Category Archives: Sligo

Emigration and Education Statistics, 1931, Co. Sligo

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Description from Thom’s Directory of Ireland, 1931.

BOUNDARIES AND DIMENSIONS

Sligo, a maritime county in the province of Connaught. It is bounded on the north by the Atlantic Ocean, on the east by county Leitrim, on the south by counties Roscommon and Mayo and on the west by county Mayo. Its length from the River Moy to the Arigna River is 40 ¾ miles and its breadth from Lough Gara to Donegal Bay is 38 ½ miles.

NAME AND FORMER DIVISIONS

The name of the county is derived from that of the town, being a shortened form of the Irish word Sligeach, which means river of sligs or shells. This river is now called the Garrogue. The part of the territory of Hy Fiachrach of the Moy, which extended to this county is represented by the barony of Tireragh. The other baronies represent ancient territories : Carbury; Leiny, the ancient Luighne; Tirerrill, the ancient Tir-Oililla; Corran; and Coolavin, the territory of the Mac Dermott; east of Lough Arrow is the northern Moytura or Moy-tura of the Fomorians, where a decisive battle was fought between the Dedannas and the Fomorians, the latter being vanquished.

PHYSICAL FEATURES

Minerals: The eastern portion of the county near Lough Allen belongs to the Connaught coalfield, and there is also a district near Arigna where iron ore is found. In the Ox Mountains, lead and copper mines were formerly worked.

The Ox Mountains lie south-west of Ballysodare and run west-south-west to the confines of Mayo, and are continued by the Slieve Gamph Range. The chief summits of the Ox Mountains are from 1,200 to 1,800 feet high and Slieve Gamph is 1,363’ in height. The north-east of the county is the most mountainous. Truskmore (2,113’), between Sligo and Leitrim is the highest peak; Benbulbin (1,792’) is very precipitous on the side facing Sligo Bay; King’s Mountain (1,527’); Knockarea (1,078’), an isolated flat-topped hill stands about 4 miles west of the town of Sligo; Slish (967’) and Slievedaene (900’) rise on the south shore of Lough Gill; the Bralieve range (1,498) are on the east of the barony of Tirerrill; the Curlieu Hills are on the boundary of Roscommon near Ballinafad, the highest peak being Keishcorran (1,183’) and Carrowkee (1,062’) on the shore of Lough Arrow.

The Headlands are Lenadoon Point, at the entrance to Killala Bay; Aughris Point running into Sligo Bay; Killaspug Point is at the north-east of Balysodare Bay; Roskeeragh Point, separating Donegal Bay and Sligo Bay; and in the north of the county is another Roskeeragh Point near which is Mullaghmore.

The islands are few in number, the chief being Maguire’s Island off Killaspug Point; Coney Island at the entrance to Cumeen Strand, to the north of which is Oyster Island with a lighthouse; near Coney Island is Black Rock with a lighthouse. Seal Rocks lie near Roskeeragh Point; Conor’s Island and Dernish Island lie off the coast at Cliffony; Inishmurray, in Donegal Bay is a mile in length and contains the ruins of the ancient monastery of St. Laserian or Molaise.

The Bays and Harbours are Killala Bay, separating county Sligo from county Mayo. It branches into three inlets. Ballysodare Bay, a branch which runs up to the town of Sligo, and Drumcliffe Bay form part of Sligo Bay.

The chief Rivers are the Moy, which rises in the Ox Mountains, flows first south-east and then south-west and entering county Mayo it then turns northwards and touches county Sligo again about 2 ½ miles above Ballina, from which point to its mouth it forms the boundary between counties Sligo and Mayo. The chief tributaries of the river Moy in county Sligo are the Mad River and the Owenahar, the Lough Talt River, on the north bank and the Owengarve River and the Mullaghanoe River on the south bank. The Leafonny River flows into Killala Bay. The Easky River rises in Lough Easkey in the Ox Mountains and falls into the sea near Easky. The Ballysodare River flows into Ballysodare Bay, its chief tributaries are the Owenmore, the Owenboy and the Unshin or Arrow River. The Feorish flows through the south-east of the county into Roscommon. The Bonet river which for a mile marks the boundary between Sligo and Leitrim. The Sligo or Garrogue River issues from Lough Gill and falls into Sligo Bay. The Drumcliff River flows west into Drumcliff Bay. The Duff River forms part of the boundary between Leitrim and Sligo, and flows into Donegal Bay.

The principal Lakes are Lough Arrow, Lough Gara and Lough Gill in the south-east of the county. Lough Gill is considered one of the most beautiful lakes in Ireland. Other lakes are Glencar Lake, CLoonty Lake and Skean Lake all on the boundary. In the centre of the county are Lough Easky, Lough Talt, Templehouse Lake, Cloonacleigha Lake, Toberscanavan Lake and Ballydawley Lake.

ANALYSIS OF THE CENSUS FOR COUNTY, 1821-1926

Year Males Females Total Pop.
1821 72,428 73,801 146,229
1831 83,730 88,035 171,765
1841 89,563 91,323 188,886
1851 62,881 65,634 128,515
1861 61,939 62,906 124,845
1871 56,984 58,509 115,493
1881 55,144 56,434 111,578
1891 48,670 49,343 98,013
1901 41,849 42,234 84,083
1911 40,060 38,985 79,045
1926 36,648 34,745 71,388

Families and Houses in 1926

The number of families in the county was 15,658, the average number in each family being 4.3. The number of inhabited houses was 15,644 showing an average of 4.6 persons to each house. The special inmates of public institutions are omitted from these calculations.

There were in the county 13,244 Occupiers or Heads of Families who were in occupation of less than five rooms, being 84.5% of the total for the county; of these, 711, or 4.5% of the families in the county occupied one room; 2,744, or 17.5% , 2 rooms; 7,414 or 47.3%, 3 rooms; and 2,735 or 15.2%, occupied 4 rooms.

There were in the county 264 tenements in which the room had only one occupant; 331 cases where the room had 2-4 occupants; 100 cases in which there were 5-7 occupants and 16 cases where the occupants of one room exceeded 7 in number, including 1 cases where 10 persons and 1 case where 11 persons and 1 case where 12 persons occupied the same room.

Birthplace of Inhabitants

Of the population in 1926, 88.61% were born in the county, 9.01 % in other counties in Saorstat Eireann. 0.77% in Northern Ireland, 1.22% in Great Britain, and 0.29% were born abroad.

Education

In 1911 there were in the county 65,164 persons aged 9 years and upwards; of these 55,333 or 84.9% could read and write; 2,909 or 3.4% could read only; and 7,622 or 11.7% were illiterate. As this is the first census where the age was raised from 5 to 9 it is not possible to compare figures for earlier censuses. However, the report states that the percentage of those of 5 years and upwards who were unable to read and write was 22.4% in 1891, 16% in 1901 and had fallen to 13.8% in 1901.

IRISH SPEAKING (1861-1911)

No.
of people
1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911

Irish only
3,466 2,326 472 147 77 24

Irish & English
36,263 24,263 31,458 21,189 17,493 15,903

Irish Total
39,729 26,589 31,930 21,336 17,570 15,927
% of
population
31.8 23.0 28.6 21.7 20.9 20.1

RELIGIONS, 1871-1926 (% of population)


Religion
1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1926

Roman Catholic
90.4 90.9 90.8 90.56 91.24 92.89

Church of Ireland
8.0 7.4 7.5 7.63 6.96 5.94

Presbyterians
0.7 0.8 0.7 0.79 0.86 0.43

Methodists
0.6 0.6 0.6 0.61 0.58 0.44

Others
0.3 0.3 0.4 0.41 0.36 0.30

EMIGRATION (1861-1911)

1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911
13,328 12,049 11,708 23,594 14,065 9,157
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1659 Census, Co. Sligo

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The following has been transcribed from ‘A Census of Ireland, c. 1659, with Supplementary Material from the Poll Money Ordinances (1660-1661)’ edited by Séamus Pender, and published by the Stationery Office, Dublin in 1939. Parishes and placenames as found in the 1851 ‘General Alphabetical Index to the Townlands and Towns, Parishes and Baronies of Ireland’ , originally published in Dublin in 1861, and re-printed by the Genealogical Publishing Company Inc., 1997, have been added in brackets beside the placenames as spelled in ‘A Census of Ireland – when identifiable.

According to Pender, W. H. Hardinge, M.R.I.A., announced his discovery of what has since been known as the Census of Ireland, (1659), in a paper read before the Royal Irish Academy in 1864.

The term ‘Titulado’, which appears through these returns, refers to the principal person or persons of standing in any locality ; such a person could have been of either sex, a nobleman, baronet, gentleman, esquire, military officer, or adventurer. A Titulado may have been a land-owner, but did not necessarily own land.

This census, does not give the names of individuals in any townland – other than those of the titullado or titulladoes. For each parish, we are given the surnames of the Irish people who lived in that parish, and the number of times that each surname occurs. We are given the total number of people who lived in any townland, and how many of them were Irish or English. The placename spellings for the most part differ to those of 1851, and in some cases, it may be that the barony boundaries changed post 1659, so that while a townland is found listed in the Townlands directory of 1851, the barony that it is listed under differs from that of 1659. The same seems to occur at the parish level.

Carbury Barony – Leyny Barony – Corran Barony – Coolavin Barony – Tireragh Barony – Tirerril Barony

Barony of Carbry (Carbury)

Article

Principall Irish Names and their Number:
Bryan – 7 ; O’Conor, 17 ; Canughan, 5 ; McDonogh, 6 ; Finy, 11 ; Gillgam, 6 ; Gillin & Gillan, 9 ; McGuan, 11 ; McGwyre, 4 ; Gillagher, 8 ; McGara, 4 ; Gillconnell, 6 ; O’Hart, 34 ; O Higgin, 5 ; Kelly, 10 ; Martin, 7.

Barony : Carbry ; English – 211 ; Irish – 1187
Totall – 1394

Sligoe Towne (Sligo)
No. of People : 488
English : 130 ; Irish : 358
Tituladoes Names : Humphrey Booth, gent ; Rowland Thomas, gent. ; Henry Crafford, gent

Aghamlish (Ahamlish) Parish

Ballyscannell (Ballyscannel)
No. of People : 8
English : 2 ; Irish : 6

Lislarry (Lislary)
No. of People : 3
English : 0 ; Irish : 3

Shrehidagh (Streedagh?)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Grange
No. of People : 27
English : 2 ; Irish : 25
Tituladoes Names: Thomas Soden, gent

Monidaullt (Moneygold?)
No. of People : 2
English : 0 ; Irish : 2

Carne (Cartron?)
No. of People : 7
English : 2 ; Irish : 5

Cliffney
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Cryickeele (Creevykeel?)
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Creenimore (Creevymore?)
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Mullagmore
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Bunduff
No. of People : 24
English : 0 ; Irish : 24

Mardneglasse
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Killsard
No. of People : 21
English : 0 ; Irish : 21

Derlihan (Derrylehan)
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Cloonergo (Cloonerco)
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Drinnfada (Drumfad)
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Inismores
No. of People : 3
English : 0 ; Irish : 3
Tituladoes Names: Phillipp Sulevane, gent

Drumclyffe or Drumcliffe parish (Drumcliff)

Dunawna (Doonowney)
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Ballyconnell
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Ballyknocke
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Dunfuard (Doonfore?)
No. of People : 10
English : 4 ; Irish : 6

Ballynagallagh (Ballynagalliagh)
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

The Rosses
No. of People : 28
English : 2 ; Irish : 26

Ballytemple (Ballintemple)
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Ardtermon & Ballymolury
No. of People : 23
English : 0 ; Irish : 23

Cloandelrar
No. of People : 31
English : 6 ; Irish : 25
Tituladoes Names: Charles Collis, Esq.

Coille Ruala
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Rahaberny (Rahaberna)
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Dunally
No. of People : 20
English : 0 ; Irish : 20

Gortnagrelly
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Glann (Glen)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Cloonin
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Court & Tinid
No. of People : 17
English : 2 ; Irish : 15
Tituladoes Names: Roger Parke, gent

Drumcliffe (Drumcliff)
No. of People : 17
English : 4 ; Irish : 13

Ballygillgan (Ballygilgan)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Culadruman (Cooldrumman)
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Castle Gayan (Castlegowan)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Monananen
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Lisananorus
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Aghagan
No. of People : 3
English : 0 ; Irish : 3

Bradecolline
No. of People : 55
English : 4 ; Irish : 51

Ballencarthy
No. of People : 24
English : 2 ; Irish : 22
Tituladoes Names: Thomas Gryffith, gent

Kantogher
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Mayhergillernew (Maheragillerneeve)
No. of People : 6
English : 2 ; Irish : 4

Cargin
No. of People : 20
English : 2 ; Irish : 18
Tituladoes Names: Anthony Ormsby, gent

Ballintennan
No. of People : 11
English : 2 ; Irish : 9

Lismarkie
No. of People : 16
English : 6 ; Irish : 10

Calgagh
No. of People : 12
English : 2 ; Irish : 10

Faghta qr.
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Shanoon oghter
No. of People : 5
English : 2 ; Irish : 3

Shanoon Iegher
No. of People : 6
English : 2 ; Irish : 4
Tituladoes Names: Thomas Osborne, gent

Maghercarncass
No. of People : 16
English : 7 ; Irish : 9

Anagh
No. of People : 214
English : 26 ; Irish : 188
Tituladoes Names: William Tod, gent. ; Henry Nicholson, gent. ; Thomas Ormsby, gent. ; Manus Lenaghan, gent.

Barony of Leynie (Leyny)

Principall Irish names and their number:
O Brenane, 17 ; Brenagh, 8 ; Bourke, 6 ; Conellan, 6 ; Corkan, 6 ; Conelly, 6, McDonell, 5 ; O Duhy, 5 ; McDonagh, 4 ; Dogherty, 7 ; McEuchae, 8 ; O Finegane, 5 ; O Fahy & Farihy, 6 ; McGwyre, 6 ; Gallaghur, 40 ; Hara & O Hara, 15 ; O Higgin, 11 ; McHenry, 5 ; Kelly, 8 ; McLenany, 9 ; O Mullinihilly, 7 ; McManus, 6 ; McMurey, 5 ; Mullarky, 5 ; Roney & Reyney, 8 ; McSwyne, 7 ; McStayne, 8 ; McTeire, 5.

Barony : Leynie ; English 76 ; Irish 1105.
Totall : 1181

Aghonry parish (Achonry)

Belary (Bellahy?)
No. of People : 62
English : 6 ; Irish : 56

Moineagh (Montiagh?)
No. of People : 16
English : 4 ; Irish : 12
Tituladoes Names: Capt. Edmond Wood, gent

Coillcaver (Coolrawer?)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Cloonleaucoill (Cloonlaughil)
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Curryunnane (Curraghbonaun?)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Rahmagorra (Rathmagurry)
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Rahscanlane
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Ballencurry (Ballincurry)
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Corry & Garryvaine
No. of People : 26
English : 0 ; Irish : 26

Cashall
No. of People : 35
English : 0 ; Irish : 35

Dougharne
No. of People : 37
English : 0 ; Irish : 37

Maclagha
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Magheranoir(Magheranore)
No. of People : 17
English : 2 ; Irish : 15
Tituladoes Names: Edward Pole, gent

Ougham (Oghambaun?)
No. of People : 19
English : 3 ; Irish : 16

Aghonry
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Muckalta (Muckelty)
No. of People : 28
English : 0 ; Irish : 28

Carowcarragh (Carrowcarragh)
No. of People : 25
English : 0 ; Irish : 25

Tully Hugh (Tullyhugh)
No. of People : 18
English : 4 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: Thomas Rosevill, gent

Congall
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish :14

Coorte Abbey
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Cashall
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Carowendin
No. of People : 10
English : 1 ; Irish : 9

Cloonderar (Cloondrihara?)
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Carowna Crivy
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 26

Carowcoillue
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Cloonbanue (Cloonbaniff?)
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Leatrim
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Dromore (Doomore?)
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Carowreagh
No. of People : 26
English : 0 ; Irish : 26

Molane
No. of People : 28
English : 0 ; Irish : 28

Talyvelly (Tawnavoultry?)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Sessucomane (Sessucommon)
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Sessugarry (Sessuegarry)
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Sessumas
No. of People : 62
English : 4 ; Irish : 58

Kill McTeige parish (Kilmacteige)

Bennana
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Colrecoile
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Binagh
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Tullanaglogg
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Gorterslin (Gortersluin)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Knockbreak (Knockbrack)
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Cladagh (Claddagh)
No. of People : 20
English : 0 ; Irish : 20

Kill McTeige (Kilmacteige)
No. of People : 32
English : 0 ; Irish : 32

Tullamoy (Tullymoy)
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Kincolly (Kilcuillew?)
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Glenvee (Glennawoo?)
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Carowreagh
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Clongunagh
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Castle-caragh
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Drimine (Drimina)
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Rooes
No. of People : 21
English : 6 ; Irish : 15

Kilvarnett parish (Kilvarnet)

Templehouse
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Carrowantawa (Carrowntawy)
No. of People : 8
English : 4 ; Irish : 4

Munuossane
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Plaragh
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Munuossane (listed twice in same parish with different sets of figures)
No. of People : 9
English : 2 ; Irish : 7

Anaghmore (Annagh More)
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Edernin
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Finlogh (Finlough)
No. of People : 4
English : 2 ; Irish : 2

Anaghbeg (annagh Beg)
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Adoreeoghtir
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Kilvarnett
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Ragraine (Rathgran)
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Ballyassadore Half Parish

Kellylyny
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Kearownagiragh
No. of People : 19
English : 11 ; Irish : 8

Coanuy
No. of People : 8
English : 4 ; Irish : 4

Aby Towne (Abbeytown)
No. of People : 16
English : 4 ; Irish : 12

Cortawnagh (Corhawnagh)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Killnamanagh (Kilnamanagh)
No. of People : 23
English : 7 ; Irish : 16

Killinbridge
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Killinbridge (listed twice, with different figures)
No. of People : 5
English : 0 ; Irish : 5

Billy (Billa)
No. of People : 16
English : 2 ; Irish : 14

Lognamakin (Lugnamackan)
No. of People : 23
English : 3 ; Irish : 20

Ballyasodare (Ballysadare)
No. of People : 13
English : 3 ; Irish : 10

Dromdirig
No. of People : 9
English : 4 ; Irish : 5

Barony of Correnn (Corran)

Principall Irish Names & their Number:
Brenane, 12 ; O Cunane, 5 ; Conellan, 5 ; Connor, 5 ; McDonogh, 30 ; O DAcy, 5, McDier, 5 ; O Fluen, 10 ; Gillelorin, 7 ; McGilltrich, 8 ; O Gara, 6 ; O Heiver, 5 ; O Horchoy, 9 ; O Healy, 13 ; O Kerin, 6 ; Mullronifin, 16 ; McSwyne, 6 ; O’Scanlane, 19 ; Trumble, 8 ; Tanist, 6.

Barony Corren : English – 76 ; Irish 1031
Totall 1107.

Imlaghfada Parish (Emlaghfad)

Lishananymore (Lisananny More)
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Cloonagun
No. of People : 6
English : 4 ; Irish : 2

Emlafadd (Emlaghfad)
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Corhubber (Corhober)
No. of People : 9
English : 3 ; Irish : 6

Cargagh
No. of People : 40
English : 6 ; Irish : 34

Ballymote
No. of People : 112
English : 14 ; Irish : 98
Tituladoes Names: William Webb, gent

Dorin (Derroon?)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Ardnaglasse
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Cloonamanagh
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Clonyne
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Carownacloode
No. of People : 24
English : 0 ; Irish : 24

Rathdowney (Rathdoony)
No. of People : 28
English : 5 ; Irish : 23
Tituladoes Names: Francis King, Esq.

Bally-Brenan (Ballybrennan)
No. of People : 24
English : 0 ; Irish : 24

Ardconnell
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Portinohy (Portinch?)
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Emla Naghtin (Emlaghnaghtan)
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Kilturrrow Parish (Killturra)

Ballyfay (Ballyfahy)
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Knockaylor
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Rabane (Rathbaun)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Killturrow (Kilturra)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Ogham
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Ballindow
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Clooneoghill Parish (Cloonoghill)

Bunanadan
No. of People : 30
English : 4 ; Irish : 26
Tituladoes Names: Timothy Howes, gent

Ballinvally
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Collere
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Clooneoghill
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Climemeahan (Cloonameehan?)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Climemeahan (listed twice, 2 sets of figures)
No. of People : 6
English : 4 ; Irish : 2

Ballinglogh (Ballynaglogh)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Carewreagh (Carrowreagh)
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Knockanurhar
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Lislea
No. of People : 2
English : 0 ; Irish : 2

Killoshallny Parish (Kilshalvy)

Balenspur
No. of People : 13
English : 6 ; Irish : 7

Ballylonaghan (Ballonaghan)
No. of People : 13
English : 6 ; Irish : 7
Tituladoes Names: Richard Meredith, gent

Ballintrohan (Ballintrofaun?)
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Runelaghta
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Killow-Shalway (Kilshalvy)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Clune Cuny
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Clunagh
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Cloonebunagh
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Clunene (Cloonena)
No. of People : 5
English : 0 ; Irish : 5

Thawnaghmore (Tawnaghmore)
No. of People : 3
English : 0 ; Irish : 3

Collnehary
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Drumratt Parish

No townland named – possibly Drumratt townland
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Rathmolin
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Knockgrane (Knockgrania)
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Ardlaherty
No. of People : 3
English : 0 ; Irish : 3

Cloonenacladry (Cloonacaltry)
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Liscoway (Lisconry?)
No. of People : 11
English : 3 ; Irish : 8

Clunesanbaly (Clooneshanbally)
No. of People : 20
English : 0 ; Irish : 20

Knockbrack
No. of People : 20
English : 0 ; Irish : 20

Killmurran Parish (Kilmorgan)

Kinchium
No. of People : 20
English : 6 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: John Duke, gent ; John Geale, gent.

Cnochmonagh
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13
Tituladoes Names: Donell Conellane, gent

Cloonelargo
No. of People : 8
English : 2 ; Irish : 6
Tituladoes Names: John Clifford, gent

Durly
No. of People : 16
English : 2 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: Edward Tibb, gent

Drumfin
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Ardrea
No. of People : 4
English : 2 ; Irish : 2
Tituladoes Names: Henry Bierast, gent

Lacahaky
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Thomune
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Killmurin
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Clunenegallell
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: Robert Duke, gent

Dunemigin
No. of People : 16
English : 2 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: John Houlder, gent

Tumour Parish (Toomour)

Levally
No. of People : 24
English : 0 ; Irish : 24

Ballinscaruagh (Bellanascarrow)
No. of People : 13
English : 2 ; Irish : 11

Drumnegrangy (Drumnagranshy)
No. of People : 40
English : 0 ; Irish : 40

Thumore (Toomour)
No. of People : 8
English : 2 ; Irish : 6

Roseribb (Roscrib)
No. of People : 38
English : 2 ; Irish : 36

Cnockloch
No. of People : 6
English : 1 ; Irish : 5
Tituladoes Names: Robert King, gent

Templevany (Templevanny)
No. of People : 68
English : 0 ; Irish : 68

Carowreagh(Carrowreagh)
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Dloonecahu
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Lorga (Lurgan?)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Thrinemore
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Morhy (Murhy)
No. of People : 21
English : 0 ; Irish : 21

Half Barony of Culavin (Coolavin)

Principall Irish Names & their Number in this halfe Barony and that of Tireragh
Albonagh, 5 ; Bourke, 15 ; Beolan, 14 ; O Connor, 7 ; Cassey, 8 ; Conellan, 13 ; Clery, 6 ; Dowde, 17 ; Dowda, 7 ; McDonogh, 9 ; McDermott, 5 ; Dunegan, 6 ; McDonnell &c., 14 ; Flanagan, 9 ; Ferbishy, 10 ; McGillaghlen, 6 ; Geraghty, 6 ; O’Gara &c., 14 ; Helly, 6 ; Hanraghan, 6 ; O’Hara, 6 ; O Hart, 9 ; Kelly, 15 ; Loghlin, 6 ; McMurey, 6 ; Mollany, 6

Barony : Tyreragh ; English : 86 Irish, 1409
Totall : 1495

Killaragh Parish (Killaraght)

Rossmoyle
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Lesgalan (Lisgullaun)
No. of People : 31
English : 0 ; Irish : 31

Sexifind
No. of People : 71
English : 0 ; Irish : 71

Killfry parish (Kilfree)

Killfry (Kilfree)
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Ratharmon
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Carrownorclare
No. of People : 5
English : 0 ; Irish : 5

Ardsorine
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Killaragh
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9
Tituladoes Names: Henry Tifford, gent

Clogher
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Fawnymuckelagh
No. of People : 23
English : 0 ; Irish : 23

Moygara
No. of People : 38
English : 0 ; Irish : 38

Mullaghroe
No. of People : 34
English : 0 ; Irish : 34

Tireragh Barony

Principall Irish Names & their Number in this Barony and the halfe Barony of Coolavin
Albonagh, 5 ; Bourke, 15 ; Beolan, 14 ; O Connor, 7 ; Cassey, 8 ; Conellan, 13 ; Clery, 6 ; Dowde, 17 ; Dowda, 7 ; McDonogh, 9 ; McDermott, 5 ; Dunegan, 6 ; McDonnell &c., 14 ; Flanagan, 9 ; Ferbishy, 10 ; McGillaghlen, 6 ; Geraghty, 6 ; O’Gara &c., 14 ; Helly, 6 ; Hanraghan, 6 ; O’Hara, 6 ; O Hart, 9 ; Kelly, 15 ; Loghlin, 6 ; McMurey, 6 ; Mollany, 6

Barony : Tyreragh ; English : 86 Irish, 1409
Totall : 1495

Castleconnor Parish
Castleconnor & Newtowne
No. of People : 76
English : 10 ; Irish : 66
Tituladoes Names: John Nicholson, gent

Killanly
No. of People : 23
English : 3 ; Irish : 20

Carne
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Scormore
No. of People : 37
English : 2 ; Irish : 25
Tituladoes Names: Lewis Wingfield, gent

Carrownorlaire
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Carrowcardin
No. of People : 23
English : 0 ; Irish : 23

Ballevoheny
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Ballyfinane (Ballyfeenaun)
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Ballymonine (Ballymoneen)
No. of People : 23
English : 0 ; Irish : 23

Cottells towne
No. of People : 57
English : 8 ; Irish : 49

Arnery
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Browhy
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Qugumanger
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Qugunaleike
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

South Cromley
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

North Cromley
No. of People : 15
English : 2 ; Irish : 13

Qugunasher
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Templeboy Parish

Graingebegg (Grange Beg)
No. of People : 29
English : 0 ; Irish : 29

Ballyarish (Ballyfaris?)
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Gariduff (Garyduff)
No. of People : 38
English : 2 ; Irish : 36
Tituladoes Names: Christopher Armstrong, gent

Corraghmore (Corkagh More)
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Graingemore
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: Nicholas Rutledge, gent

Doneghentrae
No. of People : 13
English : 4 ; Irish : 9

Donecholy (Dooncoy?)
No. of People : 56
English : 13 ; Irish : 43

Aghres
No. of People : 12
English : 5 ; Irish : 7

Templeboy Dunanalt
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Dromard Parish

Longford
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19
Tituladoes Names: Henry Craston, gent

Drumard (Dromard)
No. of People : 28
English : 0 ; Irish : 28

Clonagh (Cloonagh)
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Carow McCarrick
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Tonregoe (Tanrego)
No. of People : 34
English : 4 ; Irish : 30
Tituladoes Names: John Irving, gent

Lagbane
No. of People : 24
English : 0 ; Irish : 24
Tituladoes Names: Edward Erving

Bunany
No. of People : 42
English : 2 ; Irish : 40

Mularee
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Faren Iharpy (Farranyharpy)
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Dunflyn
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Larragh
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Skreem Parish (Skreen)
Ardneglass (Ardnaglass)
No. of People : 60
English : 7 ; Irish : 53
Tituladoes Names: Lewis Jones, Esq. ; Jeremy Jones, gent

Carowcashell
No. of People : 35
English : 0 ; Irish : 35

Carowen loghane
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Carowentihane
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Carowne-Caldny
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Carow Ioteryne
No. of People : 4
English : 2 ; Irish : 2

Drumnegole (Drumnagoal)
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Skreene
No. of People : 25
English : 0 ; Irish : 25

Killglass Parish
Eskerowne
No. of People : 31
English : 0 ; Irish : 31

Leackantleavy
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Cloonederavally
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Leackan McHerbisi
No. of People : 26
English : 7 ; Irish : 19
Tituladoes Names: Thomas Wood, gent

Polikmy
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8
Tituladoes Names: John Moore, gent

Cabbragh
No. of People : 11
English : 2 ; Irish : 9

Leffony
No. of People : 16
English : 5 ; Irish : 11

Leah Vale, Nedyne & Killglass
No. of People : 25
English : 0 ; Irish : 25

Carewcaller
No. of People : 21
English : 0 ; Irish : 21

Coyllin
No. of People : 25
English : 0 ; Irish : 25

Kill McSalgan Parish (Kilmacshalgan)

Duneile
No. of People : 38
English : 0 ; Irish : 38
Tituladoes Names: John Burke, gent

Dowmeyckine
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18
Tituladoes Names: Robert Hylla, gent

Dunowla
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Carowruish
No. of People : 29
English : 2 ; Irish : 27
Tituladoes Names: William Edwards, gent

Carow mabline & Balle McGillchrisi
No. of People : 19
English : 3 ; Irish : 16
Tituladoes Names: John Irwin, gent

Leah Carow
No. of People : 25
English : 0 ; Irish : 25

Kean Conally
No. of People : 31
English : 0 ; Irish : 31

Eskagh Parish (Esky)

Rachly (Rathly?)
No. of People : 43
English : 0 ; Irish : 43
Tituladoes Names: William Ormsby, gent

Fynidy
No. of People : 3
English : 1 ; Irish : 2
Tituladoes Names: William Boswell, gent

Lissaghan
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Rosly
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17
Tituladoes Names: James Ormsby, gent

Killyn
No. of People : 21
English : 0 ; Irish : 21
Tituladoes Names: George Ormsby, gent

Coogylaghlin
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Castletowne (Castletown)
No. of People : 31
English : 0 ; Irish : 31

Ballyvony
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Barony of Tirerill or Tireill or Tyrerell

Principall Irish Names and their Number
McAwly, 10 ; McBrehuny, 15 ; O Benaghan, 7 ; Conillan, 18 ; Connor, 6 ; McDermott, 8 ; McDermott roe, 10 ; McDonogh, 37 ; Ferall, 8 ; O Feeny, 6 ; Flyn, 10 ; Gauna, 9 ; Guan & Gowen, 9 ; O Higgin &c., 13 ; O Hely, 14 ; O Hart, 10 ; Kelly, 11 ; O Keoyne &c., 9 ; O Kerin, 5 ; McLoghlin, 15 ; McMulronifin, 5 ; O Molleany, 12 ; McMorey, 14 ; Milegan, 5 ; O Scanlane, 5 ; McTeige, 5

The Number of People in the Barony of Tyrerell : English, 89 : Irish, 1300
Totall : 1389

Achanagh Parish (Aghanagh)

Belanafad (Ballinafad)
No. of People : 32
English : 9 ; Irish : 23
Tituladoes Names: Henry Hughs, gent

Souldiers & their wifes in Balanafad
No. : 24
English : 11 ; Irish : 13

Bally mullany
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Mullaghfearna
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Carricknehorna
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Ballyhely (Ballyhealy)
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Drumdony (Drumdoney)
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Carow Keel (Carrowkeel)
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Clahog (Clohoge)
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Drumcolan parish (Drumcolumb)

Brickliew
No. of People : 45
English : 9 ; Irish : 36
Tituladoes Names: Edward Nicholson, gent

Coolskeagh
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Drumcolam & Killmacolane Parish (?Drumcolumb)
Lisconay
No. of People : 18
English : 2 ; Irish : 16
Tituladoes Names: William Mortimor, gent

Drumcolum & Killmacollane Parish (?Drumcolumb)
Cnockanarva
No. of People :
English : 4 ; Irish : 0
Tituladoes Names: Ralph Carter, gent

Cloghfin
No. of People : 8
English : 2 ; Irish : 6
Tituladoes Names: John Fergusson, gent

Clooninclagh
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Ballyderaowne
No. of People : 18
English : 2 ; Irish : 6
Tituladoes Names: Charles Cartwright, gent

Carowsparanagh
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Achculback
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Cnockro
No. of People : 7
English : 2 ; Irish : 5
Tituladoes Names: Archy Naper, gent

Drumleaghin
No. of People : 9
English : 2 ; Irish : 5

Coilly
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Drumvicoill
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Anaghcarry
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Drumcolum
No. of People : 3
English : 0 ; Irish : 3

Ardvarnagh
No. of People : 16
English : 0 ; Irish : 16

Carowreagh
No. of People : 22
English : 0 ; Irish : 22

Ross
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Coiltelacha
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Drumshehin
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Anagh
No. of People : 4
English : 0 ; Irish : 4

Kill McCulan parish(?Kilmacallan)

Coillmore No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Coredeynce
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Cleavry
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Drumraine
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Lisbrislean
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Cloonine (Clooneen)
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Ballissadara parish
Cnockbegg
No. of People : 25
English : 5 ; Irish : 20

Killinbridge
No. of People : 39
English : 14 ; Irish : 25

Cooloony Castle
No. of People : 37
English : 10 ; Irish : 27
Tituladoes Names: Richard Coote, Esq.

Clooncorra
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Balleneboll
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Cnockmolin
No. of People : 19
English : 0 ; Irish : 19

Carrickbeanaghan
No. of People : 24
English : 0 ; Irish : 24
Tituladoes Names: Morgan Farrell, gent

Lissrunty
No. of People : 6
English : 2 ; Irish : 4
Tituladoes Names: John Perchy, gent

Cloonmahin
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Toburscanamnane
No. of People : 4
English : 2 ; Irish : 2

Marckrea
No. of People : 17
English : 3 ; Irish : 14
Tituladoes Names: Edward Cooper, gent

Ballysadora Parish
Rathgrany
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Ballissadar
No. of People : 23
English : 0 ; Irish : 23

Killmatrahny Parish (Kilmactranny)
Givagh
No. of People : 27
English : 0 ; Irish : 27
Tituladoes Names: Henry Ellis, gent

Sraduff
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Tulanure
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Balinashia
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Killkeire
No. of People : 21
English : 0 ; Irish : 21

Ballinlog
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Derinclare
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Ballenay
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Drumbeg
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Coolmurly
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Kill McTreany
No. of People : 14
English : 0 ; Irish : 14

Killamoy
No. of People : 28
English : 0 ; Irish : 28

Killwogoone Parish (?Kilmacowan)
Ballindoone
No. of People : 11
English : 0 ; Irish : 11

Anagh & Knockglass
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Killwogoone
No. of People : 12
English : 0 ; Irish : 12

Ballaghabo
No. of People : 17
English : 0 ; Irish : 17

Shancogh Parish (Shancough)
Carownaquillo
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Darghny
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Umarero (Ummeryoe)
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Carowmore (Carrowmore)
No. of People : 20
English : 0 ; Irish : 20

Shancogh
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Cabragh
No. of People : 9
English : 0 ; Irish : 9

Gorworck (Garoke)
No. of People : 7
English : 0 ; Irish : 7

Bally somoghan Parish (Ballysumaghan)
Gidlane
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Drumnye
No. of People : 15
English : 0 ; Irish : 15

Largan
No. of People : 13
English : 0 ; Irish : 13

Carownuinn
No. of People : 7
English : 4 ; Irish : 3

Knocknagey
No. of People : 18
English : 0 ; Irish : 18

Lehbully
No. of People : 10
English : 0 ; Irish : 10

Drumneigh
No. of People : 6
English : 0 ; Irish : 6

Lowally
No. of People : 8
English : 0 ; Irish : 8

Killrasse Parish (Kilross)
Castleloghdergan
No. of People : 104
English : 6 ; Irish : 98
Tituladoes Names: Thomas Croston, Esq.

Tobernany
No. of People : 200
English : 2 ; Irish : 198

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Presbyterian (Seceders) Synod, 1833: Congregation Index

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Presbyterian (Seceders) Synod, 1833: Name Index

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Roman Catholic Parishes, 1836: Parish Index

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This page features a list of over 1,300 record parishes from the Roman Catholic Parishes index of 1836.

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Official Authorities, 1834, Co. Sligo

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Article

Surname Name & title Address
Arbuthnot
Armstrong
Atkinson
Bingham
Bolland
Booth
Bromhead
Carter
Clendining
Corr
Crawford
Crofton
Crofton
Crossley
Dodwell
Duke
Faussett
Faussett
Fenton
Folliot
French
French
French
French
Fry
Gilmore
Gore
Gore
Grace
Grove
Hillas
Howley
Howley
Irwin
Irwin
Irwin
Jackson
Jackson
Jones
Jones
Jones
Jones
King
Kinston
Knox
Knox
Martin
Martin
Martin
M’Dermot
Neynoe
Neynoe
Nicholson
O’Connor
O’Hara
Ormsby
Paget
Parke
Perceval
Philips
Pugh
Seymour
Slade
Stack
Strickland
Trulock
Warburton
Weir
West
Wingfield
Wood
Wynne
Thomas Major-General, Sir, K.C.B.
John Esq.
Charles Esq.
Denis Esq.
Michael Rev.
Robert Gore Sir, Bart.
Edward Gonville Major
Samson Major (Police magistrate)
Alexander Esq
Dominick Esq
Ninian Brigadier-Major
James Sir, Bart.
Malby Esq
Arthur Esq., (Police Magistrate)
James Crofton Esq.
William Rev.
Henry Lieutenant
William Esq
John Esq.
John Esq
Arthur Esq
J. Very Rev., Dean of Elphin
John Rev.
Stephen Esq., M.P.
Henry Esq.
Gowan Esq
Francis Arthur Knox Esq.
William Ormsby Esq.
Oliver D.J Esq
Wm. Rev.
Thomas Esq.
Edward, jun. Esq.
Edward, sen. Esq
Henry Esq
John Colonel
Richard P. Esq.
George Lieut-Col.
George Vaughan Esq.
Daniel Esq.
Jeremy Esq.
JOhn Esq.
John Gore Esq.
Edward Henry, Major-General Esq.
Earl of – George Esq.
Annesley Esq.
John Frederick Esq
Abraham Esq.
Charles Esq.
John Esq., M.P.
Molloy Esq.
Edward Loftus Esq.
William Bridges Esq.
Edward Esq.
Don M.P.
Charles King Esq.
John Esq
Thomas Esq.
William Lieut-Col.
Alexander Esq., M.P.
Thomas Esq.
Arthur Esq
Joseph Rev.
Henry Hercules Esq.
John Rev.
Jerrard Edward Esq
George Rev.
George Major (Insp.r Gen.of Police)
William Esq
John Esq.
Edward, Honorable Esq.
James Esq
Owen Esq.
Not listed
Chaffpool, Ballymoate
Rahans, Ballina
Not listed
Dromahair
Lissadill, Sligo
Carnsfoot, Sligo
Not listed
Not listed
Co. Roscommon
Not listed
Longford House, Colooney
Not listed
Not listed
Mount-Dodwell, Ballymoate
Willowbrook, Sligo
Sligo
Willsborough, Sligo
Dromore House, Dromore West
Hollybrook, Boyle
French-park
Elphin
French Park
French Park
Frybrook, Sligo
Ballyglass, Sligo
Beleek, Ballina
Not listed
Mantua, Elphin
Charlesfort, Dromore West
Seaview House, Dromore West
Beleek, Ballina
Beleek-castle, Ballina
Not listed
Tanragoe, Sligo
Mountjoy-square, East, Dublin
Co. Mayo
Not listed
Banada, Ballymoate
Dromore House, Dromore West
Raughly, Sligo
Not listed
London
Mitchelstown, Co. Cork
Rappa-castle, Ballina
Mount-falcon
Sligo
Finiskin, Sligo
Sligo
Boyle
Castle-Neynoe, Colooney
Castle Neynoe, Collooney
Cregg-house, Sligo
Belanagare, Co. Roscommon
Annaghmore, Colooney
Castledargan, Collooney
Dromore West
Doonally, Sligo
Temple-house, Ballymote
Clenmore, Ballaghadereen
Killala
Not listed
Mount-Shannon, Sligo
Beltra Glebe, Collooney
Loughglynn-house
Collooney
Not listed
Lakeview, Boyle
Ballinaglough, Ballymoate
Ballina
Woodville, Sligo
Hazlewood, Sligo
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The Irish Ancestor

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Vol. 1, No. 1, 1969

Christian names in Ireland
de Breffny, Brian

Entries from the Randall Family Bible

Finucane of Co. Clare
Mott, George F.

Household Stuff
ffolliott, Rosemary

Administrations from the peculiar of Newry & Mourne

ffolliott of Co. Meath
ffolliott, Rosemary

Mallow Testamentary Records

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
Darwin, Kenneth

The Value of Tombstone Inscriptions
Clarke, R.S. J. Dr.

CONTENTS
Vol. 1, No. 2, 1969

An 18th Century Abduction. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………69

Entries from the Rev. Alexander Neilson’s Family Bible………………………76

Crone of Co. Cork. Brian de Breffny………………………………………………77

Wills of irish Interest at Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1749-1847
Terrence Punch………………………………………………………………………89

A Record of Presbyterians in Co. Antrim. Patrick Smythe-Wood…………….95

Some Irish Monumental Inscriptions in England.
Horace E. Jones……………………………………………………………………..97

The Journal of the Rev. Adam Averell. Mary Ross Brown…………………..103

Some irish Militia Movements during the Early Napoleonic Wars.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………109

The Family of Odell or O’Dell. Brian de Breffny………………………………114

Finucane of Co. Clare: Addenda and Corrigenda…………………………….144

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………145

CONTENTS
Vol. II, No. 1, 1970

An unknown Miniature of Mrs. Jordan.
Usher A. F. Williamson……………………………………………………………….1

Pons to Punch. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………….2

Children’s Clothes, 1679-1867. Rosemary ffolliott……………………………..19

Entries from the Family Bible of James Hyde of Longford…………………….23

The Oldest Registers of Ballingarry, Co. Limerick……………………………..24

The Dexters of Dublin and Annfield, Co. Kildare.
Patrick Montague-Smith…………………………………………………………….31

The Furnishings of an 18th Century Inn…………………………………………43

Irish Nominees in the State Tontines of 1773, 1775 and 1777.
Francis Leeson………………………………………………………………………47

Some Connecting Links between Ireland and the New World from Old
Newspapers. Rosemary ffoliott…………………………………………………..62

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………70

CONTENTS
Vol. II, No. 2, 1970

Ambrose O’Higgins: An enquiry into his Origins and Ancestry.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………….81

Vicars. The Hon. Guy Strutt………………………………………………………90

Spread of Co. Cork. Brian de Breffny………………………………………….102

“An Irishman’s House and his Church”
Elizabeth Fitzpatrick……………………………………………………………..112

Entries from the McDermott and Rees Family Bible…………………………114

The Estate of Archibald Hutchinson of the Middle Temple, Esq.
Patrick Smythe-Wood……………………………………………………………115

Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………..117

Entrance gates. Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………128

Inscriptions from the Parish Churchyard of Culfeightrin, Co. Antrim.
Patrick and Elizabeth Smythe-Wood………………………………………….131

Pons to Punch, Addenda and Corrigenda…………………………………….136

CONTENTS
Vol. III, No. 1, 1971

Peg Plunket, Lady of Pleasure. Francis Leeson………………………………….1

Some Irish Inscriptions in Old Burial Grounds of New South

Wales, Australia. Keith A. Johnson……………………………………………….5

The Breretons of Carrigslaney, Co. Carlow and New Abbey, Co. Kildare.
Patrick Montague-Smith……………………………………………………………10

Abstracts of Some Hamilton Wills………………………………………………..27

Blaney of Lurgan, Co. Armagh.
Roger Blaney…………………………………………………………………………33

A List of Catholic Merchants in Cork City in 1762………………………………39

The Family of Odell or O’Dell: Supplement.
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………..41

Some lesser Known Country Houses in Munster and Leinster.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………..49

Entries from the Bible of Mrs. Robert Gordon…………………………………..51

Quaker Inventories. Olive C. Goodbody………………………………………….52

Crone of Cork: Addenda and Corrigenda…………………………………………62

Spread of Cork: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………………………..63

Dexter of Annfield: Addenda and Corrigenda……………………………………63

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………….64

CONTENTS
Vol. III, No. 2, 1971

Robert Fagan, Artist. Brian de Breffny……………………………………………..71

Old Parochial Registers of Scotland: References to Parties from Ireland
Donald Whyte………………………………………………………………………….79

The International Genealogical Directory. Francis Leeson……………………..83

Entries from George Keane Johnston’s Family Bible…………………………….84

Women’s Dress in Ireland, 1680-1880. Rosemary ffolliott…………………….85

Brewster of Co. Kerry. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………..90

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………….92

The Charm of Irish Gate Cottages. Rosemary ffolliott………………………..102

Births, Marriages and Deaths from the Journal of the Rev. Adam Averall.
Mary Ross Brown…………………………………………………………………….105

Eight Emigrant Irishmen. Terrence M. Punch……………………………………107

The Earlies Church of Ireland Parish Registers of Whitechurch, Diocese of
Ferns…………………………………………………………………………………..121

The Irish Society for Archives. Brian de Breffny………………………………..123

The Breretons of Carrigslaney, Co. Carlow and New Abbey, Co. Kildare.
Addenda and Corrigenda……………………………………………………………124

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………125

CONTENTS
Vol. IV, No. 1, 1972

The American Sailor who Succeeded to an Irish Peerage.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………………1

Irishmen in Scottish Census Records. David C. Cargill……………………………8

Monckton of Co. Limerick. Brian de Breffny………………………………………..15

John Galvin’s Copybook……………………………………………………………….21

Tombstones of some irish Emigrants in the Catholic Cemetery at Andover.
Paul Martin Doherty……………………………………………………………………23

Hillas of Co. Sligo. Celeste Byrne……………………………………………………26

Cottages and Farmhouses. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………….30

Arthur Kingstone’s Household Stuff. N.W. English……………………………….35

The Debtors of Daniel Croghan, Ennis, Co. Clare, 1735…………………………43

Abstracts of Wills……………………………………………………………………..45

Reviews…………………………………………………………………………………52

CONTENTS
Vol, IV, No. 2, 1972

A Wexford Lady and her Daughters on the Continent.
Phillipa Torlonia di Civitella Cesi…………………………………………………..59

Entries from James Francis Plunkett’s Family Bible……………………………..70

Scanlan of the Barony of Upper Connello, Co. Limerick
Brian de Breffny & Alicia E. Evers………………………………………………….71

Shall these Bones Live? Rosemary ffoliott……………………………………….81

Australian Immigration, with Special Reference to the Irish Migrant.
Marjorie J. Morgan………………………………………………..83

A Note on John Skerry, a Kilkenny Emigrant to Canada
Terence Punch………………………………………………..86

Men’s Clothes in Ireland, 1660-1850.
Rosemary ffolliott………………………………………………..81

Speranza’s Ancestry – Elgee, the Maternal Lineage of Oscar Wilde
Brian de Breffny………………………………………………..94

William Collin’s Inventory, 1750………………………………………………..104

Monumental Inscriptions from Mount Temple Churchyard,
Co. Westmeath. Liam Cox………………………………………………..105

Eight Emigrant Irishmen: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………………………………..112

Reviews………………………………………………..113

CONTENTS
Vol. V, No. 1, 1973

The Descendants of Robert McCann of Cloghoge, Co. Armagh.
Guy Strutt……………………………………………………………………………..1

Eating and Drinking Habits in Ireland Two hundred Years Ago.
George Mott…………………………………………………………………………..7

Father bernard’s Register and the irish Militia in Essex.
Patrick Quinlivan……………………………………………………………………12

Some Country Houses near Athlone. N.W. English……………………………17

Notices of Irish-Born Persons in New York City Newspapers.
B. Ann Moorhouse………………………………………………………………….24

Entries from Sampson Cox’s Family Bible………………………………………27

Monumental Inscriptions at Whitechurch, Co. Waterford……………………28

Provincial Town Life in Munster. Rosemary ffolliot……………………………34

Early 19th century Lists of Protestant Parishoners in the
Diocese of Meath.Rev. C.C.Ellison……………………………………………….37

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………..53

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………63

CONTENTS
Vol. V., No. 2, 1973

The Vereker Family. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………69

Some Irish Inscriptions in an Old Burial Ground at Sydney,
New South Wales, Australia. Keith A. Johnson…………………………….76

Entries from the Lyons Family Prayerbook…………………………………..83

Heraldic or Ornamental Animal Figures in Ireland. Rosemary ffolliott….84

A Mystery Bible Sheet. Thomas G. Bennett…………………………………87

Old Parochial Registers of Scotland: References to Parties from
Ireland. Donald Whyte…………………………………………………………88

The Paternal Ancestry of Oscar Wilde. Brian de Breffny………………….96

Abstracts of Some Skerrett Wills……………………………………………100

The Contents of Burton Hall, Co. Cork, in 1686.
Rosemary ffolliott and Brian de Breffny……………………………………104

Early 19th century Lists of Protestant Parishoners in the
Dioceses of Meath.Rev. C.C. Ellison………………………………………..113

Speranza’s Ancestry – Elgee, the Maternal Lineage of
Oscar Wilde – Corrigenda……………………………………………………..127

Reviews………………………………………………………………………….127

CONTENTS
Vol. VI, No. 1, 1974

Bevan of Limerick. Brian de Breffny………………………………………………1

Employees of the irish Revenue in 1709. Brian de breffny……………………6

Houses in Ireland in the 17th Century. Rosemary ffolliott………………….16

Irish Entries in the 1851 Census Returns of St. Mary’s, Northgate,
Canterbury,Kent. D.W. Harrington and C.J. Perry……………………………..22

Records if Irish Emigrants to Canada in Sussex Archives, 1839-1847
Francis Leeson………………………………………………………………………31

The Journal of an Irish Emigrant to Canada. Donal Begley………………….43

Entries from the Family Bible of Joshua Porter Conway……………………..48

Lost periods. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………49

Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………….53

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..64

CONTENTS
Vol. VI, No. 2, 1974

The Family of Tuke. David R.M. Tuke…………………………………………..67

Entries from the Family Bible of John Smith of Dorset St., Dublin………..73

Collectors of the Revenue in Ireland, Michaelmas, 1678…………………..73
James Holme’s Family Notebook……………………………………………….74

Some Lost Country Houses near Athlone. N.W. English……………………79

Tombstones in Moy Graveyard, near Summerhill, Co. Meath.
Beryl Moore and Josephine Maguire…………………………………………..85

Some newspaper References to irish Immigrants in Oneda Co.
New York. Marilla Grimes………………………………………………………..97

The Surprising Newspapers of Ennis. Rosemary ffolliott……………………98

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1801-1817.
Terence M. Punch…………………………………………………………………101

Abstracts of some Ardagh, Clogher and Kilmore Diocesan Wills………….112

Reviews…………………………………………………………………………….121

CONTENTS
Vol. VII, No. 1, 1975

Letters from Home. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………….1

The Irish Passengers Aboard the ‘New World’, Liverpool-New York,
October-December, 1853………………………………………………………….6

Gray of Cork City and Lehana.
Richard Clarke and Charles Dowman…………………………………………..11

Magistrates of Co. Clare in 1792……………………………………………….14

The Swift Rise and Slow Decline of Frederick Buck
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………15

Entries from the family Bible of William Yeates of Haystown,
Co. Dublin………………………………………………………………………….24

Monumental Inscriptions from the Church and Graveyard at
Kilmacduagh, (Gort), Co. Galway. Brian J. Cantwell…………………………26

Constabulary employed in the District of Moate, Co. Westmeath.
Liam Cox……………………………………………………………………………35

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1818-1825.
Terrence M. Punch…………………………………………………………………39

Index to Killala and Achonry Administration Bonds………………………….55

CONTENTS
Vol. VII, No. 2, 1975

Abstracts of Wills

Extracts from Michael Murphys Commonplace Book
Strutt, Guy : The Hon.

Houses in Provincial Towns
Ffolliott, Rosemary

Magistrates in Co. Clare in 1837
De Breffney, Brian

Margaret Gallagher’s Notebook
Robinson, K.J. Rev.

Memorials from Rathmore, Co. Meath
Moore, B.F. & Cawkhill, Mr. & Mrs.

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia 1826-1830
Punch, Terence M.

CONTENTS
Vol. VIII, No. 1, 1976

Entries from Elizabeth Mettrick’s Family Bible
Mrs. Pounden’s Experiences during the 1798 Rising in Co. Wexford.
Simon L. M. de Montfort…………………………………………………………….4

The Graveyard and Tombstones at Moyagher, Co. Meath.
Beryl F. E. Moore and Mr. and Mrs. John Cawkhill…………………………….9-12

Silver in Dublin. Douglas Bennett………………………………………………..13

Magistrates of Co. Clare in 1819…………………………………………………16

How Waterford City voted in 1807. H. F. Morris …………………………….18-32

lrish Deserters at Halifax, Nova Scotia, during the Napoleonic Wars.
Terrence M. Punch ……………………………………………………………….33-35

Some Game Licences of 1802. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………..35-38

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………4?

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1831-1834.
Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………………………….53

CONTENTS
Vol. VIII, No. 2, 1976

Setting Up House – 1825 Style.
Rev. C.C. Ellison……………………………………………………………………75

The Leading Catholics of Waterford in 1792…………………………………..80

The Passengers on the “Polly”. Terrence M. Punch……………………………82

Game Licences in North-West Ulster in 1802………………………………….84

Robert Craige’s Co. Cavan Tenants, 1703-4.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………….86

Entries from the Family Bible of John Davidson of Co. Down……………….88

The Changing Gardens of Ireland. Rosemary ffolliott………………………..88

Tombstones in Balsoon Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F.E. Moore and Mr. & Mrs. Cawkhill………………………………….94

Agnes Townsend’s Notebook…………………………………………………….96

The 1821 Census Returns for the Parishes of Aglish and
Portnascully, Co. Kilkenny………………………………………………………113

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1834-1840.
Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………………………..124

CONTENTS
1977 ,Vol. IX, No. 1

Entries from the Family Bible of Alexander and Esther Crookshank………….1

Tombstone Inscriptions at Ardcanny,.Co. Limerick.
M. J Dore ………………………………………………………………………………3

Co. Cork Game Certificates, 1802………………………………………………….5

A Moorhouse Family of Dublin, Carlow and Kildare.
B-Ann Moorhouse……………………………………………………………………15

Irishmen in Scottish Census Records
David C. Cargill………………………………………………………………………19

Going of Munster. Rev. C. C. Ellison……………………………………………..21

The 1841 Census Return for Two Townlands in Aglish Parish,
Co. Kilkenny…………………………………………………………………………44

The Cochran Estate. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………..48

Bickerstaff of Glenavy Parish, Co. Antrim.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………….50

Abstracts of some Boyd Wills…………………………………………………….53

Agnes Townsend’s Notebook: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………56

Elizabeth Mettrick’s Family Bible: Corrigenda………………………………….56

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………56

CONTENTS
Vol. IX, No. 2, 1977

Roundwood and the Sharps. Brian de Breffny…………………………………..59

Entries from William and Elizabeth MacDougall’s Family Bible……………….68

Extracts from the Vestry Book and Parish Registers of Kilbeggan,
Co. Westmeath………………………………………………………………………70

The Wonderful Carving on irish Baroque Side-Tables.
Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………………………………74

Protestant Householders in the Parishes of Croagh, Nantinan, Rathkeale
And Kilscannell, Co. Limerick in 1766…………………………………………….77

Irish Ancestors in the “Lost and Found” of the ‘Boston Pilot’,
January-April 1846. Terrence M. Punch…………………………………………..79

Monumental Inscriptions at Loughcrew Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny………………………………………….85

An Inventory of Killeen Castle in 1735-36……………………………………….103

Entries relating to Irish Persons in the Marriage Register of the Parish
Of Portpatrick, Wigtownshire, Scotland…………………………………………..107

The 1851 Census Returns for the Parish of Aglish, Co Kilkenny………………129

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia 1841-1845.
Terrence M. Punch……………………………………………………………………133

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………..146

CONTENTS
Vol. X, No. 2, 1978

Gurly of Wexford and Carlow: the Maternal Lineage of
George Bernard Shaw. Brian de Breffny……………………………………………69

Inhabitants of Graige and Knocktopher, Co. Kilkenny, in 1797………………..73

Entries from the Family Bible of P.J. McNulty…………………………………….76

The Inventory of John Mahon of Strokestown, Co. Roscommon, 1708……….77

Letters from Connaught to a Wild Goose.
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………….81

The Silvermakers of Limerick. Douglas Bennett with Biographical Notes
Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………………………………..99

Some Irish Poor in Lambeth 1834-1846. C. R. Webb…………………………..108

Irish Ancestors in the “Lost and Found” of the ‘Boston Pilot’,
1840-41. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………………..116

Monumental Inscriptions in the Church and Graveyard of Agher,
Co. Meath. Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny…………………………….129

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………..139

CONTENTS
Vol. XI, No. 1, 1979

Our Tenth Birthday. Rosemary fflolliott………………………………………………1

Entries from the Family Bible of Stirling Smith of Rush, Co. Dublin……………..3

Mid-19th Century irish Deserters in New Zealand.
Verna Mossong……………………………………………………………………………4

Some Lists of Mid-18th Century Linen Drapers in South East Ulster…………….9

The Pembertons of Dublin. Brian de Breffny……………………………………….14

Abstracts of Some Neale and O’Neill Wills, Administrations and
Marriage Licence Bonds from the Diocese of Ferns……………………………….27

Household Lists 1826-1838 made by Lady Godfrey of Kilcoleman
Abbey, Co. Kerry. Valerie M. Bary……………………………………………………30

Registers of the First Presbyterian Church of Newry Co. Down.
1779-1796……………………………………………………………………………….45

Tablets and Headstones in the Church and Graveyard of Dunboyne
Church of Ireland, Co. Meath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny…………………………………………….68

CONTENTS
Vol. XI, No. 2, 1979

Baptisms of the first Presbyterian Church of Newry, Co.Down, 1809-1822 ffolliott, Rosemary

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1828. Ellis, Eilish

Tablets & headstones in the Church and graveyard of Dunboyne Church of Ireland, Co. Meath Moore, Beryl F. & Kenny, Michael

The Family Bible of John Ganley of William St., Limerick Cantwell, Brian J.

The hunting Diaries (1863-1872) of Sir John Fermor Godfrey of Kilcoleman Abbey, Co. Kerry Bary, Valerie M.

CONTENTS
Vol. XII, Nos. 1 and 2, 1980

An Investigation into the Connacht Ancestry of Mary Ann Costello,
Mother of George Canning. Brian de Breffny………………………………………2

Some American Roots in Ireland. Paul Martin Doherty…………………………..6

An Inventory of Reynella, Co. Westmeath in 1827……………………………..10

The Hunting Diaries (1873-1881) of Sir John Fermor Godfrey of
Kilcoleman Abbey, Co. Kerry.
Valery M. Bary…………………………………………………………………………13

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1830-31.
Eilish Ellis………………………………………………………………………………26

Entries from the Brady Family Bible……………………………………………….35

Pupils of Samuel Whyte’s School in Dublin, Listed by Him in 1772
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………….36

Emigrant irish: The Crucial First Generation.
Terrence M. Punch……………………………………………………………………43

Co. Carlow Freeholders in 1767……………………………………………………46

The families of Gaughran and Vaughey of Slane, Co. Meath,
as Recorded in Slane Vestry Books, 1738-1862.
C. E. F. Trench……………………………………………………………………….47

Passengers aboard the ‘Buchannon’, Newry to New York,
August, 1765…………………………………………………………………………52

Monumental Inscriptions at Nantinan, Co. Limerick
M. J. Dore…………………………………………………………………………….53

The Will of Mary Lanigan of Cork Hill, Dublin, 1827…………………………..63

Passengers aboard the Thetis, Cork to Bathurst, New Brunswick,
In April, 1837. Paul Delicaet………………………………………………………65

Registers of the First Presbyterian Church of Newry, Co. Down
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………..67

Tombstones in Drumlargan Churchyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F.E. Moore and Josephine Maguire……………………………………82

Canada Company Remittances, 1834. Gerald Merrick………………………..84

County Louth Game Licences in 1813…………………………………………..87

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..89

CONTENTS
Vol. XIII, No. 1, 1981

A family of Mahony in Cos. Kerry and Limerick.
Brian de Breffny………………………………………………………………………1

Mary Flynn’s Register………………………………………………………………..3

Canada Company Remittances, 1844. Gerald Merrick………………………….4

Members of Two Dublin Societies in 1772………………………………………10

The Magans of Umma, Parish of Ballymore, Co. Westmeath.
Liam Cox……………………………………………………………………………..12

Stucco Work by Patrick Osborne at casteltown Cox. Brian de Breffny……..15

“Declaration” against the Repeal of the Union, 1830.
P. Beryl Phair………………………………………………………………………..18

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1832.
Eilish Ellis……………………………………………………………………………37

Registers of the First Presbyterian Church of Newry, Co. Down
Rosemary ffolliott………………………………………………………………….42

Tablets and Headstones in Athboy Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F. E. Moore and Michael Kenny……………………………………….52
Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………….72

Mary Ann Costello: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………………….73

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..73

CONTENTS
Vol. XIII, No. 2

Earbery of Ballincollig and Shandangan, Co. Cork.
Brian de Breffny. ………………………………………………………………….77

Emigration from the Workhouse at Ennistymon, Co. Clare, 1850-1860
Dr. S. C. O’Mahony. ………………………………………………………………79

Luke Mahon’s Inventory. Rosemary ffolliott. …………………………………83

Entries from the Family Bible of Robert and Sarah Jane Kilfeder………….86

Humphrys of Knockfad, Co. Cavan. Brian de Breffny…………………………88

A Quaker Wedding at Lisburn, Co. Down, in 1867
Michael Goodbody………………………………………………………………….90

Some Protestant Householders in the Parishes of Ferns and
Ballycanew and Killtrisk, Co. Wexford in the Late 18th Century……………93

The Earliest Presbyterian Register of Waterford, 1761-1813.
Julian C. Walton……………………………………………………………………94

“Declaration” against the Repeal of the Union, 1830.
P. beryl Phair. …………………………………………………………………….104

Tablets and Headstones in Athboy Old Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny……………………………………….113

A Family of Mahony in Cos. Kerry and Limerick: Corrigenda……………….124

Reviews. …………………………………………………………………………..125

CONTENTS
Vol. XIV, No. 1, 1982

Robinson of Killogeenaghan – a Westmeath Quaker Family.
Liam Cox……………………………………………………………………………….1

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1835
Eilish Ellis……………………………………………………………………………..6

The Family of Fish of Castle Fish, Co. Kildare.
Patrick Montague-Smith……………………………………………………………13

Tenants of P.J. Smyth at Gort, Co. Galway in 1805…………………………..20

Extracts from the Church of Ireland Parish Registers of
Nantinan, Co. Limerick. Viola Reid………………………………………………22

Genealogies of the Lowry Family Bible.
Margaret L. Williams………………………………………………………………24

Gentlemen of the Counties Clare and Limerick who were in
favour of the Union In 1799……………………………………………………..30

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………35

Headstones in St. Mary’s Churchyard, Delvin, Co. Westmeath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny……………………………………….39

CONTENTS
Vol. XIV, No. 2, 1982

The Hopper family. Bruce S. Elliott……………………………………………59

Letters to John Crone of Doneraile, Co. Cork, 1763-1781.
Brian de Breffny………………………………………………………………….74

Emigration from the Limerick Workhouse, 1848-1860.
Dr. S.C. O’Mahony………………………………………………………………..83

Game Licences in Co. Clare, 1803-1821………………………………………95

Canada Company Remittances, January- May 1845.
Gerald Merrick……………………………………………………………………..99

Monumental Inscriptions in the Church of Ireland Parish Graveyard at
Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. M. J. Dore ………………………………………….105
(Note: See Corrigenda for these in Vol. XVI, NO. 1, 1984)

Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………..121

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………126

CONTENTS
Vol. XVI, No. 1, 1984

The Turpin family of Tullamore, Co. Offaly
Robert W. Brown……………………………………………………………………..1

Businessmen of Ennis, Co. Clare, early in the Napoleonic Wars……………..6

Tombstones in Clady Graveyard, Bective, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F.E. Moore and Mrs. Josephine Maguire……………………………….9

The Co. Cork Ancestry of the Maddens of Travencore, Melbourne
Australia. Stirling Macoboy………………………………………………………..14

Captain Balfour’s Auction, 15th March 1741-2.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………..21

The Family of Dr. Samuel Bryson of Holywood, Co. Down.
Joseph Clint and Roger Blaney……………………………………………………32

A List of Protestants in the Barony of Mohill, Co. Leitrim in 1792………….35

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1836.
Eilish Ellis…………………………………………………………………………….37

Two Lists of Persons Resident in the Vicinity of Newcastle,
Co. Limerick in 1793 and 1821……………………………………………………40

Irish Soldiers Stationed on the Coast of Coromandel in India on
31st December, 1766. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………45

Monumental Inscriptions in the Church of Ireland Parish Graveyard at
Rathkeale, Co. Limerick Corrigenda……………………………………………..53

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………54

CONTENTS
Vol. XVI, No. 2, 1984

The Romance of the Secret Ancestor. Rosemary ffolliott……………………..57

Markham of Nunstown and Callinafercy, Co. Kerry.
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………..60

Census of Protestants in the Parishes of Shanrahan and Tullagherton,
Co. Tipperary in 1864-1870.
Rev. Iain Knox……………………………………………………………………….61

The Peppards of Cappagh, Co. Limerick. Brian de Breffny……………………68

Devonsher of Co. Cork. Rosemary ffolliott………………………………………71

Register of Pupils of Doncarney School, Co. Meath in 1873.
Michael Ward………………………………………………………………………..75

Protestant Householders in the Parish of Templecrone,
Co. Donegal in 1799, With a list of the Churchwardens of the same
parish, 1775-1900. Rev. Iain Knox……………………………………………….78

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1835-6. Eilish Ellis……………………..80

Edouart in Ireland. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………….107

The Burgalry at William Leeson’s House, Bolingbroke, Co. Tipperary
In 1785. Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………………….118

Captain Balfour’s Auction – Addenda……………………………………………121

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..122

CONTENTS
Vol. XVIII, No. 1, 1985

Lost Estates and Vanished Glories. Brian de Breffny……………………….1

Extracts from the Church of Ireland Registers of Dunshaughlin,
Co. Meath, 1803-1837. Raymond Refaussé…………………………………..2

Ffolliott of Cork.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………4

The Rev. James Hopwell’s Will. Anne M. Storey……………………………..8

Emigration from the Workhouse of Nenagh Union,
Co. Tipperary, 1849-1860. Dr. S. C. O’ Mahony…………………………….10

A daughter’s Recollections of the Langfords of Kilcosgriff,
Co. Limerick. Randolf Vigne……………………………………………………18

Game Licences for Co. Offaly and Co. Galway in 1821…………………….23
Census of Parishoners in Clogheen Union, Co. Tipperary in 1873,

1877 and 1880. Rev. Iain Knox………………………………………………..25
Up for Sale. Ada K. Longfield (Mrs. Leask), M.R.I.A………………………..30

The Rev. Edward Bacon’s Register.
Rev. Iain Knox……………………………………………………………………35

Voters in the Limerick City Election of 1817. Rosemary ffolliott…………49

CONTENTS
Vol. XVII, No. 2, 1985
The Reverend John Chaloner.
Desmond Chaloner……………………………………………………………….59

Some Household Auctions advertised in ‘Finns’s Leinster Journal’
in the 1790’s. Ada K. Longfield (Mrs. Leask)………………………………..63

The Morrogh’s of Kilworth, Co. Cork.
Francis J. Vaughan………………………………………………………………66

The Huguenot Family of Rambaut in Ireland.
Philip Marland Rambaut………………………………………………………..70

The Tenants of Sir Hugh Dillon Massey, near Clonlara in
Co. Clare, in 1844. John Bourke………………………………………………72

The Chief Inhabitants of the Parishes of St. Mary’s and St. John’s,
Limerick, in 1813………………………………………………………………..75

The Mitchells of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork, and of London.
Leslie R.V. Mitchell and Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………77

Notes on some Portarlington Families, 1860-1893
Harold J. Storey…………………………………………………………………82

The Rev. Edward Bacon’s Register.
Rev. Iain Knox………………………………………………………………….96

Reviews………………………………………………………………………..116

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Glimpses of Ireland From Old Books

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Extract from My Ireland, written by Kate O’Brien, first published 1962. Out of print. From Antrim and Belfast.

“When I walked into the hotel in Cushendall on a bright, cold Wednesday afternoon, the first Wednesday in March, I was puzzled to find on each open, welcoming brow that turned towards, me a central smudge of black. Schooldays, Mother Philomena, Sister Bernard -I remembered. Ah yes – Ash Wednesday! But this is Antrim! I am in the north! And so I learnt to my surprise that the population of the Glens of Antrim is almost ninety per cent Roman Catholic. A point of no relevance, save that it was dramatically, amusingly, presented to me by the admonition, “Remember man that thou art dust”, written on every forehead in a remote, lovely village to which I came a stranger with misconceptions.

I can hardly have had misconceptions about the look of this region, however, for the coast and glens of Antrim are renowned, as Kerry is. Placed diagonally to each other, north and south, the two counties have long been clich?s for scenic beauty in Ireland. And undeniably they are superb; endearing also, their lovers tell us. But in neither case am I in that secret, but only an acquaintance standing about in admiration, presuming nothing and keeping the word love under cover.

I had what old-fashioned people call ‘great crack’ in Cushendall. I wonder does Mrs Stone remember me? She has a pleasant, low- ceilinged shop – stationery, postcards, rosary beads – and she lives alone in a deep old house behind it.

She is old herself; she says she is over ninety, and her memories justify her claim, but she suggests an ascetic and very handsome seventy. Her eyes shine starrily in a pale, aristocratic face and grey-white hair sweeps off her temples poet-fashion; she is lean and moves quickly, and she looks at and listens to everything alive with an open interest which is at once benevolent and critical. She was born into poverty and hard work in Belfast; and, without any hyperbole, she must have been one of the most beautiful and thoroughbred-looking girls that ever stepped anywhere in Ireland. Marriage brought her at twenty years of age to Cushendall and the little shop. And ever since she has watched and loved the Glens, their glamour, their legends, their people and their history. She has read all her life, eclectically and impatiently; and she has kept informed of the world and events. She has talked with high and low, loves to talk with all sorts. She was born an intellectual, every experience and observation filters through her analytic brain. She is, indeed, an original – one does not meet her like. And that not merely because now, over ninety, she is so handsome, so gracious and witty and, unwillingly, so clear a reproach to us all – but always she must have stood alone, I think.

Mrs Stone is a woman who speaks of the past lightly, and with no pause or drag for sentiment. She remembers neatly – and if she does not she tosses the attempt behind her. So, nothing of a bore!

Our first conversation settled it that we were to get acquainted. I was in her dark shop looking at postcards – and a poor selection they were. I had just come up the Antrim West Road and entered the Glens for the first time in my life; I was under the impression of the noble sights of the day, and I babbled, I suppose, and asked ignorant questions. These were answered with humour and charm so I dawdled about the shop. There were old Penguins* and Magazines; turning them over I talked of some writer or other who had known the Glens, and we went on a bit about books. It came out that I wrote, and I was amused at the care and light courtesy with which that fact was received. None of your “Oh, indeed! Isn’t that wonderful? Imagine it!” technique. In fact, Mrs Stone was almost too calm in getting past the dangerous boredom of ‘writer’ talk. But, a few sentences later, Limerick and surnames coming up she suddenly paused and smiled very accentedly. “Ah! I see! Ah – You do really write.”

She had got my name, and it happened that she had read and liked my novels, or some of them. So now, since I truly was a published professional, and in her opinion a good one, she could talk about books and writers without discomfort.
It was refreshing – this non-conformity.
“Why were you so cool at first when I said I was a writer?”
“Ah – it’s often difficult! So many ladies, and gentlemen, tell you that they write, you know – and then, there’s nothing more to be said!”

But we found between us much to say. Mrs Stone, though at case with local legends, ghosts and ‘tall’ stories, and with the passions of history and event – all crowded and pressed up and down the Glens – preferred to talk of living people, or of events and people within her ninety years. Good and true enough Finn MacCool’s palatial caverns up along Glenariff, and Ossian’s grave too, and tales of history and invention all about, but Mrs Stone referred one to Professor De Largy for all such. And was he not the best reference, being child and son of this very Cushendall? Herself however liked in our evening talks to argue about the art of writing and about modern writers-poets and novelists her chief targets. She is a severe critic, sometimes severe, as I thought and said, irrelevantly to literature. I had to fight hard for some twentieth-century novelists whom I know to be good, whatever Mrs Stone may say. But pleasure of our talk lay in its being more accurate than its kind often is, because we confined it to works we really knew. And she had much to tell me of writers and others of Irish fame who in her time had lived in or frequented the Glens and who had known her shop and her fireside.

She remembered Standish O’Grady, for instance, and laughed softly, sixty-five or more years beyond it, over some exaggerated impatience of his one day about a bicycle. She re-created the kind of angry charm he may have had -and we agreed as to our happy past delight in The Bog of Stars. She had known Alice Milligan, and ‘Eithne Carbery’; and the poet of Songs of the Glens of Antrim had been a life-neighbour of Cushendall. Mrs Stone knew many younger poets and folklorists too, and some of the uncompromising Ulster patriots of before 1916 – Bulmer Hobson, for instance, and Denis McCullough, and Roger Casement.

Of the last she spoke with some poignancy. “When he was only a lad I used to argue with him, here in this shop. He was a beautiful young boy, God bless him. Do you think they’ll ever let us bring him home? His place is ready for him, you know, just on the shore up there, under Tor Head. He should be at home in Antrim – instead of where he is, the child!” She looked at me shrewdly. “There was nothing bad in Roger Casement,” she said. “I’d have known, I think, if he was bad. Oh, he was foolish. He had wild ideas, and often I told him they were impossible – nonsensical. The way he’d laugh at that! I can see him now, sitting up there on that counter, swinging his legs, and talking nonsense!”

The last night I was in Cushendall I talked over Mrs Stone’s fire until half-past one in the morning. And then she insisted on walking the length of the street with me to my hotel. It was a clear, cold night, very still; we could bear the gentle voice of the sea off to the left. At the hotel door I wanted to walk her home again – after all, she is over ninety. But she wouldn’t hear of it. She thrust a great roll of paper into my hands. “It’s foolscap,” she said, “hard to get now. Do you write on it?”
I told her that indeed I always did, when I could get it, but that I could not take that great roll from her.
“You must,” she said. “It’s a present. Cover it with good words.” And off she turned, over the bridge and down the moonlit street as quick as a boy, in her grey tweed coat.

Extract from ‘Irish Miles’ : Author Frank O’Connor, published 1947. Out of print.
Roscrea, Monaincha, sayings and a bit on the Birch family:

“When I asked the boots in Roscrea the way to Monaincha, pronouncing it as it is spelled, he said he had never heard of it. “Would it be Monaheensha ? ” he asked, and of course, Monaheensha it was, and already it began to assume an existence outside the pages of a guide-book.

Roscrea is one of the most charming of Irish towns – potentially at least. It is tossed about in choppy country of little hills which you find looking at you from the end of every street; streets of pleasant little houses with sculped-in doorways ; a fine castle on the hilly main street with a magnificent Queen Anne house in stone built in the courtyard, and a Franciscan abbey with a sentimental little tower behind.

But the best thing in it is the fragment of a parish church which was abandoned at the beginning of the last century merely because the Protestant Church Sustentation Fund would advance money only for new buildings, not for the restoration of old ones. It now consists of nothing but a west wall, and it is remarkable that even this has survived, for a main road was driven clean through the monastery enclosure, isolating the belfry in a garage at the opposite side of the road.

It had poured steadily all the evening, and the wet, woodbine-coloured light was bringing out all the gold in the spongy yellow sandstone while the churchyard sulked behind in a cold, cavernous, sea-green light. It was a recollection of Cormac’s Chapel; a porch set in an arcade of four arches, each with a pediment that echoed the pediment of the porch and what (before they lowered the level of the roof and tacked on the little bell-cote) must have been a high gable. It was fearfully worn, for the chalky stone laps up the rain like blotting-paper, and the saint in the pediment and the heads on the capitals had almost crumbled away; but it still had some of the elegance of Cashel, the same sense of a civilised life directing it. The exterior arches were ornamented, the inner ones plain : the variation was Irish, the symmetry European.

We arrived in the heel of the evening at Roscrea, and, suddenly turning a right-angled bend, found ourselves passing this plain little Romanesque front. …………I returned to the little church just as the shadow had worked up to the level of the roof, and the little bell-cote seemed to float on the air, and stood there looking at it till darkness fell. I could barely remember a time when I didn’t understand what people meant when they talked in poetry and music, and before I could read or write I understood the music of ‘How Dear to Me the Hour when Daylight Dies’ and the poetry of
“Though lost to Momonia and cold in the grave
He returns to Kincora no more.”

……. it wasn’t until I found myself delighting in a row of little eighteenth-century houses by a river that I realised the art with which a builder erects a house so that to the memory it spells ‘home’.
We left the main road and turned along a bumpy bog road with a disused distillery at the top of it, and there came to us over the ridges of it a long procession of high blue-and-orange creels, laden with turf the heads of the little asses forced level with the shafts. It was drawing on to dusk; the fields were filled with brown rushes, and where the ground rose out of the bog to right and left there were groves of beeches, black with rain and bronzed with mast. The smell of burning turf clung like mist to the ground.

And then where the narrow road made a sudden bend over-hung with beeches we came to a wicket gate in a demesne wall. It was a gate I shan’t forget in a hurry because the sagging wall had pulled it awry ’till it looked like a mouth in a paralysed face; and quite suddenly there flashed before my mind a picture of a winter night glittering with frost and a cart with a little candle lamp, rattling home from Roscrea. There was a child sitting at the back of the cart, and as it passed the gate he drew a bit of sacking over his head because he was afraid of the ghosts.

I saw it quite plainly because I was the child on the cart, and I was terrified of the ghosts. I pulled up and said to “This is a place they see ghosts in”…….Now, I had no idea that the fields where the rushes were growing was once a wide lake, or that the church we were going to see stood on a one-time island called in all mediaeval documents Insula Viventium because nobody was supposed to be able to die on it, and when they got really ill, had to be sent across to the mainland. I found that out weeks after.

The only one of the island churches that remains stood on a hillock in the middle of the boglands with a wall of beeches about it; three bare cottage gables, the one that faced us touched by the woodbine-coloured light till it was one tone with the trees. A muddy lane led to the little Protestant cemetery where the graves were marked with small flat slabs of sandstone from the church roof or tiny ornaments from the Early English windows. The doorway had been restored by somebody with no eye for the tapering. I didn’t realise until I started looking at English churches, which all seemed for some reason to be standing to attention, how much of the character of Irish ones depends on the diminishing perspective of windows, doors, gables and towers that makes them all seem to be standing easy, legs spread, firmly based on the landscape.

Yet it still gave the church its atmosphere; a touch of -Egypt, of the hooded falcon in the high-shouldered pilasters gripped as in a steel band by the frieze of capitals, it certainly wasn’t the charming little chancel arch, woman-curved, with smooth columns, scalloped capitals and a web of smoothly flowing superficial ornament, the colour of red bronze in the evening light, nor the thirteenth-century cast window which opened on to a clump of sunlit beeches. There was a family called Birch buried inside; one was described as a native of London.

The cold drove us away at last, the penetrating cold that comes out of half-reclaimed land. We had disturbed the haunt of some yokels who were having the time of their lives, trying to scare us by popping up over walls and through window openings. When we came out it was just as if the church were islanded again because all round us was a lake of white mist, with the lamps twitching in the little cottages upon its banks.

We came back next morning when the sun was shining brightly and the gaily-coloured carts were clattering back to the bog, but the little church seemed to cling to its secret. One of the minor pleasures of architecture is the way in which buildings which haven’t been too much looked at seem to secrete some- thing of what they have experienced. Monaincha somehow suggested remoteness. It wasn’t a place you could ever grow fond of Perhaps it has seen too much. In the Middle Ages it had been a place of mystery. In the Penal Days it had been a place of refuge, and Catholics put off in boats at dawn from the shores around to hear Mass said by some hunted priest. Then the Birches came, drained the lake, buried their dead in the chancel and removed the church of the nuns to make decorations for their new garden. But the old church waited in its remoteness.

“The family”, said the old cattle dealer with whom we cycled on to Borris-in-Ossory, “is now extinct.” I guessed his business from the switch tied to the lady’s bicycle he was riding in the place where the cross-bar would normally be He was going to Borris to complete a deal, and it would not be binding without the traditional touch of ‘the rod’.

He was a chirpy, light-hearted old man and a great repository of traditional topographical lore like “wracked and wrecked like Mitchelstown”; “wherever the devil is by day, he’s in Cappawhite by night”; Carlow, “poor but proud”; and Leix, “poor, proud and beggarly; kiss you and cut your throat”. (The woman in the pub in Rathdowney solemnly assured us of the exactness of the last statement, and added the further information that while the most respectable Tipperary man would appear on Sundays with an open neck, a Leix man wouldn’t even go to the workhouse without a collar and tie on.) When we asked what he thought of Clare men he merely groaned. In fact, the only foreigners he had a good word to say for were Kerry men. “A good Kerry man is as good a man as you’ll meet.”
“And what part are ye coming from ?” he asked. “Monaincha,” said I.
“Monaincha?” he exclaimed in surprise. “What were ye doing in Monaincha?”
“Looking at the old church,” said I. “Ye didn’t see any ghosts?” he asked. “No,” said I, but at the same time my heart gave a bit of a jump. “Are there ghosts ?”
“The place is full of them,” he said. “Ye didn’t happen to see a little gate in a wall by the bend of the road?”
“We did,” said I. “Is it there the ghosts are seen?” “The very place,” he said. “There’s people wouldn’t pass that place after dark.”

The little gate, it seemed, led to the Birches’ garden, and he told us about the Birches and their distillery…………”

Foreword (written by Eamonn Kelly) for the ‘Stone Mad for Music. The Sliabh Luachra Story’

Author: Donal Hickey. Published by Marino Books.
ISBN 1 86023 097 0

I often say to myself, ‘Is Sliabh Luachra a place or a state of mind?’ Something of both, I suppose. The exact borders of the territory are never very clear to me. Some say they form a triangle from Millstreet to Killarney with its apex in Castleisland. By the base of the triangle is Cathair Chrobhdhearg, known locally as the City, a place of pilgrimage going back to the time when Homer was a boy.

Rising to the south of the City are Na Cionna, the Paps. In Irish these twin mountains of great grandeur are called AnDá Chích Dannan, the Breasts of the Goddess Dana. From either summit, I am told, one gets the best view of Sliabh Luachra, a wild landscape of bog and farmland reclaimed from the moor. The Abhainn Uí Chriadha, which carried the famous moving bog of a century ago, makes its way to the Flesk, and the white straight-as-a-dye by-road runs from Bealnadeega to Guilane before it turns cast to the area’s capital, Gneeveguilla.

Donncha Ó Céilleachair in his biography (co-written with Pronsias Ó Conluain) of an tAthair Pádraig Ua Duinnín called the Paps the Olympus of Ireland, where the gods of the old Celts lived. From their front doors the poets Aodhagán Ó Rathaille and Eoghan Rua Ó Súilleabháin saw these mountains each morning as they rose to sniff the air, and they were ever their inspiration.

I heard an old man say that before the Elizabethan plantations Sliabh Luachra was a wilderness. Men who had been deprived of their rich Munster lands found shelter within the triangle and wrenched a place to live from the moorland.

All my people had their roots in Sliabh Luachra, and when my Auntie Bridgie sat down to trace relationships it seemed to us children that we were connected by blood to a great many people in that place.

Later when we lived at Carrigeen in Glenfiesk my mother would send me at the age of ten to walk all the way to Gullane with news of our well-being for my grandfather and grandmother. From our house to theirs was a tidy step, and even in the daylight I was fearful passing Béalnadeaga because of a story my mother told us about that crossroads. A spirit used to appear there at the dead of night and men out late were frightened to death by her. She had the power to drag a man from a galloping horse, and was said to blind her victim by squirting her breast-milk into his eyes.

Priests came to bless the place where she haunted, but the spirit remained until a holy friar in a brown habit read over the spot. His reading of Latin was effective. He banished the spirit to the Dead Sea and the sentence he pronounced on her was that she should drain its waters with a silver spoon for all eternity.

During these visits to Gullane I remember meeting Charlie O’Leary, the last Irish speaker of Sliabh Luachra. When I was older and able to understand Irish he said to me,’Duine de mhuintir Chíosain tusa.’

‘I am not,’ I said. ‘My name is Kelly.’

‘Then your mother was a Kissane,’ he persisted. ‘No,’ I told him, ‘her name was Cashman.’

‘Ah, that explains it,’ he said. ‘The first man of your mother’s name to come to these quarters to rent a bit of land was asked by Lord Kenmare’s agent, “What is your name?” “Tadhg Ó Cíosáin,” the man answered. “I am tired of unpronounceable and unwritable names,” said the agent. “From now on you are Cashman.” The new name went down in the book and my ancestor lost his Gaelic nomenclature.

Donncha Ó Céilleachair, who interviewed Charlie O’Leary when he was researching the book on Father Dineen, told me that Charlie could recite Eoghan Rua’s verse and, unusually, he had an air to each poem to which he sang the lines.

Though the neighbouring men sitting around my father’s fire when I was small knew no Irish they had a wealth of stories about Eogban Rua. It seems he was one day going to Cork and outside Millstreet a school-master picked up something from the road and said to Eoghan, “Look at that, I am in luck for the day – I found a horseshoe.”

“No doubt,” Eogban remarked, “education is a wonderful thing. I wouldn’t know whether that was a horseshoe or a mare’s shoe.”

The parish priest calling out the names of those who hadn’t paid their dues enquired, “Where is Eoghan Ó Súilleabháin?” Eoghan answered and the priest asked, “Are you Eoghan a’ Dirrín?” “Ní mé,” arsa Eoghan, “ach Eoghan a’ bhéil bhinn.””

Sweet, melodious and eloquent was Eoghan’s voice, and those characteristics are evident today when a Gneeveguilla man or woman gets up to sing. And men still follow Eoghan’s trade of making noise. When I was young we looked forward on Saturday to the Cork Weekly Examiner for the songs of my mother’s cousin, the Bard of Knocknagree, one Ned Owen Buckley.

Snatches of a ballad I recall which lamented the passing of an aged neighbour. After more than a modicum of praise for the departed soul, each verse ended with the line, ‘But he wasn’t long going in the end.’
Nowadays at the mention of Sliabhh Luachra we think of music and song, storytelling and dancing. The music of Denis Murphy – that divine fiddler – is in the archives of RTÉ, and every time I hear it my feet itch for the flagged kitchen floor from which we knocked sparks when I was growing up. My friend and relative Johnny O’Leary played the button accordeon and accompanied Denis Murphy’s fiddle. Johnny is among those who carry on the tradition.
Sliabh Luachra features in the stories of Fionn Mac Cumhail’s time that tradition has handed down to us. It was from there that Bodach an Chóta Lachtna, that great big ugly laughing clown, set out to race the Greek hero Caol an larainn, all the way to the Hill of Howth.
Sliabh Luachra is as vital today as it ever was. Long may it be so, whether it is a state of mind or a mystic moorland defined by an isosceles triangle.

Extract from RAMBLES IN EIRINN – William Bulfin.

1907 Out Of print: Chapter II

Around Lough Gill – Knockarea – Sligo – The Lake – The Hills – The Valley of O’Rourke – Drumahaire – O’Rourke’s Table

“Had I hearkened to the oracular guidance of a road book, edited by a West Briton, which had cost me a shilling, I would have gone to Sligo by train, for, according to the book, the road from Dublin to Sligo is “is an uninteresting route and road in-different.” But a month’s experience had taught me that the most I could expect from this book was an occasional piece of unconscious humour.

The “uninteresting route” alluded to above is really one of the most interesting in all Ireland. It crosses the magnificent plain of Meath, passing close to Tara. It takes you past scores of historic and beautiful places in fair Westmeath of the lakes. It leads you over the most picturesque of the Longford uplands; and whether you decide to cross the Shannon at Lanesborough or at Carrick, it shows you the hills of Annaly of the O’Ferralls, and gives you the choice of a look at beautiful Lough Ree, or a ramble through the delightful country between Newtownforbes and Drumsna.

When You Cross the Shannon the Sligo road takes you over the Connacht plains and brings you within sight of royal Cruachain, It leads you into Boyle, and thence through the Pass of the Curlews, or you have an alternative road to Sligo round the northern spur of the Curlews by the rock of Doon, and the shore of Lough Key and to Sligo by Knocknarea.

“An uninteresting route?” Not if you are Irish and know some of the history of your land, and feel some pleasure in standing beside the graves of heroes and on ground made sacred by their heroism. Not if you delight to see the hay-making, and the turf cutting, and in observing the simple, beautiful life of rural Ireland. Not if you are at home among the boys and girls at the crossroads in the evening time, or if you know how to enjoy a drink of milk and a chat with the old people across the half door, or on a stool beside the hearth. Not if you love the woods and the mantling glory of waving corn ripening in the sun, and the white, winding roads made cool on the hottest day by the shade of flower-laden hedges.

But if you are one of those tired and tiresome souls desirous only of treading in the footsteps of the cheap trippers who follow one another like sheep, if you have no eye of your own for the beautiful, and if you think it your duty to go out of your way to put money into the pockets of vampire railways, then in the name of all the Philistines and seoinini take the train, or stay away out of the country altogether, or go to some peepshow and surfeit your narrow photographic soul on “views.”

The road over the Curlew Mountains from Boyle is a grand one. If you are an average roadster you can pedal up the greater part of the gradient. They tell a story in Boyle of a man who negotiated the mountains in night time without becoming aware of it. He said, when asked how he had found the roads that they were all right, but that he thought he had met a sort of a long hill somewhere. He was either a champion rider or a humorist.

Anyhow the ordinary tourist will have to get off his machine for a few steep zigzags. The rest is nothing more formidable than a good tough climb. You can rest now and then and admire the spreading plains behind you to the eastward. You can see into Mayo and Galway to your right, and Boyle is just below you, the old abbey lifting its twelfth century gables over the trees. To your left is beautiful Lough Key.

A little higher up you come to the verge of the battlefield of the Curlews. They call it Deerpark or some such history-concealing name now. Ballaghboy is what the annalists call it. You can see the stone erected on the spot where Clifford, the English general, fell. You can see where the uncaged Eagle of the North prepared for his swoop, and the heart within you leaps as your eye follows adown the slope the line of his victorious onset. God’s rest and peace be with your soul, Red Hugh! You were a sensible, practical patriot, although there is no big tower one hundred and goodness knows how many feet high erected to your memory on Ireland’s ground. And although you had no blatant press to give you high-sounding names and sing your praises to the world, you believed that liberty was worth the best blood in your veins, and you did not waste breath on windy resolutions. And when you raised your hand, a bouchal, it was not the everlasting hat that you held out in it to the gaze of the nations, for it had that in it which was worthy of Ireland and of you. ‘Twas something that gleamed and reddened and blazed and that flashed the light of wisdom and duty into the souls of manly men. After passing Ballaghboy the road leads upward into the fastnesses of the Curlews, where for a while the world is shut off. The heath-clad summits of the peaks hem you in. For about a mile you ride in this solitude and then suddenly there is a turn and the world comes back again. Below you the valleys and woods are alternating in the near distance. In front of you is a green hillside dotted with farm houses. There, too, is Lough Arrough, and beyond it, away in the hazy distance, is the purple bulk of Slieveanierin and the gray masses of Knocknarea and Benbulben. Ten minutes will bring you to the town of Ballinafad. The road from here to Sligo is a grand one for the cyclist. It is smooth and level nearly all the way. After a few miles of this pleasant road you come to an ancient-looking demesne. The timber is old and lofty, the wall along the roadside is moss-grown, the undergrowth beneath the oaks and pines is thick and tangled. This is the Folliat or Folliard estate. It is where the scene of “Willie Reilly” is laid. Here lived the “great Squire Folliard” and his lovely daughter – the heroine of one of the most popular of Anglo-Irish love tales, and the subject of a ballad that has been sung in many lands:

“Oh! rise up, Willie Reilly, and come along with me!”

The suggestion of the metre must have come to the balladist in the lilt of some old traditional air of Connacht. I have nearly always heard it sung in the Irish traditional style – the style which lived on even after the Irish language had fallen into disuse. I, have heard it sung in two hemispheres – by the Winter firesides of Leinster and under the paraiso trees around the homes of the Pampas. I had followed it around the world, through the turf smoke and bone smoke – through the midges and mosquitoes and fire-flies. I was glad to find that I had run it to earth at last, so to speak.

There is a gloom over the Folliat demesne now. The shadow of a great sorrow is on it. A few years ago a daughter of the house went out on the lake in a boat to gather water lilies for her affianced lover, who was returning that evening to her after a long absence. She was drowned. They were to have been married in a day or two. The place has never been the same since then.

Collooney was meant by nature for great things. The river flowing by the town supplies it with immense water power. Under the rule of a free people, Collooney would be an important manufacturing centre. At present it is a mere village, struggling to keep the rooftrees standing. There are various mills beside the river, some of them, I fear, silenced forever. There is a woollen factory which is evidently trying conclusions with the shoddy from foreign mills. It is engaged in an uphill fight, but I hope it is winning. After passing the woollen factory you cross the bridge, and, skirting a big hill, you drop down on the Sligo road, which takes you through one of the battlefields of ’98.

The battle was fought close to the town. On the 5th of September, 1798, the advance guard of Hum- bert’s little army arrived at Collooney from Castlebar. Colonel Vereker, of the Limerick militia, was there from Sligo with some infantry, cavalry and artillery. He was beaten back to Sligo, and he lost his artillery. Humbert then marched to Drumahaire and thence towards Manorhamilton, but suddenly wheeling he made for Longford to join the Granard men. Ballinamuck followed. , Bartholomew Teeling and Matthew Tone (brother of Theobald Wolfe Tone) were among the Irish prisoners who surrendered with Humbert to Lord Cornwallis. They were executed a few days afterward in Dublin.”

“Close beside the road on a rocky hill they have erected a monument to Teeling. The statue, which is heroic in its expression, looks toward the “Races of Castlebar” and reminds one of that splendid day. One uplifted hand grasps a battle-flag. The face is a poem, grandly eloquent in its chiselling. You think you can catch the thought that was in the sculptor’s mind. You can feel that his aim was to represent his hero looking out in fiery appeal and reproach over the sleeping West!

Sligo should by right be a great Irish seaport town, but if it had to live by its shipping interests it would starve in a week. Like Galway, it has had such a dose of British fostering and legislation that it seems to be afraid of ships and the ships seem to be afraid of it. The city lives independently of its harbour, which it holds in reserve for brighter and greater days. There are, as far as one can judge, three Sligos – the Irish Sligo, the ascendancy Sligo and the Sligo which straddles between ascendancy and nationalism. The Gaelic League is strong in the city, and one of the hardest workers in the West when I was there was Father Hynes.

Sligo is very picturesquely situated. Knocknarea guards it on one side and Benbulbin on the other. The hills which face the city to the northward are very beautiful, and beyond and above their fresh verdure are the rocky heights that beat off the keen and angry winds from the Atlantic. You ride down into the streets from a hill which overtops the steeples, and it is only when you come into the suburbs that you can see the bay. Clear and calm it looks from the Ballysodar’s road, but, alas! not a smoke cloud on the whole of it, not a sail in view, not a masthead over the roofs along the water front. The harbour is not, of course, entirely deserted. A steamer or a long boat comes in now and then. The same thing happens in Galway.

But I am not comparing the two cities, because there is no comparison between them. Galway drags on an existence. Sligo is very much alive. Galway went to the bad when its ocean trade was killed. Sligo is able to maintain itself by doing business with the district in which it is situated. Behind Galway there was no populous and fertile land near enough to be a support to business. Behind Sligo are the valleys which support a relatively thriving rural population.”

This section of this website will give with extracts from books and journals which in one way or another give some glimpse of the character of a person or a place, or the Irish in general. The extracts will change from time to time, new ones added and old ones taken away. The title and the name of the place however, will remain in the Name and Surname indices section of this web site and can be shown in the future to anyone who has an interest in either.

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Military Index, 1832

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On the shelves in the National Archives of Ireland are some indices – books – and these books are indexed in a number of ways – the general title is ‘Index of Official Papers’. For most of the years, they have this title – but then for some of the years, there are Military or other indices with information separated from the general run of the mill official index for that year.

There is information in these as to the movements of various regiments – the simple fact of groups being overcome by cholera or some such gives us an idea of the times that diseases were present in certain places or all of Ireland. There are references to marriage records in here – requests from people for the effects of some other person, indicating relationships.

All the indices are indexed alphabetically – in the general indices then there may be a cross reference back to another letter of the alphabet in order to find the reference number.

The reference for any document is the number – what you see here has not been checked against the original and only covers items to ‘O’. As it stands, it simply gives you the researcher an idea of a resource that is not mentioned or rarely mentioned in lists of Irish genealogical resources.

Whilst the majority of th original documents may not be extant, the indices are still an extremely important resourse. To the best of my knowledge these have not yet been placed on microfilm.

Article: A

21. Anderson, John – Certificate of his services in 23rd Dragoons
45. Artillery Royal permitted to exercise in the Phoenix Park
79. Adj. Genl Depy. – respecting blank routes
011. Armstrong, Captn. – Soliciting appointment of District Adjt. At Cork
016 Artillery Royal – Passage to the Colonies of the Wives of Soldiers of.
114. Adg. Genl. Depy – Blank Routes
121 Adj Genl. Depy. – Requesting a list of names & stations of Yeom Brigade Majors
135. Armit & Boroughs – Franking of remittances &c.
319. Adjt. Genl. Depy – requesting a supply of blank routes
321. Antrim Mila (Militia) Jas. S. Moore, Esq., Junr., appointed Captain in.
332 Antrim Mila (Militia) Resignation of Ensign Di?ckey.
332 Antrim Mila – Appointment of A. Dunlop Esq., ?vied?

B

17 Bryen, Henry – Enquiry requesting Billets
30. Beard, Geo., a Deserter committed to the Bridewell at Newry
60. Brennan, M. D. Article in Tralee Mercury resp Mila allowances &c.
901. Benson, Lieut. – Representation respecting the 50th Regt.
104. Byrne, Mr. Gunpowder Vender – Robbery of
130 Beresford, Lt. Col., discontinued as Asst. Lr. Master General
133. Burdett, Mrs. Applying for copies of correspondence between her and Mrs. Goulbarn
144. Billeting of the Troops – Circular letter respecting
147. Billets to be provided by the Constables of Parishes
177. Bingham, M. Genl. Sir George to command the troops during Sir. H. Vivian’s absence
209. Brown, Mrs. Rebecca – Enquiry respecting the property of Capn. Phillips 44th Foot.
210. Brown, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
212 Basworth, Private John. Attendance required at the Kilkenny Assizes
213. Brannon, Private, Thos. Sentence of transportation passed
227. Borehan, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
241. Brereton, Private Martin, false information of, respecting Mr. Going’s murder
240. Boyle, Edwd. – Transported for Desertion
244. Brady, Lieut., respecting the delay in issuing his half pay
259. Burke, Bridget – respecting her son John Burke
261.Bulkankle, Jas. Sentence of transportation against.
267. Brannon, Private, Thos. – Struck off the ?52nd (or 32nd) Foot
2601 Blacke, Richd. Application for a commuted allowance &c.
2901 Brown, Private Fredk. Court Martial upon
305 Buchan, Major Gen. Sir John appointed on the Staff protempore
307 Bishop, Lieut. Respecting his Mila half pay in the event of his joining Don Pedro’s Service.
314 Bat?lie, John. Praying for a pension
327 Blakeney, M. Genl. Sir E. appointed to command the Troops pre temporare
347 Bishop, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of.

C

12 Campbell, Sir Guy 2nd Mr Genl. March of troops to Cashel & elsewhere
30 Corry, Trevor. Report respecting Geo Beard a Deserter
37 Carlow Militia. Arms to be conveyed to Dublin
301 Campbell, M. Genl. Respecting Mily accommodation at Carndonagh
43 Cavan Mila. Agreement for hire of accommodation of
50 Carlow Mila. John J. Cornwall to be Major in
51 Cork North Mila. Mr. Temple French Esq., to be Lt. Colonel in
91 Collins, Winifred. Praying for a passage for her husband a Soldier
99 Convicts. Escort for an Route to Kingstown
115 Callegy, John. Claim to a pension
119 Creagan, Eleanor. Praying for a free passage to her son at Woolwich.
120 Cork – Local inspr of the Gaol acknowledging Mutiny Act.
144 Circular letter respecting the billeting of the Troops – Mr. Bell
163 Carmichael, Jas. Claim against Thos. Sheridan Pensioner.
1014 Commissary Genl. Contracts for fuel and candles for Barracks
199 Cunningham, John. Enlisted and discharged without paying the smart money
200 Cope, Mrs. Marriage Certificate.
202 Chaloner, Rd. Conduct of Private Lavery, 28th Foot.
205 Caroll, Private ?Sth. Transportation of
206 Cooney, Michael Private. Transportation of
211 Cust, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
224 cain, Private ?Stm. Sentence of – Transportation
229 Circular respecting Forage Allowances
231 Connell, Mary – Application for her husbands pension &c.
2401 Cowan, Wm. Respecting the sale of his half pay.
254 Chartrs, Mrs. Marriage certificate of
256 Cavan Mila. Appointments of Majrs. Thompson & Waring in
260 Carey, Capn. Tyrone Mila – Retired Allowance of.
261 Campbell, Robert – Sentence of Transporting Against.
276 Circular respecting Chelsea pensioners to Magistrates at Petty Sessions
277 Circular Respecting Chelsea Pensioners to inspr. Gen. Of Police
281 Clare Militia – appointment of a successor to Col. Sir J. ?Birtan
292 Cormick, Pat. Claim against the Officers of the S. Mayo Mila.
293 Campbell, ?Ds. William – Hospital Asst. Question respecting
302 Connolly, Michl. Claim to the effects of Pat & Ml. Connolly
304 Clare Militia – Reps. Cane & Co. appointed Agents to
3001Cole, Edwd. Sentence of Transportation against.
310 Chadwick, Lieut Peter – sale of his Commission in the Tipperary Mila.
311 Clare Mila. Conduct of Lieutenant Hodges
318 Cavan Mila. Mr. Thos. Young appointed Ensign in
320 Chelsea Hospital, Conduct of Elliott a Pensioner
329 Carter, Revd. H., Claim for officiating for the Troops at Carrickfregus
334 Clare Mila. Poole Hickman appointed Capt vice Griffin
S.G. Purdon do Patterson
Augustine Buller do Blood
Michl Finnucane do martin
3401 cane, Rd. Accommodation for paying Chelsea pensioners
354 Cheshire, Private Thos. Enquiry respecting
356 Circular – Suspension of the operation of that part of the Royal Warrant dated 14th Novr granting under certain conditions the discharge of Soldiers to pension at their own request.
359 Circular respecting the conveyance of Soldiers and their families by coasting Steam or canal conveyance.
365 circular respecting the rates for Fuel, Candles, Straw and Wood for the Troops in Ireland.
367 Circular respecting the rates of Allowance to general and other Staff Officers of infantry Regts in lieu of Forage for horses required to be kept by them.

D

19 Dowans, Edwd. Enquiry respecting his Son 23rd Welsh Fusiliers
22 Donnolan, Patk. Alledged debt due by 2nd Master Cooper Clare Mila
59 Drought, G.E.A. Soliciting compensation as a retired Billet Master
70 Down South Mila. Accommodation for Staff of
013 Down South Mila. Agreement respecting said Accommodation
0101Duggan, Mr. King’s duty on cart horses sold by
95 Darnly, Earl of. Acknowledging Circular respecting billeting of Troops
97 Dillon, Captn. Expenses incurred by as a magistrate &c.
104 Dillon, captn. Robbery of a Gunpowder vender at Tullamore
1001 Dunne, Geo. 32nd Foot. Enquiry respecting
125 Doherty, John – Debt of Lt. Curey, Tyrone Mila
129 Down Mila South – Arms and Accoutrements of
1401 Dalzell (Darbyell?) Saml. Schoolmr. Serjt. (Informations against)
156 Durneen, Eleanor – Applying for the Admission of her children into the Hibernian School
160 Doyle, C. Claim against the 60th Regt.
176 Daunt, Mrs. Marriage certificate of
192 Down North Mila. Appointment of Mr. Knox as captain
193 Daunt, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
212 Duffy, Corporal – Attendance required at the Kilkenny Azzises
214 Darley, Ensign – Attendance required at the Kilkenny Azzises
221 Dublin Co. Militia – Baron de Robeck appointed Major of
2301 Dublin Co. Militia. Claim for the rent of the premises occupied by the Staff and Stores of
245 Dunphy, Edwd. Claim for acting as a Billet Master
247 Despard, Fras. Report on the conduct of the 28th Regt.
2501 Doherty, Sarah on behalf of her husband a soldier sentenced to be transported
261 Duggan Jeremiah Sentence of – Transportation against
Doherty, Dennis. Sentence of – Transportation against
280 Dempsey, Anne – Claim as a Relative of Miller, a Bandman
3001 Drake, John. Sentence of Transportation against
309 Down South Mila. E. Matthews appointed to Lt. Colonel
313 Dwyer, John. Claim as a Billet Master
316 Douglas, M. Genl. Sir. Jas. Placed on the Staff of Ireland.

E

33. Earl Robt, Wexford, Mila praying for a Pension
105. Early, John Enquiry respecting a balance due to his son a soldier.
10101 Eightieth Foot. Mssrs Cane & Co., appointed Agents to.
215Eighty First Foot or Eighty fourth Foot to be embarked from Liverpool to Dublin
246. Eighty First Foot. Mssrs. Armit & Co, appointed Agents to.
296. East India Co. Service – Question as to Pensions of the
320. Elliot, Robt., Pensioner. Refusal to take the oath of Allegiance.

F

16 52nd Foot. Mssrs. Cane & Co., appointed Agents to.
28. 47th Foot. Disembarkation of
39.Forbes, Visct. Report respecting an attempt to rescue a Deserter.
40.FitzHarris, Thos. Application for Geo. Jephson’s discharge from the Army.
55. 43rd Foot. Mssrs. Armit & Borough appointed Agents to.
56. 47th Foot. Mssrs. Armit & Borough appointed Agents to.
67. 47th. Major Sadleir – Transmissoin of Routes & Returns.
131. 4th Dragoon Guards. Mssrs. Cane & Co. Appointed Agents to.
146. Finlay Private, 6th Dr. Guards. Maintenance of a Child sworn to.
164. Ford, Peter. Enquiry respecting his marriage.
1015. Fintown. Misconduct of the Innkeeper at in refusing to accommodate a Military Escort.
215. 14th Foot. To be embarked from Portsmouth to Cork.
250 14th Foot. Mssrs. Armit & Borough & Co., appointed Agents to.
251. Floyd, Edwd., Soliciting a Pension as a retired Corporal of Militia.
261. Filly, Denis alias Bourke alias O’Donnell sentence of transportation against.
266. Fannon, John. Claim to Pension negatived.
281. Fitzgerald & Vesey, Lord. Vacant Colonelcy of Clare Militia
291. Feeney, John. Petition of the Widow of.
296. Fenton, J. Conduct of Pensioners of the East India Co. Service.
341. Forster, Major Wm. F. appointed as Asst. Adjt. Genl. Vice Harris.
344. Fannon, John. Col. Lindsay’s Certificate returned to
364. Fraser Mrs. Marriage Certificate of.

G

115. Gray, Saml., not considered eligible to a Yeomanry Commissoin
014. Gormley Revd., Mr. P.P. Claim for officiating in the Genl. Mily. Hospital
102. Griffith, Hugh. Private 66th Foot, application for relief.
161. Griffin, – convicted for having Fire Arms contrary to Law
161 also Gillespie, Joshua, recommending the disposal of said arms
167. Giddins, Thos. Applying for a Pension from the Chelsea Hospital
1016. General Order for granting Mily aid to Civil Power &C.
194. Griersan, Mssrs. Bill for ?Mutiny Acts &C.
196. Griffin, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
257. Goodwin, Mrs. Rebecca – Claim to the Pension of
263. Galligan, Bridget. Enquiry as to her marriage.
279. Gore, Patk., late Pensioner – respecting his pension.
2016. Good, S. Pensioner – Conduct of.
289. Granard – Conduct of the Chief Constable at – Escape of a Deserter.
323. Gibson, Revd. A., Claim for officiating for the Military.
331. Galway Mila. Mr. C. Le Poer French appointed Captain in.
353. Gordin, Henry, Respecting Corpl. H. Gordins’ effects.

H

23. Hanbury, SSm. Compensation as Billet Master in town of Galway
24 Hewt Corpl. 60th Foot. Enquiry respecting distribution of his effects
66. Hazlewood Geo.Soliciting compensation as a Militia Officer.
69 Hibernian School Excuse for Sir. Sm. Gossets non-attendance as a Governor of.
015 or 615. Hervey, Lt. 66th Foot, Claim for his Widow to a Pension
103. Heany, Robt. Claim for Rent due by a Pensioner
117. Heffernan Park. Claim for car hire for Provisions for 9th Foot.
152. Heyburn, John. Enquiry thro’ Recruiting Dept respecting.
153 Hemly, Captain. – Claim for expenses incurred as Magistrate.
165 Harvey, Lady. Case of as Washerwoman of the Royal Hospital
Hibernian School – Mr. Rays’ bequest to See. 110
1701. Hungate SSm. Enquiry respecting his being a Coll. In the Army.
1013 Hogan, Private, Henry – Confined for debt. – Liberated.
197. Hill – Jas. Claim as Billet Master of Kildare
206. Hawkins, John SSm. Private. Transportation of.
2001 Hall, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of.
222 Hughes John – Marriage of with Judith Robinson not considered legal.
225 Hales, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of.
264. Hart, Hugh – Certificate of his services required.
265 Hunt, Mrs. Marriage certificate of.
290 Hynes, Michael – Claim to pension
311 Hodges lieut. Ssm. Conduct of.
341 Harris Lt. Col. Asst. Adj. Genl. Succeeded by Major Forster
342 Hawkins SSm Trial before a Court Martial
343. Hizzard, Private Thos. Applicatino on behalf f the Son of.
350 Hare, Lt. Col. Military party required for the protection of Coroner & c.

I-J

40. Jephson , Geo. Requesting an application for his discharge from the army
73 Joyce, David – claim to property left by 2nd Master Lynch
169. Johnston, Alexr Meml to be restored to the ensoins List
203 Irwin Mrs. Marriage certificate of
216. Johnston, Private John. Attendance required at Clonmel Assizes
223 Jones Rees B? Laudable conduct in billeting troops &C.
273. Jordan, Wm. Claim for arrears of pay & Clothing
2015 Jones, Private J. Case of pistols sold by
322 Irvine, Jas. Requesting the half pay of the late Ensign Frederick
355 Johnstone, Mrs. Marriage certificate of.

K

7 Kerry Militia – Augmentation Major Crosbie proposed to fill vacant Majority
31 Kemmis ?Mssrs. Report respecting debt of J.L. right
72 Keehan, Ml. Petition to be restored to the Penson List
107 Kelly Thos. Late of 15 Foot. Enquiry respecting his Effects.
1101. Keown, Fids. Claim against John Lappan 64th Foot
147 Kinnegad – Refusal of the Parish to nominate a Billet Master at.
155. Kelly Troop 2nd Mr. 4th Dr. Guards – statements of his services required
190 Kenna Thos. Out Pensioner of the Queens Co. Militia – Complaint of.
206 Kitson, George Private, Transportation of
214 Kay, Robert Sergt Major. Attendance required at Kilkenny Assizes.
220 Kelly, Mrs. Marriage certificate of.

L

14 Leslie, Major Cong. Bl. Rifles, requesting permission to parade in Lower Castle Yard
34 Lally, Edwd. 10th Foot. Sentence to Transportation
35 Lee, SSm 28th Foot. Sentence to Transportation
47 Leitrim Militia. Lodgement in Ordnance Stores of the spare arms of
74 Leitrim Militia. Escort for Swords to be returned into Store
701 Londonderry Militia. Imprisonment of a Drummer for debt.
017 Leitrim Militia, Charges against Adjutant Cox
90 Londonderry Militia, Liability of House hired for, to taxation
96. Larkin, Pat. Complaining of a Canteen for the Militia at Oughterard
110 Lappan, John 64th Foot, Claim of Fras. Keown against
122 Lamb, Rose. Praying for a passage to her husband serving in 75th Foot.
134 Lalor, Pat. 52nd Foot. Conduct of
202 Lavery, Wm. Private 28th Foot. Assault on a Police Constable
253 Lindesay, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
284 Leitrim Militia. Claim of Serjt. Rutherford
286 Lorinan, N or M. Conduct of Good a Pensioner
301 Liddy, Patk. Claim to the effects of ?Timy Liddy, East India Co.
3001 Leitch, SSm. Sentence of Transportation against.
317. Lloyd, Mrs. Marriage certificate of.

M

4 Murray, Revd. ?Wm. Additional Allowance granted to
5 MacLean Major Genl. To succeed M. Genl. Smith Bl. Artillery
11. McClintock, Lieut. Repost respecting debt alledged to be due by him
26 Mily Secy. Mily party required to attend a public whipping at Galway
44 McDonald, Bernard, respecting prize money due to his brother
46 M. Genl. MacLean recommended for vacancy at the Board of the Royal Hospital
48 Murray Michl. Memorial to be restored to his Situation in the Engineers Dept.
52 Monaghan Milia. Col. Madden to be Col. Commandant
57 Military promotions and appointments in Ireland since 3rd Jany 832
501 Military promotions and appointments since 24th Janey 1832
60 McCartie, Mr. Charge against respecting Mila Compensation
61 Moffit, John. A minor discharged from 84th Regt.
Mily Secy. Report from on the abovementioned subject (discharge of Moffit, John)
62 Mily Promotions and Appointments in Ireland since 13th Feby 1832
64 Mahan Margt. Claim on the Forage Contractor to the Troops at Athlone
65 McDonald B. Prize Money
601 Monaghan Milia. Accomodation for Staff
96 Mily Secy. Report respecting a canteen car at Oughterard
100 Molloy, ?Arthur, not entitled to a pension
106. McMahon, John. Enquiry respecting Captain Cradock
111 McDermott, Geo. Late Pensioner 1st Foot, applying for relief etc.
112 McCraith, Patk respecting an annuity granted on account of his mother
126 Mily Secy. Illegal marriages of Soldiers of 92nd Foot (See 143)
1201 Mily Secy. Subsistence &c. of Soldiers wives & Children attacked with Cholera
130 Mily Secy Discontinuance on the Staff of Lieutenant Cols. Vincent & Beresford
137 Mily Secy. Order for burning the clothing of Soliers dying of the Cholera
138 Mily Secy. Transmitting Reports from Major Menzies 68th Foot to Capt Dillon64th
141 Mily Secy . Inconvenience attending the billeting of 4th Dr. Gds. At Newry
142 Moore, Hugh. Requesting Act for guidance of Billet masters
143 Mily Secy. Prosecution of Mr. Allen for illegally marrying soldiers
145 Mily Secy Transmitting reports from Major Madden & Capt Des Veux 50th Regt.
149 Mily Secy. Accommodation of Soldiers wives and Children attacked with Choler
150 Mily Secy. Removal of Military from the Penitentiary at Cork.
1501 Mily Secy Respecting the circulation of the General Orders for aiding the Civil Power
170 Madden, Private, Jas. Rate of Pension
174 Martin, rs. Marriage Certificate of
179 Military Acts, Circulation of
1010 McClerahan, Jas. Acts respecting Billet Markers required
1015 Mily Secy. Misconduct of an Innkeeper at Finntown
186. Mily Secy. Genl Order for granting Mily aid to the Civil Power & c.
195 Montgomerie, Mrs. Marriage certificate of
199 Miott (??), Jas. Discharge of a recruit enlisted by him without paying the smart money.
206 Martin, Jas alias SSm Thompson, Private. Transportation of
216 Moody, David & Peter. Attendance required at Clonmel Azzizes.
240 Mance, Thos. Transported for Desertion
242 McGee, Patkk. Complaint of a non-payment of his Pension
269. Mily Secy. Conduct of a Private of the 28th Foot at Callan
2701 McLeod, John Private, Transported
2013 McDuff, rs. Hannah. Supposed fraud in receiving her pension
280 Miller, Private 87th Foot. Claim of Anna Dempsey as a relative of.
289 Mily Secy. Conduct of the police Officers at Granard. Escape of a Deserter &c.
294 McDonald, Michael. Struck off the Pension List &c.
299 McGran, Jas. Praying to be placed on the Pension List.
303 McEllice, Private Chas. Attendance required at the Quarter Sessions
306 Mily Secy Attendance of Soldiers required at Clonmel
3001 Magennis, Patk. Sentenceof Transportation against.
309 Mathews, Echlin. Appointed Lt. Col. Of the Down Militia
312 McDermot, Fras. Enquiry respecting his service in the German Army
328 Meehan, John a Pensioner – Conduct of.
330 Mayo South Milia. Appointments of Mssrs. Orm & Palmer in
335 Mily Secy Grant of an additional allowance of 2 lbs of oats per ration to flases in billet?
337 McCoy SSm, Claim to Pension
Martin, SSm. Cliam to Pension.
339 Mily Secy. Transmitting letters from Major Parke & Capt O’Neill
340 Mily Secy Refusal of the Parish Priest of Boyle to officiate at the funeral of a Catholic Soldier of the 34th Foot.
342. Miller, Geo. Trial before a Court Martial
345 McGray, John – Claim to a Pension
349 Moore, Garret, acknowledging letter and sating that he has forwarded t to the ordnance Department
363 Mily Secy Hire of a magazine at Derry for the ammunition of 30th Regt.
366 Mottram, P.C. Enquiry respecting the Cheshire Militia
3601 Mathews, Private George – Application for his discharge.

N

31 Newport?Mssrs. Dividend on account of debt of T. L. Wright (see 89/33)
012 Needham, Henry. Enquiry from British War Office respecting
94 9th Foot not to be sent to Gibralter at present
107 Nowlan An. Effects of the late Thos. Kelly 15th Foot
159 New ?Ross, Sovereign of respecting the billeting of troops
215 90th Foot to b embarkd from Glasgow to Scotland
91st Foot To be embarqued from Liverpool to Dublin
232 Do Mssrs. Cane & Co. Appointed Agents to
274 Nowlan, Mrs. Marriage certificate of
3001 Noble John Sentence of Transportation against
360 Nester, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of

O

101 Ordnance – Cooking Material supplied to Guard Houses
20 Ordnance – Ammunition for Longford Militia Staff
63 O’Halloran, Lt. Marriage certificate of the Widow of
019 O’Brien Lieut., 2nd. Vr. Batt. Claim of his widow to pension
96 Oughterard, Complaint against a Canteen Car for the Military at
113 Ordnance – Reception into Store of the Arms and deposited in the gaol at Dundalk
124 Ordnance Issue of Pistols for persons employed at the Gaol at Maryboro’
132 Ordnance – Reception into the Store of the surplus arms &c of the South Down Mila
172 Ormond, Marquis of, appointed Aid de Camp to the King
205 Oakley, Private John, Transportation of
2101 O’Neill, John Late private 64th Foot, Claim of the Widow of
230 Ordnance – Bedding for the Provost prison Dublin
239 Owen, Mrs. Marriage Certificate of
366 Ordnance – Mr. Mothams ? enquiry respecting the Cheshire Mila was quartered in Richmond Barracks.

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Revenue Officers, 1709

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This is a list of people employed by the Irish Revenue Service in 1709. The surnames are for the most part English, those of Anglo-Irishmen. Some of these people would have been Englishmen who came to Ireland and settled down. Many will have been moved from one place of employment to another. This list simply shows the area in which they were employed on June 24th, 1709. Each name is found attached to a particular district, these districts may have covered more than one county. Districts may have had sub-groupings depending on the occupation of the person.

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