brought down about his ears more than half the structure. One cannot help wishing that it had been brought down literally about his ears. How such an act could have been permitted under the cognisance of the authorities of the town is marvellous. Both the English and the Catholic churches are remarkably fine buildings, the one surmounted by a handsome spire, the other by a still handsomer tower: the latter is the cathedral church of the Catholic dioceses of Kildare and Leighlin. There are also here a Catholic college, with a handsome chapel attached to it, and a convent; a jail, lunatic asylum, infirmary, and a very handsome court-house, only recently erected.

Carlow lies on the banks and near the union of the two rivers, the Barrow and the Burren, the former of which divides the county of Carlow from the Queen’s County (Laois). A portion of the town is situated in the latter and goes by the name of Graigue. It is connected with Carlow proper by a handsome stone bridge called Wellington Bridge. The barrow is navigable by barges down to Waterford ; and the town is now also connected by railway with Kilkenny on the one hand, and with Dublin on the other.

The population of Carlow, by the last census, was, including the suburb of Graigue, 8687, being a decrease of 1722 since 1841. The great majority of the inhabitants are Catholics. According to the official returns of 1834, the proportion of the different religions in the parish were as follows: Catholics, 7843 ; Church of England, 1755 ; Presbyterians and other dissenters, 106.

I had not time to visit any of the public institutions of Carlow, nor to make any very special inquiries into other matters. I may state however, that according to the last two Reports of the National Schools, that of Carlow had on its books in September 1850, boys, 351 ; girls, 604 ; and in September 1851, boys, 288; girls, 452.

Strong in its Catholic tendencies as Carlow is, it has its staunch Protestantism also; the stauncher, no doubt, because of the strength of these very tendencies. I here met with a most intelligent gentleman of this persuasion, who was not a whit less prejudiced and jaundiced by his Orange principles than was the small farmer and ex-soldier of Wicklow, formerly mentioned. He thought that no compromise should be made with the Catholics, and that every effort should be made to extirpate their religion at least, if not themselves. He, however, admitted that the Protestant clergy had made a great mistake in withdrawing the children of their flock from the National Schools, as they had thereby thrown all the educational advantages of this system into the hands of their opponents.

While admitting with all the world that the temperance movement of Father Matthew had done infinite good to the people in their social position, he could not refrain from deprecating it as a measure calculated to enhance the authority of the priests, and to strengthen the anti-Protestant spirit among the lower classes. From everything I have seen and heard in Ireland, I believe no imputation could be more groundless than this, and that there never was a reform undertaken with a more single eye to good than this temperance movement, incomparably the greatest efforts of modern philanthropy, after that of education.

I learned from the conversation of this gentleman, what was confirmed from various other sources subsequently, that many of the proprietors of the encumbered estates already sold, had been enabled to repossess themselves of much of their property by certain arrangements made with the principal creditors, and by borrowing money to effect the re-purchase at a depreciated value.

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St. Patrick’s College Carlow Report, 1866

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Printed by T. Price, 55 Dublin St.

“One scheme put forward by the Liberal administration in 1866 proposed to grant a supplemental charter to the Queen’s University, empowering it to examine and confer degrees on students other than those of the Queen’s colleges. A bill on these lines was introduced and carried by a narrow majority. The supplemental charter was issued but its legality was at once contested in the courts by some supporters of secular education, and an injunction was obtained setting it aside” – David Kennedy , ‘Towards a University’ , 1946, p. 56.

The conditions required in affiliated Colleges by the Senate of the Queen’s University are fulfilled by St. Patrick’s College, Carlow.

Affiliated Colleges are required to have a competent Staff of Professors instructing Students in the course of Studies prescribed by the Senate as the curriculum for a candidate for the Degree of Bachelor in Arts.

The curriculum of Studies, prescribed by the Senate of the Queen’s University, at Page 9 of their Regulations, comprises any four of the following subjects for the Degree of B.A. :-
English Language and Literature, Latin, Mathematical Sciences, Modern Continental Languages, Experimental Physics, Logic, Chemistry, Metaphysics, Zoology, History, Botany, Political Economy, Greek.

At present Carlow College has a competent Staff of Professors instructing Students in all the above subjects, except Botany and Political Economy.

If the Senate deem these subjects necessary, Professorships of Botany and Political Economy will be forthwith instituted.

The following are the Professors of St. Patrick’s College, Carlow, exclusive of the Faculty of Theology:-

Logic and Moral Philosophy, Rev. Dean Tynan.
Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, Rev. P. Fitzsimons.
Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Rev. J. Kavanagh, D.D.
Animal Physiology and Zoology, Thomas O’Mara, Esq., M.B. Ex-University Medical
Scholar, London.
Greek and Latin Languages and Literature, Rev. E. Loughrey, J. G. Conroy, Esq., J. W. Barron, Esq.
Modern History and English Literature, Rev. J. Farrell.
Ancient History and Geography, Rev. J. Colgan.
French Language, Rev. R. Coffey.
Elementary Mathematics, O’Connell Leyne, Esq.
Music, Mr. J. J. Gormley.
German and Italian Languages, Vacant.

All the Professors of Carlow College are resident, and give their labours to their professional duties exclusively except the Professors of Physiology and Drawing.

The success of the Students of Carlow College in the University of London, and the Text Books used in the Institution will I presume, be deemed satisfactory evidence as to the character of the teaching.

The curriculum of the Non-Matriculated Students of Carlow college is the course of Studies required for Matriculation in the University of London which embraces Mathematics and Algebra. including-
Progressions and Simple Equations. Geometry. The First Four Books of Euclid. Natural Philosophy. Mechanics. Hydrostatics. pneumatics. Hydraulics. Acoustics. Optics (Elementary). Heat. Chemistry. Greek and Latin Languages.

The books required for the present year are the Adelphi of Terence and the Memorabilia of Xenephon. English Language. Writing. Dictation. History .and Grammatical Structure of English History , Modern Geography, French or German Language.

The curriculum of the Matriculated Students of Carlow College is the course of studies required for the first and second B.A. examinations in the University of London: which embraces: Arithmetic and Algebra. including Logarithms and Quadratic Equations. Geometry , including the Sixth Book and part of the Eleventh Book of Euclid, plane Trigonometry , Co-ordinate Geometry , Latin Language, Roman History , English History, English Language. French or German Language, English Literature.

The subjects of the second B.A. Pass Examinations are :-
Mechanical and Natural Philosophy, treated experimentally and mathematically (See Calendar. p. 55). Statics, Dynamics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics. Pneumatics, Optics (Geometrical). Optics (Physical). Acoustics, Astronomy, Animal Physiology, Greek Language, Latin Language.

The Books for the present year are Thucydides and Cicero. History of Greece. Logic and Moral Philosophy.

On comparing this curriculum with the course of studies required at page Nine of Regulations published by the Senate of the Queen’s University, I find that this curriculum embraces all the subjects there specified except: Zoology, Botany, and political Economy, and that it includes the subjects of Animal Physiology and Astronomy, which are not required by the Regulations of the Senate of the Queen’s University.

The names of the Students of St. Patrick’s college, Carlow, who have obtained degrees in the University of London are given on Page 15 in this Report.
Since the opening of the current academic year, students are being prepared as usual in St. Patrick’s College, Carlow, for the examinations for first B.A. and second B.A. and for Matriculation in the University of London.

If the examinations for Matriculation, and for the first B.A. and second B.A., in the University of London be as difficult as the examination for the same degrees in other Universities, which is universally admitted, and which the examination papers of the several calendars sufficiently prove, the competency of the Professors of St. Patrick’s College to train for University Degrees in Arts cannot be denied or questioned, as they have sent in students to the University of London with distinguished success.

In June, 1864, a Carlow student obtained a sufficient number of marks for an exhibition, but was defeated by superior merit. In June, 1865, one Carlow student obtained honours and four passed, two having obtained first class. In June, 1866, seven Carlow students passed, four in the first class.

I am not aware that any other institution in Ireland not enjoying the privilege of a Charter, can afford more satisfactory evidence of the competency of its professors and of the character of its teaching. Text Books used in Carlow College:

English Language – Angus Adams’ Latham.
English Literature – Craik, Shaw, Hazlit, Guizot, Gervinus.
Pure Mathematics -Barnard Smith and Colenso’s Arithmetic, Todhunter’s Algebra, Todhunter’s Trigonometry, Lardner’s Euclid, Todhunter’s Conic Sections, Todhunter’s Differential and Integral Calculus.
Mixed Mathematics -Parkinson’s Mechanics, Phare’s
Hydrostatics, Parkinson’s Optics, Potter’s Physical Optics,
Herschell’s Astronomy, Gant’s Astronomy, parts I and 2,
Lardner’s acoustics.
Experimental Physics -Ganot’s Physics, Millar’s Chemical Physics.
Chemistry- Dr. Odling’s Manual of Chemistry, Williamson’s Chemistry , Millar’s Chemistry.
Logic and Moral Philosophy -Bouvier, Mill, Lafonet, Aldrich, Thompson, Hamilton.

An extensive Library is open to the students, which contains the best books of reference in Classics, Literature and History.

A distinct course of lectures is delivered and Catechetical instructions are given in all the subjects required by the curriculum, prescribed by the Senate of the Queen’s University (b).

The names of the Professors and the subjects of lectures are given at page 10 of this Report.

Sessional Examinations are held twice in each Academic year. They commence on the second Monday in December, and the second Monday in June, and each student is examined before a Board of Examiners consisting of all the Professors of the College.( 3rd condition required in affiliated colleges)

A local Examiner, sent by the Senate of the University of London, holds Provincial Examinations at Carlow College three times each year in June, for Matriculation; in July, for first B.A., and in October for second B.A. Persons who were not pupils of the College were admitted to these examinations last year .

The College has a Laboratory and a large Lecture-room provided with apparatus and appliances to teach the physical Sciences effectively.(4th condition required in affiliated colleges)

All the students of Carlow College, both ecclesiastical and secular, seek the advantage of a University Degree, and since the London University granted to the College the privilege of a local Examiner, the curriculum has been so framed that every ecclesiastical student is expected to take the degree of B.A. before he is permitted to commence his Theological Studies.

The Junior Students on the annexed list are in the preparatory school of St. Mary’s, situate in the country, two miles from the large College, under a distinct staff of masters not enumerated in the above list of Professors.

There are 190 students in Carlow College, all resident. See printed list of the names and ages of the students

Names of Professors of St. Patrick’s College, Carlow; Subjects of lectures and days on which they are given
The Rev. Patrick Bermingham, D.D. Lectures in Sacred Scripture on Mondays, Tuesdays. Thursdays and Fridays.
The Rev. James Colgan, Lectures in Canon Law, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Rev. P. Fitzsimons, Lectures in Mathematics, on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
The Rev. Thomas Tynan, Lectures in Logic and Moral Philosophy on Mondays, Tuesdays. Thursdays and Fridays.
The Rev. P. Fitzsimons, Lectures in Natural Philosophy on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Rev. J. Kavanagh. D.D., Lectures in Chemistry on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Rev. J. Farrell, Lectures in English Language and Literature on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Mr. J. G. Conroy, Lectures in Latin Language and Literature on Mondays and Tuesdays.
Mr. J. G. Conroy, Lectures in Greek Language and Literature on Thursdays and Fridays.
Mr. Joseph Farrell, Catechetical Instructions in Latin. Morning Class -Mondays, Tuesdays. Thursdays and Fridays.
Catechetical Instructions in Greek Language: Evening Class – Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
Mr. J. G. Conroy. Lectures in French Language and Literature on Wednesdays and Saturdays at morning class and in English History at evening class.
The Rev. E. Loughrey. Mondays. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, Catechetical Instructions in Latin Language, and on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Roman History and Modern Geography.
Mr. Joseph Barron. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, Catechetical Instructions in Latin Language, and on Wednesdays and Saturdays, Grecian History and Ancient Geography.
Mr. O.Connell Leyne. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Catechetical Instructions in French Language.
Thomas O’Mara, Esq.. Lectures in Animal Physiology and Zoology. on Saturdays.
Rev. F. Coffey: Cathetical Instructions in French Language on Tuesdays & Fridays
Professor of German and Italian Language – Vacant
Professor of Mathematical and Architectural Drawing: Mr. Arthur Mayne
Resident Music Master: J.J. Gormly, esq.

Names of Students who obtained Degrees

1 = First class

Surname & Name Degree
Aughney MichaelBarden Patrick E.

Barron Pierce L.

Bennet Thomas

Bermingham Patrick

Bradshaw Richard C.

Butler John

Cahill Patrick

Coghlan Thomas

Conor Albert W.

Conroy James G.

Daniel William T.

Dennehy George

Doucett Thomas

Dunne John

Dunne Michael W.

Farmer Thomas

Fitzpatrick Wlater B.

Headon William

Hearne Daniel J.

Hilly John

Keane Denis, Rev.

Kinsella W., Rev.

Lawlor James

Leyne Edward

Mannion Edward M.

McCarthy Richard V.

McCarthy Samuel

Merriman Michael

Middleton Cecil

Mulhall Edward

O’Beirne James W., Rev.

O’Donovan Alexander

O’Donovan Patrick

O’Meara Thomas

O’Sullivan Mortimer

Patterson Edward

Phelan John, Rev.

Power Thomas J., Rev.

Quinlan John

Skelly Thomas

Sugrue John H.

Taylor James I., Very Rev.

Walshe Nicholas

Whitey Esmonde

B.A.1. B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

L.L.B

B.A.

B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

1. B.A.

L.L.B

1. B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

1. B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

L.L.B

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

B.A.

Names of Students Resident in St. Patrick’s College

Surname & Name Age
Aughney MichaelBarnwall Gerald

Barron P.

Barry James

Beecham John

Beecham Patrick

Bourke Patrick

Bourke Richard

Boyle Francis

Brennan Patrick

Broughall James

Burke James

Burke James M.

Burke William

Butler M.

Byrne James

Byrne Michael

Byrne Patrick

Byrne William

Caffery Joseph

Campbell George

Campbell Richard

Campion Finton

Campion Patrick

Carroll Luke

Carroll Patrick

Casey William

Caulfield Nicholas

Clarke Denis

Clowry William

Coady Daniel

Codd John

Coffey Thomas

Collins Patrick

Comerford Peter

Conlan John

Conway James

Cooney John

Corbet Michael

Corbet Robert

Cosgrave Patrick

Crotty Francis

Cullen Gerard

Daly Thomas

Darcy Patrick

Delaney Edward

Dempsey Michael

Devereux James

Devereux Nicholas

Devereux Richard

Doherty James

Doherty Michael

Dowling Patrick

Downey John

Downey John

Doyle Thomas

Duggan Richard

Dunbar Joseph

Dunne John

Dunne Michael

Dunne Patrick

English W.

Fenlon Edward

Field Patrick

Fleming James

Flood John

Flood Thomas

Flynn Patrick

Fox Matthew

Gannan John

Gannon John

Golden John

Griffin Michael

Hayden William

Healy Patrick

Healy William

Hearn John

Hennessy Patrick

Herrernan Richard

Holohan James

Horan ????

Hughes John

Kavanagh Edward

Kavanagh Eugene

Keane Michael

Kehoe Daniel

Kelly Edward

Kelly Francis

Kelly Jeremiah

Kelly Laurence

Kenny Robert

Kent George

Kirwan James

Kirwan Michael

Lalor Thomas

Lawler Michael

Lenihan ????

Lynch Daniel

Lynch Henry

Lynch James

Lynch Michael

Lyne Maurice

Maher Hatrick (sic)

Maher Laurence

Maher P.

Maher William

Maher William

Malone Denis

Martin Terence

McAuliffe John

McCrea Joseph

McDonald ????

McElroy Bernard

McGrath John

McGuigan James

McGuigan Neil

McKenna Bernard

McKenna Laurence

McKeogh William

McLoughlin James

McNally John

McWey Simon

Molloy Patrick

Monahan James

Morris Matthew

Morris Michael

Mulholland Bernard

Neville ????

Nolan Joseph

Noonan Daniel

Noonan Joseph

O’Brien James

O’Brien James

O’Brien Patrick

O’Connor Patrick

O’Dempsey Patrick

O’Dempsey Thomas

O’Gorman Daniel

O’Kane Peter

O’Keefe Arthur

O’Keefe Joseph

O’Loughlin ????

O’Meara John

O’Meara John

O’Meara Thomas

O’Reilly Edward

Phelan James

Phelan Patrick

Phelan Patrick

Power Patrick

Power Thomas

Rea Michael

Rice Richard

Rice William

Robinson James

Ryan James

Ryan Patrick

Ryan William

Scully John

Sheehan Patrick

Shiel Patrick

Shine Alfred

Shortis William

Skelly James

Slattery Denis

Slattery John

Slattery M.

Slattery W.

Smith Bernard

Smith George

Smyth Hugh

Stanton John

Stanton Thomas

Sullivan Daniel

Tidmarsh James

Treacy Matthew

Wall Patrick

Walsh Edward

Walshe Bernard

Walshe James

Walshe Thomas

Whelan Patrick

White Frank

White Thomas

Williams Henry

Williams William

Wrafter James

Wrafter John

Wyer John

Wyer Laurence

Wyer Richard

1711

12

21

26

21

16

24

23

20

20

14

15

15

12

11

15

18

21

17

17

16

19

14

22

22

22

15

11

23

11

22

14

16

22

13

27

24

15

14

18

15

14

14

23

18

15

11

15

13

22

27

22

17

18

15

27

15

20

17

12

15

24

23

9

15

11

23

15

15

14

23

22

20

23

23

12

13

25

25

19

19

18

23

26

15

20

12

22

16

12

16

18

19

16

16

21

25

12

14

16

12

25

15

11

20

12

16

21

22

17

22

23

25

28

20

22

23

25

17

21

24

18

16

18

19

21

18

16

19

21

25

16

17

17

16

18

14

21

19

21

20

19

17

19

26

21

24

24

21

21

23

17

14

20

22

20

15

22

14

26

16

17

20

16

21

12

10

12

11

22

14

14

25

15

Not given

20

23

20

18

22

22

14

15

25

21

13

Not given

15

24

17

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Carlow News, The King’s County Chronicle

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The King’s County Chronicle

General Advertiser for the Unions of Parsonstown, Tullamore and Roscrea
Vol. 1 – No. 1
Parsonstown, Wednesday September 24, 1845

Prospectus for the King”s County Chronicle

First publication Wednesday, September 24th, 1845

Co. Carlow

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Serious Case of Stabbing
A most serious case of the above nature occurred at Carrigslaney, County Carlow, on the 14th instant, which seems to have originated in some previous quarrel. Two men, named Philip Furlong and John Williams, alias Foster had some altercation at the above place, when Furlong asked Foster to fight him. Foster said he would not fight then, but go look for a person to be present, and who would see fair play. Foster then went away, and returned in a short time by himself, having a stick in his hand and a bayonet, which he concealed under his coat. Furlong asked him was he coming back to fight him, when Foster raised the stick, and gave Furlong a blow on the head. Foster then took the bayonet from under his coat, and stabbed Furlong in the breast and lower part of the body. A man named Thomas Dowdle, who came up at this time, ran to the assistance of Furlong, when Foster stabbed him in the head, from the effects of which he now lies dangerously ill, and very little hopes are entertained of his recovery. Informations have been taken before J. J. Lecky, and C. Wolseley Esqrs., and a warrant was issued for the apprehension of Foster, who has absconded.
“Carlow Sentinel”

Attempt to Burn a House
On the 16th instant, an attempt was made by some persons unknown to burn the house of a man named Robert Jolly, who resides near Clonegall, county Carlow. The thatch was set on fire near the eave, but the family being up at the time, the fire was discovered, and its progress checked before any serious injury was committed. That the outrage was premeditated may be known from the fact that a threatening notice was posted on his house about a month previously; but as yet no clue has been obtained that would lead to the discovery of the parties who committed this outrage.
“Carlow Sentinel”

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Carlow Freeholders, 1767

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Surname & Name

Bagenal Beauchamp
Baillie Arthur – Sheriff
Barker George
Barker john
Barker John
Barker Joseph
Barker Thomas
Barret Richard
Bennett Thomas
Bernard Hodson
Bradley Richard
Brewster Henry
Brewster Samuel
Brewster William
Browne Jeff.
Browne William
Brownrigg Samuel
Burton William
Butler John
Colclough Adam
Colclough Caesar
Colclough Henry
Colclough Pat.
Colclough Richard
Colclough Samuel
Colclough Thomas
Colclough Vesey
Corragon William
Critchey Ralph
Crosbie Paul
Davis Wm.
Davison J.
Doyle Charles, jun.
Doyle Chas
Doyle William
Doyne Charles, jun.
Doyne Robert
Duckett John
Duckett Jonas
Eustace John
Evans Nath.
Fitzgerald James
Fitzgerald Thomas
Gale Anth.
Garret James
Glew James
Goggin Stephen
Greene John
Greene William
Grogan John
Gurly Thomas
Hartpole Robert
Hartson James
Hatton J.
Herring D.
Hervey F. H.
Humfrey Edw.
Humfrey John
Humfrey Mat.
James Thomas
Kavanagh gerald
keatinge Cadogan
Lecky Robert Morris
Lecky William
Surname & Name
Martin Henry
Mathers John
M’Doyle Nicholas
Mercer Luke
Mercer Simon
Michel James
Morris See Lecky
Morton George
Mottley James
Mottley Richard
Newton Bart.
Peppard See. Warren
Perkins Humphrey
Perkins John
Perkins T.
Perkins Theo.
Prichard Thomas
Pudkin William
Rudkin Henry
Russell James
Ryves Armst.
St. John Andrew
Tench John
Thomas Amyas
Vicars William
Vigors Edw.
Warren J. Peppard
Weldon Antony
Weldon Walter
Whelan John
Whelan owen

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Presbyterian (Seceders) Synod, 1833: Congregation Index

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Presbyterian (Seceders) Synod, 1833: Name Index

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The History of the Queen’s County: Cloydagh

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Extract\’s from \’The History of the Queen\’s county\’

Parish of Cloydagh

CHAPTER XVI.-PARISH OF CLOYDAGH.
This parish is situated, partly in the barony of Slievemargy, in the Queen\’s County, but chiefly in the baronies of West Idrone, and of Carlow, in the County of Carlow. The former section contains 788 a.0r 28p., and of these 245 a. 2r 33p.-a small part of Cloghgrennan are detached in the Queen\’s County, yet contiguous to the Carlow portions of the parish; while 1r. 32p. are islands in the River Barrow, which flows from north to south through it (the parish of Cloydagh is described by Mr. Thomas O\’Connor in a letter, dated Leighlin Bridge, June 20th, 1839 in \’Letters relating to the Antiquities of the County of Carlow containing information collected during the Progress of the Ordnance Survey in 1839) The Carlow barony section contains 1265 a. 2r 11p, and of this area 27 a. 1r. 32p are in the River Barrow; while the West Idrone barony section comprises 2889 a. 2r. 29p., and of this area 22 a. 0r. 8p., are islands in the River Barrow. It is also called Clody or Clogrennan, as the Clogrennan hills lying to the east and south of the Slievemargy range slope down steeply on the Queen\’s County side to the River Barrow. The principal peak is 1038 feet above the sea-level. The soil is good with limestone substratum. Coal is procured at the Bilboa colliery. The lands along the Barrow are very fertile, as are those uplands immediately near, but they become barren as you ascend the summits, from which most charming scenic effects are obtained, as in one place the elevation is considerably above the district lying eastwards.

This parish was a vicarage and a separate benefice in the diocese of Leighlin, the diocesan being the patron. Popularly, it is now called Clogrennan. Cloydagh had a residence in 1616, and it was an impropriate rectory, Keating being the vicar. The church and chancel were in good repair, and a Communion Book was possessed. That old church of this parish is now to be seen in ruins, and surrounded by a burial-ground, within the beautiful demesne of the Rochfort family.(some inscriptions on the tombs are given in Ryan\’s \”History and Antiquities of the Co. of Carlow, chap xxxi., pp. 334,335). The ornamental grounds skirt the public road from Carlow to Leighlin Bridge, and they extend along the western banks of the River Barrow. They are also on the slope of the Cloghrennan Hills. The former old church of this parish was in a good state of preservation in the summer of 1839; and at that time the measured length of the structure inside was 59 ft. 6 in., and its breadth was 18 ft. On the east gable was to be seen a large window, topped with a pointed arch. On the inside it began within two feet from the ground, and was 5 ft. broad in the lower part. On the outside it commenced within 4 ft. from the ground, and was 4 ft. broad in the lower part, rising to a height of no less than 12 ft. Near the west gable and in the south side wall there was a door having a pointed arch. There was another door opposite to it in the side wall, the opening running to the top of the wall, the upper part of which had been destroyed. The church was built of chiselled granite.

Here, also, on the banks of the River Barrow is to be seen Clogrennan Castle, now in ruins and covered with ivy. This formerly belonged to the Ormond family; Sit Edward Butler had raised the standard of revolt against the English Government in the sixteenth century. He held this castle, but it was taken from him by Sir Peter Carew in 1568. In 1641, it was besieged by the Irish. It was relieved, however, by Colonel Sir P. Wemys. At this place, the Marquis of Ormond mustered his forces, before proceeding to Dublin in 1649, when the battle of Rathmines took place. It is said, that after his defeat at the battle of the Boyne, James II. encamped at a place known as Bawn Ree ; however, for this statement, there seems to be no confirmation.

There is a grave-yard in the townland of Cloghrea in this parish, and it is only a short distance eastwards from the River Barrow. No vestiges of a church are within it. The Protestant church here was built in 1800, through a gift of £461 10S. 9 1/2 d. from the Board of First Fruits.

Some thirty years later, the Ecclesiastical Commissioners added a grant of £167 5s. 11d. for repairs. The glebe-house was built, in 1813, by a gift of £400, and a loan of £360, from the Board of First Fruits. The glebe comprised six acres, subject to a rent of £4 4s. an acre. The hamlet of Milford on the River Barrow is within this parish, and celebrated for its extensive flour-mills, which in the beginning of the last century carried on a flourishing trade by means of canal-boat communication with Dublin. At another spot, Killeeshal Fort on the west side and near the arrow is a remarkable circular enclosure.

In 1831, the population of this whole parish was 1422; the number in Carlow barony being 204, and in West Idrone barony being 903. Consequently the remaining 315 lived in the barony of Slievemargy. In 1834, the Roman Catholic population was 1,168 for this whole parish, while the Protestants numbered 343. In 1837, the estimated area of this parish was 4737 statute acres, of which 290 were woodland and 324 moorland, the remainder being arable and pasture; while 3764 acres were applotted under the Tithe Act, and they were valued at £3774 per annum. In 1841, the population of this whole parish was 1499. living in 240 houses. The population was thus distributed, viz. :-

That of Carlow barony section was 211, in 27 houses; that of Idrone West section 997, living in 161 houses, while that in Slievemargy barony was 291, living in 52 houses. In 1846 the rectorial tithes were compounded for £184 12s. 3 3/4 d., being impropriate in Colonel Henry Bruen and W. Fishbourne, Esq. The vicarial tithe composition was £92 6s. 1 3/4 d., with a glebe valued at £25 4s. ; the gross income being £117 10s. 1 3/4 d and the nett being £77 17s: 8 3/4 d. At present the incumbent has an annual stipend of £250. A Catholic chapel is in this parish, belonging to the Union of Old Leighlin, Wells, Clonmulsk, and Cillinane; and the religious history of the Union is traced under the heading of the Parish of Leighlin, by the Most Rev. Dr. Comerford.

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