Category Archives: Wexford

Graveyards and Churches in Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use. The list is separated as follows:

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Other Churches, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

The placenames are listed alphabetically:

ACLAMON
OS 34: 16:5 ‘Church (Site of)’ Marked as ruined building and described ‘site of Church’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map but not visible then. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
29-7-1988

BALLYLANNAN
OS 40:16:4 ‘Church (Site of)’ O’Donovan recorded that E gable of church was standing. Slightly sunken area (dims. 10m N-S; 7m E-W) and some dressed stones mark church site. No evidence of enclosure or burial.
6-10-1988

BALLYMOTY MORE
OS 20:16:2 ‘Church (Site of)’ Marked ‘Church (Site of)’ on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps. No visible remains at ground level.
13-9-1987

BALLYNURE
OS 22:9:3 ‘Church (Site of)’ Marked as the site of a church on 1841 and 1922 OS 6-inch maps. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Holy well, a natural spring of which nothing is known, lies c. 100m to E
13-10-1987

BATTLESTOWN
OS 44: 12:3 ‘Templeboy (Site of)’ Marked ‘site of Templeboy’ within small faintly marked circular enclosure on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, burial or enclosure at ground level.
17-10-1988

CLONLEIGH
OS 30:3: 1 ‘Church (Site of)’ Rectangular structure (L c. 20m; Wth c. 8m) defined by low earthen bank survived in 1950s. Not visible at ground level.
1-7-1988

GARRAUN LOWER
OS 25:1:1 Church (site) Marked faintly as circular enclosure and described ‘site of chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Local information places site c. 300m to E. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Bullaun stone lost since 1940s.
17-8-1987

GLENGLASS
OS 18: 16:3 ‘Killeen (in ruins)’ Marked only on 1925 OS 6-inch map. O’Donovan records that small church once existed on site. Church site thought to be slightly raised area (dims. c. 10m NW-SE; c. 6m NE-SW). St Anne’s Well, now covered in, nearby.
30-7-1987

GRANGE LOWER
OS 18:15:3 ‘Church (Site of)’ Described ‘Church (site of)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burials at ground level.
18-8-1987

HOLMESTOWN LITTLE
OS 37:9:1 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Marked ‘Church (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Cairn material removed in 1980s leaving vegetation mark of rectangular enclosure (dims. 20m N-S; 15m E-W).
22-9-1988

KILBRIDE
OS 26:8:3 ‘Church (Site of)’ Marked ‘church (site of)’ on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
20-10-1987

KILCARBRY
OS 26:5:5 ‘Church (site of)’ Marked as site of church and holy well on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps. Not visible at ground level. Nineteenth-century granite doorway in nearby mill may have come from site. Site of well immediately adjacent.
3-10-1987

KILDERRY
OS 41:13:2 Church (site, tradition) Local tradition of the former existence of a church and well. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
9-9-1988

KILMACOT
OS 27: 12:2 ‘Church (site of)’ Marked ‘Church (site of)’ on 1841 and 1924 OS 6-inch maps. Raised rectangular stony area (dims. 17.5m NE-SW; 16.5m NW-SE; H 0.7-1.3m). No evidence of structure or burial.
22-10-1987

KNOCKBINE
OS 41:14:4 Church (tradition) Local tradition of the former existence of a church. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
3-12-1988

SHELBAGGAN
OS 45:1:4 ‘Church (Site of)’ Marked as rectangular building within small oval enclosure on 1841 OS 6-inch map and described ‘Church (in Ruins)’ . No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Bullaun stone on site. St Agatha’s Well c. 200m to SW.
26-10-1988

TEMPLENACROHA
OS 30:7:5 ‘Church (Site of)’ Marked’ Site of Church’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Small triangular area with no visible remains of any structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Millstone found on site.
27-6-1988

TEMPLESHELIN
OS 30: 12: 1 ‘Church (Site of)’ Church extant within small enclosure on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Site of Templeshelin Well nearby.
27-6-1988

TULLYCANNA
OS 41: 14:5 Church (tradition) Local tradition of former existence of a church. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
14-9-1988

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Children’s Burial Grounds, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

Some graveyards in the countryside have no evidence or record of an ecclesiastical origin, but as the Church controlled burial throughout the Middle Ages it is possible that they had a church at one time. Simple burial grounds could also have existed from the introduction of Christianity. In some parts of the country infants and the stillborn were buried in separate, unmarked graveyards, called ‘Killeens’. These are quite rare in Co. Wexford and are only known through local traditions.

BALLINDAGGAN
OS 14:10:2 ‘Grave Yard’ Graveyard Rectangular graveyard (dims. c. 80m E-W; c. 40m N-S) defined by a stone wall. Burial dates from c. 1720 and graveyard is probably just outside outer enclosure of the early monastic church of Templeshanbo
1-7-1987

BALLOWEN or RAMSFORTPARK
OS 7:9:4 Graveyard (site) Marked ‘site of graveyard’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map and local traditions of same. Not visible at ground level. St Michael’s Well, a natural spring, located c. 170m to S .
14-7-1987

BALLYCLEMOCK
OS 35:16:2 ‘Grave Yard’ Graveyard Marked on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps. Rectangular area (int. dims. 34m NW-SE; 31m NE-SW) defined by earthen bank. Graves date to nineteenth and twentieth century. Two stones with chamfer and rebate, possibly from the doorway of a church.
19-7-1988

BALLYMORRIS
OS 31:8:4 Children’s burial ground. Small cairn of stones including quartz stones (diam. 4m). Local tradition of use as children’s burial ground.
6-10-1987

BALLYREGAN
OS 16:10:4 Graveyard ( site) Marked as a small triangular graveyard only on 1840 OS 6-inch map. Not visible at ground level.
30-12-1990

BALLYROE (NUNN)
OS 27:14:5 Graveyard (site) Marked ‘Moneyboy burial ground’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map and visible in 1978 as a slightly raised trapezoidal area (dims. 24m E-W; 2-8m N-S) with no evidence of burial. Not now visible at ground level.
7-1-1988

BRIDESWELL BIG
OS 6:9:4 ‘Brideswell Burial Ground’ Graveyard Triangular graveyard defined by earth and stone bank with nineteenth-century gravestones. Brides Well, now covered, c. 300m to NW with remains of conjoined masonry circular huts (diam. 4.5m) adjacent. ‘St Brigid’s Track’, a stone basin (dims. 0.4m x 0.2-0.3m; H 0.15m) within one hut.
27-8-1988

CASTLETOWN
OS 3:16:4 Graveyard (site) Described as ‘site of Templesillagh’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Not visible at ground level.
8-7-1987

CLONOUGH
OS 3:11:5 Graveyard (site) Marked ‘site of graveyard’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map, the tradition still persists but there are no visible remains at ground level. St Michael’s Well, a natural spring, located c. 170m to S.
5-7-1987

DUNGULPH
OS 45:13:5 Graveyard (tradition) Slightly raised rectangular area (dims. 22m N-S; 17m E-W; H 0.3-0.6m) with tradition of use as a graveyard.
26-11-1988

GLENGLASS
OS 19:13:1 Graveyard (site) Marked faintly as ‘site of graveyard’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Not visible at ground level.
30-7-1987

GRANGE (Bannow ED)
OS 45:12:2 ‘Grave Yd. (disused)’ Graveyard Raised sub circular area (dims. 18m NW-SE; 16m NE-SW) defined by scarp (H 0.4-0.7m). No visible structure or burials at ground level.
26-11-1988

KILDALOO
OS 15:1:5 Children’s burial ground Small cairn of quartz stones (diam. 1.2m) on slight rise in ‘Relig field’. Strong local tradition about burial of infants.
21-7-1987

KILLYNANN
OS 7:9: 1 ‘Burial Ground (disused)’ Graveyard ( site) Land has been reclaimed and headstones buried. Bullaun stone recorded on 1940 OS 6-inch map but no trace of it now.
10-7-1987

KILPATRICK
OS 7:4:3 Graveyard (site) Marked as ‘site of graveyard’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Farmhouse now on site. Site of Toberpatrick Well c. l00m to S.
24-7-1987

KNOCKBRANDON UPPER
OS 6:5:6 ‘Kilcorkey Burial Ground (Disused)’ Graveyard Sub circular area defined by earthen bank with external stone cladding (dims. 40m E-W; 37m N-S). Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century graves. No indications of a church.
11-6-1987

NEWTOWN
OS 15:7:1 Children’s burial ground Local tradition of burial of infants on site. Not visible at ground level.
21-7-1987

TOBERANIERIN LOWER
OS 11:11:6 ‘Grave Yard’ Graveyard D-shaped graveyard (dims. 62m NE-SW; 45m NW-SE) defined by straight stone-clad earthen bank at roadside at NW and curved stone-clad earthen bank elsewhere. No knowledge of any church and no visible remains of such a structure at ground level.
30-11-1990

TOMBRICK
OS 14:4:2 ‘Crishoge (Infants’ Burial Ground)’ Children’s burial ground Triangular area in corer of field (dims. 25m N-S; 14m E-W) now planted with trees.
3-7-1987

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Post-Medieval Churches, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

The placenames are listed alphabetically:

ADAMSTOWN
OS 31:13:1 Church (site). Catholic church marked ‘R.C. Chapel’ on 1841 bS 6-inch map and depicted faintly as cross-shaped structure. No visible remains at ground level.Toberbaun or Tober Abban, still venerated, c. 400m to S.
30-9-1987

AUGHCLARE
OS 34:16:4 Church (site) Catholic church marked faintly and described as ‘Site of chapel’ on 1841 OS map. At bottom of steep slope and adjacent to wet land. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or buried at ground level.
29-7-1988

BALLYDOYLE
OS 47:11:3 ‘St Bridget’s Cath. Ch. (in Ruins)’ Catholic church marked ‘R.C. Chapel (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Foundations of rectangular structure (dims. 7.55m E-W; 5.25m N-S) with entrance (Wth 1.05m) at W. Within rectanglular enclosure (dims. 22m N-S; 21m E-W) defined by earthen bank (Wth c. 3m; inL H 0.5m; ext. H 0.8-1.4m). Possible entrances at W (Wth 1.2m) and S (Wth 1.85m). No indications of burial.
10-8-1988

BALLYHINE
OS 37:9:5 Church (site) Catholic church marked ‘site of R.C. Chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level~
12-8-1988

BALLYKELLY
OS 42:16:2 ‘RC Chapel (Disused)’ Catholic church built in 1797 and closed in 1858. Remains consist of foundations of rectangular structure (dims. 17.05m E-W; 6.96mN-S; H 1.2m) except N wall incorporated into handball alley. Rectangular granite font, originally from Kilmacree, within church. No evidence of enclosure or burial.
13-10-1988

BARMONEY
OS 31:15:4 ‘Church (Site on, Grave Yard’ Possible Catholic church marked ‘Church (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Slightly raised rectangular area (dims. 41m N-S; 20m E-W) defined by low earthen bank (Wth 4-6m; H 0.5m) at N and E and field fences at S and W. Entrance (Wth 3m) at E. Within are foundations of building with drystone walls of shale and quartz oriented E-W (int. dims. 11.35m E-W; 2.5m N-S). Second rectangular structure visible as sunken area (dims. 8.5m E-W; 5m N-S) within the enclosure. No evidence of burial. Church Well c. 30m to ESE.
29-9-1987

BELLGROVE
OS 46:7:2 Church (site) Catholic church marked ‘site of R.C. Chapel’ only on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.

BLACKHALL
OS 45:16:5 Church (site, tradition) Possible Catholic church marked ‘R.C. Chapel (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Foundation course of rectangular building (dims. 5.9m E-W; 4m N-S) believed locally to by church. No evidence of burial or enclosure. Lady’s Well c. 50m to S.
3-11-1988

BOOLNADRUM
OS 10:11:4 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Possible Catholic church. Remains of rectangular building with quartz stones oriented E- W (dims. 13.3m E-W; 7m N-S), within a slightly raised quadrilateral area defined by field fences at SW and NW and slight scarp at NE and SE (dims. 30m NW-SE; 25m NE-SW). No evidence of burial.
17-6-1987

BREE
OS 31:4:2 ‘School’ Church Catholic church. Described ‘Old R.C. Chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Rectangular building (int. dims. 19mE-W; 6m N-S), originally with four pointed windows on each long wall and entrance probably at W. Adapted as a school with central partition and two porches at S. Now used for storage.
29-9-1987

BURROW
OS 43:10:2 ‘Chapel (site of)’ Possible Catholic church, listed by Synnott in 1680. No trace of the church survived in earlier nineteenth century although local tradition believes it is incorporated into dwelling (dims. 11.2m E-W; 4.8m N-S). No evidence of enclosure or burial. St Broagh’s Well adjacent to S.
5-7-1988

CAIM
OS 19:14:3 Church (site) Catholic church described ‘site of R.C. Chapel’and depicted faintly as cross-shaped structure on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
30-7-1987

CLERISTOWN SOUTH
OS 41:16:6 Church (site) Catholic church marked ‘R.C. Chapel (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level.
13-9-1988

HOUSELAND
OS 49:16:3 Church ( site) Possible Catholic church marked ‘Site of R.C. Chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burials at ground level. Site of St Helen’s Well nearby.
18-10-1988

KILCLOGGAN
OS 49:8:5 ‘Parochial Hall’ Church Catholic church, now in ruins. T-shaped plan with main entrance at S to nave (int. dims. 13m x 6.4m) with stoups built into E and W walls and gallery overhead. Subsidiary entrances to E and Warms which lack galleries (int. dim. E-W 20.4m). Sacristy attached to N. All windows and doors round-headed and built in brick. Granite crosses surmount E and W gables. No evidence of enclosure or burial.
1-12-1990

KILLEGNEY
OS 24: 12:2 Church (site) Catholic church marked ‘Site of R.C. Chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Rectangular area (dims. 10.5m E-W; 5m N-S) partly dug into quarry face at W end with slight traces of wall foundation at N. No evidence of enclosure or burial at ground level.
26-8-1987

KILLOWEN
OS 11:3:5 Church Possible Catholic church. Foundations of rectangular building oriented WNW-ESE (L 12.2m; Wth 6m; H 1m). Walls contain quartz stones. No entrance visible. No evidence of an enclosure or burial but local tradition of a church.
24-6-1987

KILNEW
OS 27:8:2 Church (site) Possible Catholic church marked as ‘Chapel (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Two wells, Tobermogue and Toberrevagh, both natural springs are immediately adjacent.
18-10-1987

KILSCORAN
OS 48:6:6 Church (site) Catholic church marked ‘Site of R.C. Chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Oval area (dims. 25m N-S; 13m E-W) defined by field fence N-S and slight bank or scarp (H 0.3-1m) S-N. No evidence of structure or burial.
23-2-1988

LAKE
OS 47:10:4 ‘Church (Site of)’ Possible Catholic church marked only on 1940 OS 6-inch map. Slightly raised rectangular plat-form (dims. 9.7m E-W; 7.2m N-S; H 0.3m). No evidence of enclosure or burial. Site of St David’s Well c. 450m to N, immediately adjacent to site of castle.
5-8-1988

LONGRIDGE
OS 47:5:4 ‘Chapel & Burial Ground (site of)’ Possible Catholic church marked only on 1940 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. St Mochoaun’s Well located c. 350m to N.
8-8-1988

LOUGHNAGEER
OS 40:11:5 ‘St Catherine’s Chapel (Site of)’ Possible Catholic church. O’Donovan records tradition of church site dedicated to St Catherine. Triangular enclosure with no visible remains of structure or burial at ground level. St Catherine’s Well lies c. 450m to NE.
26-9-1988

OLDCOURT
OS 34:10:2 ‘Church (in Ruins)’ Catholic church still in use in 1837 (Lewis 1837, vol. 2,714). Marked ‘site of church’ and traced in outline on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Walls of rectangular building oriented E-W survive to H c. 0.8m (int. dims. 9.15m E-W; 4.20m N-S). No evidence of burial or enclosure. St Nicholas’ Well, a natural spring, lies c. 150m to E.
11-8-1988

PETITSTOWN
OS 47:7:3 ‘St Catherine’s Chapel (Site of)’ Catholic church listed by Synnott in 1680s and sited within a raised D-shaped area (dims. 43m E-W; 32m N-S) defined by a scarp and outer fosse which may have been a ringfort. Rectangular structure (dims. 6.2m E-W; 4.9m N-S) defined by low earthen bank and outer fosse. No evidence of burial. St Catherine’s Well c. 230m to SSE.
27-8-1988

RAMSGRANGE
OS 44:7:6 ‘Graveyard’ Catholic church, now removed without trace in a triangular graveyard. Depicted as a T-shaped chapel on in NLI, dated 1803. Two granite crosses with expanded ends, originally from the gables, are in graveyard.
1-12-1990

RATHMORE
OS 48:10:6 ‘Church (in Ruins)’ Catholic church listed in 1680 as a chapel dedicated to St George. Sub-rectangular area (dims. 29m E-W; 12m N-S) defined by straight field fence at W, curved field fence at N and low bank (Wth 1-2m; H 0.3-0.5m) at S. Within are foundations of rectangular structure (dims. 9m E-W; 4m N-S). No indication of burial.
29-6-1988

TOMHAGGARD
OS 47:15:6 ‘Mass House (Disused)’ Mass house Not listed in survey of Catholic priests in 1731 and not marked on 1841 OS 6-inch map although Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 637) mentions a chapel. Stone-walled thatched structure (dims. 7.1m x 5.5m) built against inner face of tower house probably at first-floor level and incorporating window embrasure as altar shelf. No evidence of enclosure or burial. St James’ Well and St Anne’s Well nearby.
10-8-1988

TRIMMER
OS 48:5:5 Church (site) Catholic church. Synnott, writing c. 1680 lists church dedicated to Bridget at Trimmer. Marked ‘site of RC Chapel’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. Site of St Bridget’s Well, where patterns were held on 2nd February lies c. 100m to NW of church site.
30-6-1988

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Estate Churches, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

The placenames are listed alphabetically:

BALLYCONOR BIG
OS 48:11:1 Church (possible) Estate church. Synnott writing c. 1680 lists a ruined chapel dedicated to St Nicholas at Ballyconnor. Outhouse attached to tower house may be chapel. Rectangular building (dims. 9.9m E-W; 5.45m N-S) with conglomerate quoins, now roofed with corrugated iron has round-headed door of dressed granite with hanging-eye in S wall. No evidence of enclosure or burial.
7-9-1988

CASTLETOWN
OS 53:7:4 Church Estate chapel of Castletown tower house 100m to NW. Synnott writing c. 1680 lists chapel and site marked ‘Chapel in Ruins’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Rectangular structure (dims. 8:5m E-W; 4.5m N-S; H c. 1.2m). No distinguishing features. No evidence of enclosure or burial.
28-1-1989

CULLENSTOWN
OS 46:13:2 ‘Graveyard (Disused)’ Church (site) Estate chapel of Cullenstown tower house, which lies 200m to W. Described as ‘R.C. chapel (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Foundations of rectangular structure (dims. 7.85m E-W; 4.2m N-S). Within rectangular enclosure (ext. dims. 35.5m N-S; 19m E-W) defined by low bank or remains of wall (Wth 2.5m; H 0.4m). Only one headstone visible.
20-9-1988

KILLIANE
OS 43:9:1 Church Estate chapel of Killiane. Rectangular structure (dims. 7.55m E-W; 5.5m N-S) with E and W walls surviving to H of 3m, N wall H 1m and S wall a collapsed pile of rubble (H 0.6m). Round-arched W doorway of uncut stone and rectangular E window of dressed limestone. No enclosure or evidence of burial. Site of St Helen’s Well c. 60m to W and Killiane Castle c. 100m to W.
28-11-1988

MOUNTPLEASANT or TAGUNNAN
OS 47:3:5 ‘Catholic Church (in ruins)’ Estate church listed by Synnott in 1680s. Parts of N wall (L 5.35m; H 2.5m) and E wall (L 4.5m; H 3.5m) survive with a rectangular window in E gable. No evidence of burial apart from brick vault within church. Within a rectangular enclosure (dims. 70m N-S; 55m E-W) defined by low bank (Wth 6.5-8.5m; H c. 0.5m) and shallow outer fosse (Wth 8-9m) on S, E and N sides with an irregular scarp at W. Small annexe (dims. 43m E-W; c. 20m N-S) defined by fosse, attached to N. Possible moated site adjacent to W.
27-8-1988

MULRANKIN
OS 47: 10:2 ‘Church (Site of)’ Possible estate church of Mulrankin tower house, 270m to S. Marked only on 1940 OS 6~inch map. No visible remains of structure, enclosure or burial at ground level. St Bridget’s Well c. 150m to S.
24-8-1988

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Medieval Monastic Remains, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

The placenames are listed alphabetically:

ABBEYDOWN
OS 4:7:6 ‘Abbey (site of)’ An abbey of the Augustinian Canons Regular existed here at the Suppression in the sixteenth century. No traces of any buildings exist today. Head of ogee-headed window, said to be from the site, now at the County Museum, Enniscorthy.
1-6-1987

BALLYLANE EAST
OS 34:8:4 ‘Abbey (Site of)’ Marked ‘Abbey (site of)’ with outline of small building on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible remains at ground level but local knowledge of walls encountered in drainage works c. 1950.
9-8-1988

CLONAMONA UPPER
OS 6: 10:4 ‘Monastery (site of)’ Marked only on 1940 OS 6-inch map. Not visible at ground level apart from some mounds of stone. Well with drystone-walling on site.
9-6-1987

COOLGREANY DEMESNE
OS 3:6:2 ‘Friary (Site of)’ FMarked ‘Friary (Site of)’ on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps. Origin of tradition probably Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 15). Not visible at ground level. Stone mortar from site at nearby house.
8-7-1987

DEERPARK
OS 6:1:3 ‘Monastery (Site of)’ Marked only on 1940 OS 6-inch map. There is no information regarding the history or nature of the site. Area has been reclaimed. Not visible at ground level.
8-6-1987

DUNBRODY
OS 39:10:5 ‘Dunbrody Abbey (in ruins)’ Abbey Granted to Cistercians of Buildwas in 1171-5 by Harvey De Montmorency, it was transferred to St Mary’s in Dublin in 1182. Church of nave and aisles, chancel and transepts survives complete except S arcade of nave and S aisle reduced to foundations. Each transept has three groin-vaulted chapels on E side. Night stairs leads from S transept to dormitories which do not survive. Fragmentary remains of chapterhouse and parlour in E range. Refectory walls surviving almost to full height with remains of reader’s lectern in S range and porter’s lodge on the W side surround the cloister, the arcade of which does not survive. Fortified with tower of two storeys and parapet over transept in fifteenth century which involved strengthening the transept piers. Monastery suppressed in 1536 and granted to Sir Osborne Etchingham in 1545, who built a dwelling of two storeys and attic over chapels of S transept. House has numerous square-headed windows in limestone.
5-9-1988

GLASCARRIG NORTH
OS 17:11:2 ‘Glasscarrig Priory, (in ruins)’ Monks of the Order of Tiron founded St Mary’s Priory which in 1193 was made a dependency by the Cantetans or Condons of the daughterhouse of St Dogmells’ in Pembrokeshire. It held many lands and benefices in Wexford and Carlow. Suppressed in 1543. In 1560 remains included a cell, church, hall, two rooms, chantry and small yard. One wall (L 12.7m) with no distinguishing features remains. Lady’s Well or Tobermurry, a rectangular well (dims. 2.5m x 3m) with concrete surrounds, lies c. 160m to SW.
23-7-1987

GREATISLAND
OS 39:9:5 ‘Leper Hospital (site of)’ Leper hospital (site, tradition) Known only from OS 6-inch map. No historical references or local traditions. Shaw-Mason records that a large collection of human bones was found at Greatisland,perhaps at this location. Burial of two adults in a stone compartment investigated by M. Cahill in 1979 close to site. Within possible ringwork.
31-8-1988

HORETOWN NORTH/HORETOWNSOUTH
OS 41 Priory (Site) St Mary’s Carmelite Priory founded in the fourteenth century by the Furlongs. Site was derelict at the Suppression when no description given. Location unknown but O’Donovan says it was at S of townland. Stones used to build Horetown church which may be on site.
14-9-1988

KILBRANEY
OS 40:2:5 ‘Abbey (Site of)’ Called ‘Abbeybraney’ and known only from OS 6-inch maps of 1841 and 1925. Thought to have been a house of Franciscan Third Order in fifteenth century. Site located by Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 364). Not visible at ground level.
15-9-1988

MONATURE
OS 3:10:3 ‘Site of Augustinian Friary’ Marked ‘site of Augustinian Friary’ on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps. Origin of tradition probably Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 15). Not visible at ground level.
2-7-1987

ST JOHN’S
OS 26:1:5 ‘St. John’s House’ Monastery of the Order of St Victor founded by Gerald de Prendergast in 1230 and subsequently attached to St Thomas’ in Dublin at which time it became Augustinian. Not visible at ground level. (Lewis 1837, vol. 1, 604
4-10-1987

TINTERN
OS 45:10:1 ‘Abbey (in ruins)’ Cistercian abbey founded in 1200 by William Marshal as a daughterhouse of Tintem in Wales. Nave and chancel with groin-vaulted chapel to E of destroyed S transept, probably built c. 1300. Nave has W entrance and three pointed arches to possible N and S aisles which together with N transept may have never been built. Chancel has large E window from which the tracery has been removed, and has external corbel table with decorated corbels. Three windows in N and S walls altered in seventeenth century. Unvaulted crossing with two storeys over is reached by spiral stairs attached to NW pier.

Granted to Anthony Colclough in 1560s who fortified the chancel crossing into a four-storeyed tower house. The chancel was transformed into a three-storeyed house with elliptical-headed windows and two storeys built over vaulted chapel. In the early eighteenth century the nave was transformed into a dwelling. Excavations in 1982-3 by A. Lynch revealed foundations of E wall of cloister arcade and drain beneath S end of E range. Gatehouse, altered to stables, survives on W side of cloister.
5-2-1989

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Early Ecclesiastical Remains, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

The placenames are listed alphabetically:

ASKINVILLAR UPPER
OS 18:4:1 ‘Kildoran Grave Yard, Church (site of). Church (site) Early ecclesiastical site. Possible bullaun stone, fragment of church wall and nearby St Doran’s Well recorded from here, but none of these features survive. Traces of a circular enclosure (diam. c. 70m) visible as band of subsoil when ploughed. Granite cross (H 0.76m) with incised cross and another granite cross (H 0.7m) with raised boss and elaborately incised cross within small graveyard.
22-7-1987

BALLYBRAZIL
OS 39:3:4 ‘Grave Yard’ Church ( site) Probably of early ecclesiastical origin.Grass-covered foundations of nave (dims. 14m E-W; 7m N-S) and chancel (dims. 5m E-W; 4m N-S) within rectangular graveyard defined by stone-clad earthen bank. Graveyard within large enclosure (dims. 94m E-W; 86m N-S) defined by slight traces of fosse (Wth c. 13m) NNW-N-E and scarp SE-SW. Site of Crone Well just outside enclosure at SW.
5-9-1988

BALLYLUSK
OS 2: 15:4 Church (site) Early ecclesiastical site called ‘Kilbride’. Oval area (dims. 80m N-S; 62m E-W) defined by scarp N-SW and by remains of bank (Wth 5.5m; H 0.4m) with external fosse (Wth 5m; D 0.3m) SW-NW. Cairn of stones marks site of church but no evidence of burial.
10-11-1987

BALLYORLEY UPPER
OS 21:1:2 Church (site) Early ecclesiastical site. Grass-covered remains of building with four cells oriented E- W (dims. 16.5m E-W; 9m N-S) probably recent and secular. Entrance (Wth Im) at N. Bank immediately adjacent on W side. Within a large circular enclosure ( diam. 90m) defined by scarp at Wand E and traces of fosse (Wth Ilm; D 0.4m) and external bank (Wth 5m; H 0.4m) at SW and N. Enclosure truncated at S by field fence. No evidence of burial. Adjacent to ringwork castle. Cross removed from site. Wall of a house (L 10m; H c. 5m) with doorway, two small windows and string course, possibly seventeenth-century in date, adjacent to site.
20-8-1987

BEGGERIN ISLAND
OS 38:2:4 ‘Church (in Ruins)’ Church Early ecclesiastical site within oval graveyard. Founded by Bishop Ibar in the fifth century. Two crosses with unpierced rings now in NMI and County Museum, Enniscorthy. Granite slab with incised cross still on site. Nave and chancel church (max. L 13.85m; W 6.7m) surviving to H of c. 3m except chancel which is almost completely destroyed. Entrance in W gable and single undecorated light in S wall of nave. Evidence of seventeenth-century pilgrimage
2-11-1987

BOLA BEG
OS 14:10:2 ‘Church (site of), Grave Yard’ Church Early monastic site probably founded by a St Colman in the seventh century and Romanesque parish church of Templeshanbo within oval graveyard. Portion of W wall survives (L 4.15m; H 1.4m). Originally doorway had batter and round head. Bullaun stone in doorway. St Colman’s Well, a rectangular drystone structure approached by stone steps, lies c. 150m to SE. Bullaun stone from wel), now missing. Graveyard with Church of Ireland church surrounded by double-ditched enclosure (max. ext. diam. c. 250m) visible as crop marks on aerial photographs (MM (2) 16-25).
Ballindaggan graveyard just outside S perimeter of enclosure.
1-7-1987

BULGAN .
OS 36:4:3 ‘Killell Church (site of)’ Church ( site) Early ecclesiastical origin. Marked faintly and described ‘site of Killell Church and Grave Yard’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Roughly circular clearing in forest (diam. c. 40m) defined by scarp N-SE and traces of fosse (Wth 2.7m; D 0.4m) NW-N. Cairn material in centre but no evidence of burial. Small cross-inscribed slab found on site.
6-10-1988

GREATISLAND
OS 39:5:6 ‘Kilmokea Church (site of)’ Church ( site) Early ecclesiastical site and parish church of Kilmokea. Small graveyard with Early Christian cross, circular font of conglomerate and granite cross-base. Within large enclosure (dims. c. 330m N-S; c. 260m E-W) defined by earthen bank best preserved SW-W (Wth 7m; ext. and int. H 2m) with outer fosse SW-W (Wth 10m; D 1.5m). Two bullaun stones associated with enclosure. Horizontal mill ( 400) found within enclosure; and earthwork site immediately outside at NE.
25-8-1988

HOOKS
OS 46: 12:6 ‘Church (in ruins), GraveYard’ Church Early ecclesiastical site and parish church of Kilcowan. Rectangular structure defined by grass-covered wall foundations (dims. at least 18m E-W; 6.8m N-S). Only W wall and adjacent S wall with door survive to H of 2.3m. Bullaun stone outside NW corner. Within subrectangular graveyard which itself occupies NE quadrant of larger enclosure (diam. 136m E-W) defined by field fences and graveyard wall W-N-SE and cropmark SE-W, visible on aerial photographs Motte built on W boundary of enclosure.
4-10-1988

KILCANNON
OS 20: 10:2 ‘Church (Site of)’ Church ( site) Possibly of early origin. Rubble-strewn area with foundations of some walls visible (dims. 17m E-W; 14m N-S). Arc of enclosure survives as scarp NNE-ESE (C 78m). No evidence of burial. Holy well c. 30m SW of church.
21-9-1987

KILLABEG
OS 20:2:6 ‘Church (site of), Burial Ground (disused)’ Church (site) Possible early ecclesiastical site. Remains of church appear as grass-covered walls (dims. 15m E-W; 6m N-S). Bank of circular enclosure (Wth 6-8m; H O.3m) survives SW-N-E (diam. 83m) but no evidence of burial.
15-9-1987

KILLANN
OS 18:12:2 ‘St. Anne’s Bur. Gd’ Church (site) Early ecclestiastical origin and parish church of Killann. Old church pulled down c. 1835 (O’Flanagan 1933, vol. 2, 102) and no traces visible. Outside subrectangular graveyard traces of enclosure remain NE-S-NW, defined by scarp (diam. c. 120m). St Anne’s Well whose pattern was held on 26th July until 1824 and which is still venerated, lies c.140m to S of graveyard.
17-7-1987

MORRISSYSLAND
OS 29:11:5 ‘St Stephen’s Chapel (site of)’ Church ( site) Early ecclesiastical in origin, it may be the site of St Abban’s monastery One length of wall oriented N-S (L 5.8m) is all that remains. Two bullaun stones on site. Within a large sub circular graveyard (dims. c. 155m E-W; c. 140m N-S). Site of St Stephen’s Well at SE corner of enclosure.
16-6-1988

PORTERSGATE
OS 54:4:2 (830,600) ‘Brecaun Church (in ruins)’ Church Early ecclesiastical origin. Parts of W gable (L 4.55m) with segmental-arched doorway and N wall (L 9.lm) survive. Fragments of an ogham inscription found in 1845 and c. 1930. Excavation by T. Breen found the final missing piece of ogham stone and also revealed that present structure was built on foundations of older church. No burials associated but evidence of enclosing ditch feature confirmed.
17-10-1988

ST VOGUE’S
OS 53:11:2 ‘St. Vogue’s Chapel (in ruins)’ Church Early ecclesiastical site. St Vogue or St Beac is thought to be a saint of the sixth century with Breton and Irish connections. Rectangular structure oriented ENE-WSW (dims. 9.38m E-W; 4.9m N-S) with walls surviving to H of c. 1.4m and a complete E gable (H 3.6m). Entrance (Wth 0.7m) towards Wend of N wall. Narrow round-headed E window and niche at N side of E wall, with small window at E end of S wall. Altar against E wall. Within sub circular enclosure (dims. 48m NE-SW; 42m NW-SE) curtailed by old farm buildings at SE and defined by earthen bank (Wth 2.5-3.5m; int. H 0.8-1.2m). Church repointed in 1940s and excavated in 1975 by M.J. O’Kelly et al. (1975), who discovered three phases of activity. The first included remains of a small wooden oratory ( dims. 2.25m x 1.5m) and hut site contemporary with the bank which was accompanied by a shallow outer fosse. The second phase involved the building of the present church and a rectangular building in the SE quadrant. Pottery from this phase suggests at the earliest a seventeenth-century date, although material may relate to the abandonment of the site. The third phase related to the post-medieval use of the enclosure for burial. Site of St Vogue’s Well, where patterns were held on 20th January lies c. 120m to E. St Vogue’s stone with T-shaped cross inscribed on it lies on the foreshore.
15-7-1988

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Medieval Churches, Co. Wexford

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The following list is from the ‘Archaeological Survey of County Wexford’. It should be of use to any genealogical researcher regardless of whether or not they ever visit Ireland in that it names those churches which are considered to be or have been parish churches for an area giving the townland that the church was located it. It also gives some indication of whether or not there was a graveyard associated with the church, as well as graveyards that were not located in the grounds of a church. Plus, it gives us some idea of the period churches were in use.

The placenames are listed alphabetically:

ADAMSTOWN
OS 31:13:2 ‘Adamstown Church (site of)’ Church (site) Parish church of Adamstown within oval graveyard on the site of an early church. Marked ‘Adamstown Church (Site of)’ on 1841 and 1925 OS 6-inch maps. Not visible at ground level. Decorated Romanesque fragment recorded from site. St Abban’s cross, a Latin cross in green stone (H c. 3.75m) in graveyard. St Abban’s Well is c. 1 km to S.
30-9-1987

AMBROSETOWN
OS 46:6:3 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Ambrosetown within a sub circular stone-walled graveyard. Undivided nave and chancel of which only the E gable with lancet window and glazing bars survive together with grass-covered foundations of N and S walls (dims. at least 17.6m E-W; 6.9m N-S). Rectangular granite font within church. Site of St Ambrose’s Well, where patterns were one time held c. 30m to N.
23-9-1988

ARDCANDRISK
OS 37:10:2 (321,276) ‘Castle (in ruins)’ Church Parish church of Ardcandrisk within subrectangular graveyard, misinterpreted as castle on current OS 6-inch map. Base of nave walls (int. L at least 9.95m; int. Wth 4.6m; H c. Im) with entrance (Wth Im) at S. Chancel rebuilt (int. L 5.2m; int. Wth 4m; H 2m) perhaps as mortuary chapel with entrance from nave (Wth Im) to S of centre. Rectangular font of conglomerate stone in nave. St Eusebius’ Well, a drystone-walled and slab-built well, at which patterns
were held until c. 1800 lies c. loom to N. Mound site (58) c. 50m to S.
22-9-1988

ARDCAVAN
OS 38:5:4 ‘Ardcavan Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’ Church ( site) Parish church of Ardcavan within oval graveyard (dims. 53m E-W; 18-30m N-S). Reputedly founded by St Caemon in the seventh century AD. One fragment of mortared masonry wall survives. Rectangular font in graveyard. Site of St Cavan’s Well, at which the pattern was held on 12th June until 1800 lies c. 200m to N.
2-11-1987

ARDCOLM
OS 38:1:5 (96,507) ‘St Columb’s Ch. (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Ardcolm within circular graveyard. Nave (int. dims. lorn E-W; 6.45m N-S) and chancel (int. dims. 6.75m E-W; 5.40m N-S) church with walls of mortared shale, quartz and conglomerate surviving to H of c. 3m. Entrance originally in W gable, now destroyed. Single undecorated lights survive in N wall of nave and of chancel. Pointed chancel arch (Wth 2.4m) of uncut stone; chancel not bonded to nave. St Columb’s Well, a natural spring at which the pattern was held on 9th June lies c. 150m to SE.
2-11-1988

ARDENAGH LITTLE
OS 41:6:4 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Church Sections of N and S walls (max. L 5m; max. H 1.2m) 6.1m apart and faint traces of other walls to E (total L 10.5m). No evidence of burial or enclosure. Site of Tobershidaun c. 280m to N.
8-9-1988

ARTRAMON
OS 37:4: 1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Artramon within rectangular graveyard. Nave and chancel church of which only the chancel (int. L 6.9m; int. Wth 4.25m) can be traced as wall foundations, except N wall (H c. 5m) which has two small lights placed high in the wall and adjacent part of E wall with two niches. St Bridget’s Well, an oval drystone-walled well, still venerated, lies c. 120m to S and tower house is nearby.
7-9-1988

BALLINCLARE
OS 11:10:5 ‘Toome Church (in ruins),Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Toome within rectangular graveyard. Nave and chancel church of which only the W, N and E walls of nave survive to roof level (int. L 11.3m; int, Wth 5.1m). Pointed chancel arch (Wth 1.8m) at E of nave. Chancel appears as sunken area (int. L 8.50m; int, Wth 5m). Bullaun stone outside SW corner of nave.
23-6-1987

BALLINGLY
OS 40:16:3 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Church Parish church of Ballingly within rectangular enclosure (dims. 45m E-W; 40m N-S) defined by field fences on all sides except N where there is a scarp. Rectangular structure oriented E-W (int. dims. 16.9m E-W; 5.75m N-S). W gable with double bellcote and lancet window survives intact. N wall with round-headed door in green stone towards Wend survives with breaks to roof level (H 3m). Other walls c. 1.5m high. Blocked door in S wall, opposite that in N, with holy water stoop bearing carved face. Altar at E end. Base of finial cross and piscina fragment in church. No evidence of burial outside the church. Site of Lady’s Well c. 75m to NNW.
5-10-1988

BALLYANNE
OS 29:4:4 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Ballyanne within rectangular graveyard. Grass-covered remains of nave (L 13m; Wth 8.5m) with N and S walls of chancel (int. L 5.2m; int. Wth 4.5m; H 1.5-2m). Lady’s Well c. loom to NE.
16-6-1988

BALLYBOHER
OS 47:16:3 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Church Parish church of Ishartmon within rectangular graveyard. Described as decayed on Down Survey maps (The Past 1921, 91). Nave (dims. 10.2m E-W; 7.1m N-S) and chancel (dims. 6.2m E-W; 5.6m N-S) surviving complete except N nave wall. Pointed doorway towards Wend of S nave wall and rectangular window with glazing groove towards E end. Double bellcote over W gable. Chancel arch, originally rounded but now altered with brickwork.
Nave walls overs ail those of chancel by 1.2m. E window blocked but small pointed window in both N and S walls, each with glazing grooves. Aumbry and niche at S end of E wall with shelf at N end. Circular granite font within nave.
11-8-1988

BALLYBRENNAN
OS 31:3:2 ‘St Cowan’s Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Kilcowanmore within subrectangular graveyard possibly on site of early monastic church. Single cell church oriented ESE-WNW (dims. 21.5m x 7m) with only W wall surviving to full height. Possible entrances towards W end of N and S walls. Remains of later building (dims. c. 8m N-S; 4m E-W) built over E end of church. Fragment of early cross-slab and medieval grave-cover in graveyard. St Cowan’s Well, where patterns were held on 3rd February in 1920s lies c. loom to SW.
1-10-1987

BALLYBRENNAN BIG
OS 48:1:1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Church Parish church of Ballybrennan within subrectangular graveyard. Rectangular structure with good quoins (dims. 6.3m N-S; at least 9.7m E-W) of which W wall and most of N wall are removed. Pointed doorway towards Wend of S wall. Opposingwindows towards E end of N and S walls, that on S pointed with glazing groove, and pointed E window. Plain aumbry on S wall with broken shelf on N side of E wall. Hanging-eyes survive for all windows and the door, All features are of dressed granite. Rectangular granite font within graveyard. Site of St Keevil’s Well, where patterns were held on 27th August lies c. 75m to SE.
24-6-1988

BALLYCANEW
OS 16:4:3 ‘Church’ Church (site) Parish church of Ballycanew within sub circular raised graveyard (dims. 44m E-W; 30m N-S). Present Church of Ireland church thought to occupy site of older church. Bullaun stone in NE corner.
6-11-1987

BALLYCONNICK
OS 46:4:1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Church Parish church of Ballyconnick within subrectangular graveyard. Nave (dims. 10.3m E-W; 6.6m N-S) and chancel (dims. 5.5m E-W; 5.9m N-S) church, the walls of which are reduced to H of 1-1.7m. Opposing doors, now destroyed, towards W end of nave walls. Rectangular font, probably unfinished since lacking drain-hole, in nave.
28-9-1988

BALLYDUFF
OS 10:8:4 ‘Kilcomb Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Kilcomb within triangular graveyard. Rectangular building with two cells created by inserted wall, oriented E- W with walls of shale and quartz (H c. 1m). W cell (int. L 12.3m; int. Wth 5m) and E cell (int. L 3.75m; int. Wth 5m) connected by doorway (Wth 0.75m) at S end of dividing wall. Blocked doorway adjacent to dividing wall in S wall of W cell.
19-6-1987

BALLYHACK
OS 44:6:5 ‘Grave Yard’ Church (site) Probable site of parish church of St James and Dunbrody within stone-walled graveyard. Church described as ‘in ruins’ in Civil Survey; repaired by Ecclesiastic Commissioners in 1830’s and still in use in 1841. Not visible at ground level. Sculptured stones (1385) probably from church now at Arthurstown.
14-10-1988

BALLYHOGE
OS 32:5:6 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish Church of Ballyhoge possibly of early origin. W wall survives to H of 2m. Other walls are grass-covered foundations (L 20.5m; Wth 8m). Within D-shaped graveyard which occupies N part of oval enclosure (dims. c. 120m N-S; c. 90m E-W). Site of St John’s Well where pattern was held on 24th June until c. 1800 (O’Flanagan 1933, vol. 2, 44) lies c. 30m
to N,
6-10-1987

BALLYKEEROGEMORE
OS 39:7: 1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Church Parish church of Ballybrazil within triangular graveyard. E gable and adjacent N and S walls survive to roof level (dims. 8.2m E-W; 6.13m N-S; H 2.5m). Full length defined by scarp at W (L c. 19m). Small window in N and S walls and small E window with alcoves on either side, each with a slate base and semicircular niche on outer edge. Wall-tops surmounted by oversailing parapet with drain-holes. Bawn of Ballykeerogemore (1506) c. 200m to SSW.
7-8-1988

BALLYLANNAN
OS 45:4: 1 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Church Parish church of Ballylannan within rectangular graveyard. Rectangular structure (dims. 13.9m E-W; 6.67m N-S; H c. 2.5m) adapted to a mausoleum in 1824. Pointed granite doorway and small window, both in N wall and both blocked, are only original features.
5-10-1988

BALLYMACLARE
OS 34:12:4 Not indicated Church ( site) Marked ‘site of Chapel and burial Ground’ and faintly outlined with enclosing feature on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Cairn material removed c. 1970 when bullaun stone and fragment of window casement were recovered.
5-8-1988

BALLYMITTY
OS 41:9:6 ‘Church (Site of)’ Church (site) Parish church of Ballymitty. Low outline of rectangular structure (dims. 13m E-W; 10m N-S) on area of rock outcrop. Seven stone fragments of window surrounds with glazing grooves on site. No evidence of burial or enclosure. St Peter’s Well, now covered, where pattern was held on 29th June until c. 1800, lies c. loom to W.
8-9-1988

BALLYMORE
OS 33:6:4 Church (site) Parish church of Screen within raised rectangular graveyard (dims. 39m E-W; 27m N-S). O’Donovan records the former existence of old church. Not visible at ground level. Oval stone (0.52m x 0.35m; H 0.35m) with oval socket in N of graveyard. Natural spring c. loom to W, where patterns were held on 27th September until c. 1820.
24-10-1987

BALLYMORE DEMESNE
OS 16:6:3 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ Possible parish church of Kilbride absorbed by Ferns before seventeenth century. Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 55) refers to ‘ancient church held in great veneration’. Present Church of Ireland church within small subrectangular graveyard is later nineteenth century. St Bridget’s Well, now covered with a boulder, lies c.S 200m to W. Ballymore motte (939) 300m to W.
9-8-1987

BALLYNABERNY
OS 10:5:4 ‘Kilrush Ch. G. Yd.’ Church ( site) Parish church of Kilrush within circular graveyard (diam. c. 65m) defined by earthen bank with double bullaun stone outside enclosure at W. Possibly of early origin. Name and tradition indicate ancient church. No visible remains of early structure at ground level.
16-6-1987

BALLYNASLANEY
OS 32:10:2 ‘St David’s Ch. (site of)’ Parish church of Ballynaslaney within rectangular graveyard. Marked ‘church (site of)’ on 1841 and 1925 OS 6-inch maps. Not visible at ground level. St David’s Well and bath-house nearby, where pattern still held on first of March. Doorway from this church now at Saunderscourt (1297) (Lewis 1837, vol. 2,198).
16-10-1987

BALLYNASTRAW
OS 26:7:5 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’ Probable parish church of Ballyhuskard within rectangular graveyard. O’Donovan records existence of S wall (L 3m; H 3m) which has since disappeared. Bullaun stone in graveyard. Site of St Peter’s Well, at which pattern was held on 29th June until c. 1800 lies c. l00m to E.

BALLYVALDON
OS 27:12:3 ‘R.C. Chapel (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Ballyvaldon within rectangular graveyard. Rectangular building oriented NE-SW (int. L 16.7m; int. Wth 5.5m). Walls survive to roof level with window openings in E gable (blocked) and at E ends of N and S walls. Round-headed door with uncut voussoirs at Wend of S wall. Wall cupboard or aumbry at E end of S wall. Window high in W gable now obscured by Ivy. Mound (61) c. loom to E.
22-10-1987

BALLYVALLOO LOWER
OS 33:7:5 ‘Ballyvalloo Ch. (in Ruins), G. Yd.’ Parish church of Ballyvalloo within raised oval graveyard (35m E-W; 23m N-S) defined by stone wall. Grass-covered foundations of nave (L 10.5m; Wth 9.3m) and chancel (L 7. 7m; Wth 5.4m) of mortared shale (H 3m). Round chancel arch (Wth 1.63m) of uncut stone and destroyed window opening at E end of chancel. Site of St Peter’s Well, at which patterns were held on 29th June is c. loom to E.
26-10-1987

BARNADOWN
OS 2:2:4 ‘Kilcashel Church (Site of), Grave Yard (disused)’ Church Foundations of rectangular building (dims. 22.3m E-W; 7.8m N-S; H c. 0.8m) with possible entrance (Wth 1.8m) surviving in the N wall. Within roughly oval enclosure (max. dim. 137m NW-SE) defined by stone wall WNW-NE with an earthen bank continuing on this line to SE outside the graveyard and modern walls elsewhere. Enclosure site (491) within the graveyard.
26-6-1987

BISHOPLAND
OS 32:8:3 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ Parish church of St Nicholas. Grass-covered foundations of small rectangular building of shale and quartz stones (dims. lorn E-W; 6m N-S) with N wall largely missing. No visible remains of burial or enclosure at ground level.
30-10-1987

BOLABAUN
OS 37:5:2 ‘Chapel Carron (Site of), Grave Yard (disused)’ Possible parish church of Chapel Carron within subrectangular enclosure (dims. 26m E-W; 10-14m N-S) backing onto rayine (H c. 6m) at S. Foundations of rectangular building oriented ENE-WSW (int. dims. 6.25m x 3.65m) with possible entrance at S. No evidence of burial. St Nicholas’ Well lies c. 300m to SW.
23-9-1988

BOLGERSTOWN
OS 37:9:3 ‘Graveyard (disused)’ Church D-shaped graveyard (dims. c. 47m N-S; c.43m E-W) defined by straight field fence at Wand scarp and fosse (Wth 3m; D below interior 1.4m; D below exterior 0.7m) elsewhere to E. Within are fragmentary remains of clay-bonded structure (dims. 9.8m E-W; 5.4m N-S). No headstones or grave markers.
30-11-1990

BORLEAGH
OS 3: 13:4 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Grass-covered remains of undivided nave and chancel church (dims. 2lm E-W; 8m N-S; H 0.5-lm) within rectangular graveyard. No distinguishing features. Doorway may have been at Wend of N wall where there is a break. Limerick Castle (1621) c. 500m to W.
1-7-1987

BREGORTEEN
OS 36:12:3 ‘St Bridget’s Church (in ruins)’ Parish church of Kilbrideglynn. Marked ‘St. Bridget’s Church (in ruins)’ within small oval enclosure on 1841 and 1924 OS 6-inch maps and described by O’Donovan as consisting only of foundations (L c. 16m; Wth c. 6m). Enclosure and foundations removed since c.1970. Not visible at ground level.
12-8-1988

BUSH
OS 48:2:1 ‘St Michael’s Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of St Michael. Rectangular structure (dims. 9m E-W; 5.8m N-S) defined by grass-covered bank with entrance (Wth 1.3m) at W. Within circular graveyard (diam. 30m) defined by earthen bank (Wth 2.5m; int. H 0.4m; ext. H 1.7m): Site of St Michael’s Well, where patterns were held on 29th September lies c. 60m to SE.
22-6-1988

CARNAGH
OS 35:9:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Carnagh within rectangular graveyard, described as ‘in ruins’ in the late seventeenth century. Rectangular building (dims. 13.6m E-W; 7.05m N-S) surviving to roof level with inserted rectangular window in E gable and smaller window in W gable. No other features.
21-7-1988

CARRICK
OS 45: 12:3 ‘Church (Site of)’ Possible parish church of Carrick depicted faintly as a small rectangular structure within a D-shaped enclosure. No visible remains at ground level apart from circular granite basin, possibly a unfinished font. No enclosure or evidence of burial. Three crosses c. 300m to NE (1384) thought to have come from this site.
26-11-1988

CASTLEBRIDGE
OS 32: 16:6 ‘Church (Site of), G. Yd.’ Marked ‘Church (site of)’ on 1841 and 1925 OS 6-inch maps. Lewis (1837, vol. 1, 45) says present C of I church built in 1764 on site of a castle. No visible traces at ground level within rectangular graveyard.
2-5-1988

CASTLEELLIS
OS 27:6:5 ‘Church, G. Yd.’ Parish church of Castleellis. O’Donovan records that an old church was pulled down before the erection of the nineteenth-century church. Foundations visible are those of nineteenth-century church within rectangular graveyard. St John’s Well, a rectangular masonry structure where patterns were held on 24th June in nineteenth century, lies c. 150m to E of church.
16-10-1987

CHAPEL
OS 31:1:3 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Chapel parish within circular graveyard. Single-cell church oriented ESE- WNW with wide spread of collapsed walls (int. L 12.8m; int. Wth 5.8m). Entrance (Wth 1.7m) towards Wend of S wall. St Francis’ Well with mortared stone wall surround is located c. 500m to SSW.
25-9-1987

CHURCHTOWN
OS 11:7:6 ‘Church, G. Yd.’ Parish church of Liskinfere, within subrectangular graveyard. O’Donovan records that site of old church of Clogh is occupied by modern Church of Ireland. No visible remains of older structure at ground level.
23-6-1987

CHURCHTOWN
OS 54:7:2 ‘Hook Church (in ruins), Burial Gd.’ Parish church of Hook within subrectangular graveyard and of early origin. Dedicated to St Dubhan, a Welsh saint who settled here in the fifth century, after whom the Hook peninsula was called Rinn Dubhan. Medieval references date from 1245 when chaplains of St Saviour of Rindeaun were urged to maintain the lighthouse (1494).

Nave, extended in length (dims. 13.7m E-W; 6.05m N-S) and later chancel (dims. 8.1m E-W; 5.05m N-S) survive almost complete. Nave (original int. L 5.6m) is earlier and E wall has remains of antae and destroyed window over chancel arch. Nave extended to W end provided with opposing round- headed doorways towards W end, that on N with stoup in situ. Corbels at W end for gallery and W gable has
double bellcote. Blocked door towards E end of N nave wall. Chancel has three-light ogee-headed window with glazing grooves on E wall and statue shelf and niche at N end of E wall. Three small windows on S wall and one on N. Piscina, aumbry and Easter Sepulchre in chancel.
22-3-1986

CHURCHTOWN (Bridgetown ED)
OS 47:10:1 ‘St. David’s Church’ Church (site) Probable parish church of Mulrankin, described by Lewis (1837, vol. 2,413) as a small plain building beyond repair, on whose site the Ecclesiastic Commissioners were to build a new church. No visible ground-level remains of older structure within rectangular graveyard.
27-3-1989

CHURCHTOWN (Kilscoran ED)
OS 48:2:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Rosslare. Nave (dims. 13m E-W; 6.1m N-S) with only the W wall (H 2m) partly surviving and chancel (dims. 7.85m E-W; 6.25m N-S) surviving complete to roof level. Pointed chancel arch (Wth 2.05m; H 2.2m) survives with a cupboard on E face of each pier. Two-light window with granite surrounds, round heads and glazing grooves in E wall; niche at N end. N and S walls have two windows, the eastern ones with glazing grooves. Tomb-niche (Wth 2.2m; H 0.9m) in N wall. Record of a double bellcote on W wall of nave.
22-6-1988

CHURCHTOWN (Lady’s Island ED)
OS 53:7:2 ‘Church (site of)’ Parish church of Carn within subrectangular graveyard. Present abandoned Churdh of Ireland church (dims. 15.1m E-W; 6.5m N-S) has original material in the double bellcote on the stepped W gable, the reused porch door frame and the blocked arcade in the S wall. This arcade with two pointed arches of dressed granite may have led to a S transept. There is no evidence of an N transept.
28-1-1988

CHURCHTOWN (St Helen’s ED)
OS 48:7:5 ‘Church (site of)’ Parish church of Kilrane within rectangular graveyard. Only W gable (incomplete L 4.9m; H 5.2m) of what must have been a large church survives. Remains of bellcote over gable and narrow window,robbed of cut stone.
23-6-1988

CHURCHTOWN (Tacumshin ED)
OS 53:1:1 ‘St Catherine’s Church’ Parish church of Tacumshin within rectangular graveyard. References date from early fifteenth century. Nave and chancel with transepts. Nave (int. dims. 12.7m x 5.8m)
represented by W gable with pointed window and foundation courses of N wall. N transept outlined by foundation course. S transept (int. dims. 6.85m E-W; 3.5m N-S) survives to roof level with gables at E and W and statue shelf on E wall. Entered from nave by three round arches of dressed limestone voussoirs (Wth 1.9m; H 1.65m) resting on two rectangular and chamfered piers of limestone. Arches could be closed with shutters and E pier has corbels on N and S faces probably for rood screens. S transept has double ogee- headed window (damaged) at E, three single ogee-headed windows at S, one with glazing channel, and rectangular window with glazing channel at W. Transept also has tomb-niche and small bullaun stone.

Pointed chancel arch (Wth 2.2m; H 1.45m) leads to chancel (int. dims. 7.27m E-W; 3.92m N-S) surviving to roof level except at Wend of N wall. S pier of chancel has hagioscope or viewing window from nave. Three-light ogee-headed window with glazing groove, and shelf in E wall; aumbry and single-light ogee-headed window with glazing groove in S wall. Grave cover in chancel with incised floriated cross and incised inscription commemorating John Ingram, identified, possibly, as a Canon of Ferns in 1304 (The Past 1949,31). Site of St Catherine’s Well c. 150m to E.
14-7-1988

CLONATIN UPPER
OS 7:13:3 ‘Kilmakilloge Church (in ruins), Grave yard’ Church Romanesque parish church of Kilmakilloge within D-shaped graveyard defined by earthen bank. Portion of N wall (L 11.5m) and W wall (L 2.6m) survive to H of c. 3m. Indication of entrance at NW corner. Remainder of building indicated by banks and scarps (L 25m; Wth c. 7m). Twelve cut stones are from Romanesque doorway which was at W end gable and church originally had separate nave and chancel.
15-7-1987

CLONE
OS 15:15:2 ‘Clone Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Romanesque parish church of Clone within rectangular graveyard, on early monastic foundation. W gable and W part of S wall of single-cell church survive to roof level; elsewhere walls c. 1.5m high (dims. 16.95m E-W; 8.?m N-S). Lintelled W doorway, originally round-headed, with batter and chevrons on mouldings of architrave. Seven heads and stone with dogtooth decoration in outer face of wall over door. Two cross-slabs, sundial and two bullaun stones in graveyard. Third cross-slab c. 80m to SE of church. All decorated stones of church building in green stone. Romanesque window, probably from church, now at St Peter’s, Ferns (1446) and face corbels from church at St Maodhog’s Well.

CLONGEEN
OS 40:8:4 ‘Church (Site of), G. Yd.’ Parish church of Clongeen. (Flanagan 1933, vol. 2, 354) recorded that no trace of the old church was visible. Multiple cresset-stone with at least 5 cups on three facets of oblong stone in triangular graveyard. St Edan’s Well c. 30m to NW.
29-9-1988

CLONMORE
OS 31:4:5 ‘Clonmore Grave Yard’ Parish church of Clonmore within graveyard and possibly on early site. Identified as Cluain Mor Maodhog by O’Donovan (Flanagan 1933, vol. 2, 1-42) dating perhaps to the
29-9-1987

COOLHULL
OS 46:9:6 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of St Imoge or Shemoge within circular graveyard. Rectangular structure recently restored. No features visible apart from rectangular font. Rectangular pile of stones attached to E wall. St Imock’s Well or Shemoge well, where patterns were held on l0th December located c. 400m to S.
20-9-1988

COOLRAINEY
OS 33:15:0 Church ( site) Parish church of St Margarets’ or Raven. Destroyed in eighteenth century when sea encroached a quarter mile on coast (Lewis 1837, vol. 2, 343). St Margaret’s Well, a natural pond, may have been close to this site.
27-10-1987

COOLSTUFF
OS 41:4:2 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Coolstuff within rectangular graveyard. Nave (L 19.3m; Wth 8.8m) and chancel visible as grass covered foundations and sections of N wall (L 5m) and S wall (L 7.5m) of nave surviving to height of c. 2.6m. Indications of possible doorways towards W end of nave walls. Bullaun stone and rectangular font within church. Site of Lady’s Well c. 90m to E.
15-9-1988

COURTHOYLE OLD
OS 35:3:4 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ References date from the thirteenth century when it was known as the chapel of Hoel. Cairn material, a bullaun stone and pointed head of a slit window, within rectangular graveyard. Site of Tobermurry c. 100m to N.
5-7-1988

DONAGHMORE
OS 17:7:2 ‘Ch. (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Donaghmore within rectangular graveyard. The present ruins are of the eighteenth- or early nineteenth-century C of I church rebuilt on site of older church of which nothing remains.
23-7-1987

DOONOONEY
OS 31: 14:2 ‘Church (Site of)’ Parish church of Doonooney. Marked ‘church in ruins’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Slightly dished oval area (dims. 60m N-S; 38m E-W) defined by a slight scarp with traces of external fosse (Wth 12m; D 0.2m) ENE-SE. No evidence of burial apart from fragment of one headstone. Adjacent to motte site
30-9-1987

DRILLISTOWN
OS 39:12:5 ‘Church (in Ruins)’ Church Probable parish church of Killesk. Foundation courses of rectangular building oriented E-W (int. dims. 8.3m E-W; 4.2m N-S; max. H 1.4m). No visible features. Within D-shaped graveyard (dims. 58m N-S; 35m E-W) with straight edge at S. Enclosure defined by stone-clad earthen bank (Wth c.2.5m; int. H 1.5m) augmented at S and adjacent parts of W and E (Wth 6m).
6-4-1988

DRINAGH SOUTH
OS 42:8:6 ‘Drinagh Church (in ruins), GraveYd.’ Parish church of Drinagh; dedicated to St Kevin within rectangular graveyard. Nave (dims. 12.52m E-W; 7.4m N-S) and chancel (dims. 5.7m E-W; 5.5m N-S) connected by round chancel arch. Walls survive generally to roof level (H 1.9-2.5m) except N wall of nave reused as handball alley (H 5m) and N wall of chancel (H O.3m). Gallery supported on corbels, most now missing, at W end of nave. Opposing doorways towards W end of nave and single-lights towards E end, those on N side blocked. Window at W end of nave, also blocked. S wall of chancel possibly rebuilt and E window robbed but niche survives on N side. No dressed stone apart from round head of window in S of nave. Rectangular granite font in nave. Mound site (63) c. 80m to SE.
13-10-1988

DUNBRODY
OS 39;10:5 ‘Chapel (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Capella ante portas (lay chapel) of Dunbrody Abbey , within rectangular graveyard. Rectangular building oriented E-W (dims. 11.6m E-W; 6.7m N-S) surviving to roof level except for N wall. W doorway with stump of stoup attached to wall inside. Inserted limestone rectangular window, originally of two lights with square hood-moulding, in E gable and doorway in W. Church attached to gatehouse (1557) immediately to W.
31-8-1988

DUNCORMICK
OS 46:11:4 ‘Church, Grave Yard’ Parish church of Duncormick within rectangular graveyard, replaced by C of I church c . 1810; now derelict. St Clomaun’s Well where a stone with inscription ‘R.C. 1696’ was found c. 400m to S. Adjacent to motte.
15-6-1988

GLEBE
OS 3:5:1 ‘Burial Ground’ Church ( site) Parish church of Kilnenor within graveyard which is an irregular raised area defined by earthen bank (dims. 53m N-S; 45m E-W). Church had been destroyed by the mid-nineteenth century. Kilnenor Well, at which pattern was held on 8th September until 1798 (ibid.) is rectangular drystone-walled structure c. 30m SW of church site.
1-7-1987

GLEBE
OS 16:15:6 ‘Ch., G. Yd.’ Parish church of Monamolin within small triangular graveyard. Present Church of Ireland church built in 1824 on site of older church of which no remains survive. St Moling’s Well, a circular drystone-walled and lintelled structure where the pattern was held on 17th of June ( ibid. ) lies c. 350m to S.
9-9-1987

GLEBE
OS 22:1:3 ‘Church (site of)’ Parish church of Kiltrisk. Rectangular area (dims. 39m E-W; 35m N-S) defined by field fences on E and S sides and slight scarp elsewhere. No visible remains of church at ground level and no evidence of burial. Kiltrisk Well, a natural spring, c. loom to E. Possible motte (941) c. 350m to S.
14-8-1987

GLEBE
OS 26:14:1 ‘Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Edermine within rectangular graveyard. O’Donovan records that old church was pulled down. Records of church go back to fourteenth century. No visible remains at ground level. St Kieran’s Well, protected by circular masonry wall (diam. 4.7m) built on present site some time after 1841. Located c. 700m N of church site. Possible standing stone (129) within the graveyard.
3-5-1987

GLEBE
OS 42:13:1 ‘Kilmannan Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Fortified parish church of Kilmannan within rectangular graveyard. Only tower at W end remains (dims. 5.7m E-W; 5.4m N-S; H c. 7.5m) lacking batter or quoins. Entrance to tower (from church) at E was protected by murder-hole. Lobby leads to vaulted ground floor with three window embrasures (destroyed) and mural stairs rising in E and N walls to first-floor doorway at NW angle. First floor had two window embrasures, one of which is damaged, with seats. Gun loop and large opening, in E wall, possibly a doorway leading to gallery over Wend of nave. Entrance to mural stairs in NE corner destroyed and stairs, now inaccessible, rise in N wall to second floor, which has windows with seats in Wand S walls. Floor was supported by joists set directly into walls. Stairs continue in N wall, probably to wall-walk. Bellcote may still survive but is obscured by ivy. Bullaun stone, c. 50m to SW and site of St Mannan’s Well, where patterns were held on 6th July, lies c. 300m to S.
12-10-1988

GLEBE
OS 47:7:1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Mayglass within rectangular graveyard. References date from early fourteenth century. Nave and chancel (total L 25.6m; max. Wth 7.88m) of which survive only E gable of chancel with its window, W gable with double bellcote and blocked window together with parts of S wall containing Romanesque doorway which was repaired in 1914. Site of St Fintan’s Well, where pattern was held on 17th February, located c. 130m to S.
18-8-1988

GLEBE
OS 52:2:5 ‘St John’s Church, Grave Yard’ Church (site). church of Kilturk. O’Donovan records that the old church was demolished c. 1815. No visible remains at ground level. Circular graveyard (diam. 42m) defined by earthen bank (int. H c. Im). Slight traces of outer fosse at S and W.
20-7-1988

GLEBE (Castle Talbot ED)
OS 27:15:2 ‘Killila Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Killila within oval graveyard. O’Donovan records that an old church existed here. No visible remains at ground level. St Bridget’s Well, a natural spring where a pattern was held on 1st February until c. 1800, lies c. loom to N.
20-10-1987

GRAHEEROGE
OS 48:9:4 ‘Church (site of)’ Marked only on 1940 OS 6-inch map. Visible as circular cropmark (diam. c. 40m) on aerial photographs (ASIAP, WX 71, 9-13). Not visible at ground level. Crudely worked portion of font stem, originally located cc. 300m to N but now at Curracloe, may have been moved from site. ,
30-6-1988

GRAHORMICK
OS 47:12:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Ballymore within subrectangular graveyard. Nave (dims. 16.6m NW-SE; 6.8m NE-SW) with walls surviving to roof level except NE wall and later chancel (dims. 7.35m NW-SE; 5.4m NE-SW) destroyed to foundations. Round-headed doorway of undressed stone in S wall of nave and remains of N doorway. Two rectangular windows in S wall, the E with glazing groove, and narrow light in W gable. Bellcote destroyed. Pointed chancel arch of undressed stone (Wth 2.05m; H 1.66m). Fragment of octagonal font within nave with rectangular font outside church. Chancel is later than nave since original E window embrasure is in evidence above chancel arch which also has statue shelf and aumbry in adjacent S wall.
18-8-1988

GRANGE (Kilmore ED)
OS 52:1:6 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Kilmore within rectangular graveyard, possibly of early origin. Nave (original dims. 10.7m E-W; c. 6.5m N-S) extended at W (total L 21.7) and later chancel (dims. 8.05m E-W; 5.73m N-S) with walls surviving to H of c. 2.5m, except W wall of nave, N wall of chancel and parts of N wall of nave. Chancel has two-light ogee-headed E window with glazing groove and two windows, one blocked and one rectangular with glazing groove, in S wall. Rounded chancel arch (Wth 1.5m; H 1.7m). Nave has no features visible apart from round-headed doorway (Wth 0.95m; H 1.75m) with stoup on S wall at W end and two corbels on N and S walls at E end, perhaps for rood loft. Whitty memorial, dated 1647 and memorial of Patrick Fitznicoll dated 1659 within the nave. Aerial photograph shows cropmark of possible circular enclosure (diam. c. 90m) which is not visible at ground level. Site of St Patrick’s Well, where patterns were held on St Joseph’s day, 19th March lies c. 270m to ESE.
21-7-1988

HORETOWN SOUTH
OS 41:1:2 ‘St James’s Church, Grave Yard’ Possible parish church of Horetown within D-shaped graveyard (dims. 60m N-S; c. 40m E-W), defined by earthen bank (Wth c. 2m; ext. H 1.8-2.2m) on all sides except W where eighteenth- century Church of Ireland church stands. Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 9) records that ruins of Carmelite abbey which may have served as parish church used in building present Church of Ireland church. No visible remains of older foundation at ground level.
14-9-1988

INCH
OS 3:14:3 ‘Church, Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Inch, Barony of Gorey, Arklow, within subrectangular graveyard. Described as ruinous but chancel in repair in survey of 1630 (JRSAI 1927, 105). Site occupied by nineteenth-century Church of Ireland church. No visible remains of older structure at ground level.
2-7-1987

KAYLE
OS 40:6:2 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd’ Parish church of Inch, Barony of Shelmaliere West, within sub circular enclosure defined by stone-clad earthen bank but with no evidence of burial. Widely spread walls of rectangular building oriented E-W (dims. 10.5m E-W; 4.3m N-S). Entrance with plain granite jamb in S wall. Regarded as possible site of early monastery of lnisdoimle founded by St Bairrfhinn early in Christian era. Site of Lady’s Well c. 250m to N.
15-9-1988

KERLOGE
OS 42:4:6 ‘Church (site of), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Kerloge. Described by Synnott writing c. 1680 as a former convent of the Knights Templars, it may be site of St Aloch’s Church mentioned in charter of Henry II in 1172 but this is disputed by Hore. Foundation course of wall (L 14.4m) oriented N-S thought to be remains of church but graveyard removed. St James’ Well c. 10m to S. Altar from here now erected outside Roman Catholic Church of the Assumption in Wexford town.
28-11-1988

KILCAVAN
OS 46:1:3 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard.’ Parish church of Kilcavan, Bargy, within sub-circular graveyard. Nave (dims. 12.9m E-W; 9.5m N-S) and chancel (dims. 7.2m E-W; c. 6m N-S) with walls surviving complete except N wall of nave, and S and E walls of chancel which are totally destroyed. W gable has double bellcote and slit window. Pointed doorway of undressed stone towards W end of S wall.
Rounded chancel arch (Wth 2.06m; H 1.85m) and tomb niche on N chancel wall. St Cavan’s Well, where patterns were held on 12th June in nineteenth century lies c. 600m to SW.
21-9-1988

KILCAVANLOWER
OS 7:7:2 ‘Kilcavan Grave Yard’ Church ( site) Parish church of Kilcavan, Gorey, within rectangular graveyard. One length of wall running N-S (L 8.6m) is all that remains of the church. St Winifred’s Well, a natural spring, c. 240m to S.
16-7-1987

KILCORMICK
OS 21:5:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Kilcormick within sub circular graveyard (dims. 61m N-S; 55m E-W) defined by earthen bank. Foundations of N and S walls of building oriented E-W (L c. 20m; Wth c. 6.5m). Site of St Cormick’s Well, at which patterns were still celebrated on 22nd June in 1840 located c. 500m to SE.
19-8-1987

KILDAVINLOWER
OS 42:10:3 ‘Kildavin Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Kildavin within sub circular graveyard. Foundation courses of nave (int. dims. 10.4m E-W; 5.45m N-S) and chancel (int. dims. 5m E-W; 3.9m N-S) divided by destroyed chancel arch (Wth 1.82m). Single slit window and corbels towards E end of N nave wall, possibly for a rood screen. Rectangular granite font with its base within nave. Site of St Davin’s Well at which patterns were held on 1st August c. 150m to NW.
12-10-1988

KILGARVAN
OS 36:10:1 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard.’ Parish church of Kilgarvan originally within circular graveyard (diam. c. 60m), but bank removed E-W. Church foundations, described as L c. 18m and Wth c. 5m (O’Flanagan 1933, vol. 2, 47-8) and visible on aerial photograph were tidied up forming a pile of stones in 1975. One fragment of medieval grave-cover in graveyard. Site of St Garvan’s Well c. 250m to E.
5-10-1988

KILGORMAN
OS 7:8:2 ‘Kilgorman Church (site of), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Kilgorman within rectangular graveyard defined by earthen bank (dims. 33m N-S; 30m E-W) with raised central area (dims. 23m E-W; 18m N-S). O’Donovan records remains of church, now no longer evident. Recumbent slab with ringed cross in relief within graveyard. Mound site (64) c. l00m to SE. Site of Kilgorman Well adjacent to S;
20-7-1987

KILLESK
OS 39:12:1 ‘Church (Site of)’ Fortified church of Killesk. References to the quarter fee of Killesk date from 1324 and to the castle (1601) from 1568. References to church date from 1370. External remains consist of tower (dims. 8.3m N-S; 5.4m E-W) with projection to E (dims. 7.9m E-W; 6.9m N-S) which is a church, incorporating vaulted ground floor of the tower. Church had tall windows in E wall and towards E end of N and S walls (all destroyed). Entrance in S wall of tower protected by murder-ho1e, gives access to church and spiral stairs at SW comer which goes up to gallery under vault of tower. Mural stairs in S wall give access to wa1l-walk (destroyed) of church with oubliette off stairs. Spiral stairs continue to first floor of tower which had four lights and no fireplace. Second storey destroyed but garderobe chute still in evidence. Church against W side of rectangular enclosure (dims. 50m N-S; 32m E- W) defined by a slight bank or scarp but no evidence of burial.
24-8-1988

KILLIANE LITTLE
OS 43:13:1 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Parish church of Killiane within circular graveyard. Nave (dims. 9.35m NW-SE; 6.8m NE-SW) with good quoins and walls surviving almost complete and chancel (5.8m NW-SE; 5.75m NE-SW) surviving only as foundation courses except S corner. Nave has pointed doorways of uncut stone with hanging-eyes, towards Wend of N and S walls and small rectangular windows towards E end of N and S walls. Pointed chancel arch (Wth 1.4m; H 2.55m) survives complete. Bullaun stone i nave.
5-7-1988

KILLILLANE
OS 48:12:5 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Parish church of St Helens within triangular graveyard on promontory. Listed by Synnott c. 1680 (JRSAI 1862, 67). Rectangular structure (dims. 12.3m E-W; 6m N-S) with walls surviving to H of 1-2m, except S wall which may be rebuilt. Collapsed entrance (Wth 1.45m) at W. Small window towards E end of N wall. Deiifribed (The Past 1949, 44) as having had a narrow doorway with large lintel surmounted by small window in W wall. St Helen’s Well c. 75m to W.
27-6-1988

KILLINCOOLY BEG
OS 28:1:2 ‘Killincooly Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Killincooly within raised subrectangular graveyard (dims. 33m E-W; 31m N-S) curved at N and S. Church marked on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible traces at ground level. Granite stone (dims. 0.5m x 0.32m x 0.3m) with perforation and petal-like decoration in relief on one side. Two polished quartz bowls and fragment of stone cresset. St Mochain’s Well with modern superstructure lies c. 200m to NW.
23-10-1987

KILLISK
OS 27: 9: 1 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Parish church of Killisk within circular enclosure which is curtailed by laneway at S (dims. 39m E-W; 32m N-S) and defined by earthen bank (Wth 3-8m; H 0.3-0.7m). Grass-covered remains of nave (L 10.5m; Wth 8.5m) and chancel (L 7m; Wth 6m). Round chancel arch of uncut stone still stands. No evidence of burial. Site of St Bridget’s Well, located c. 350m to N.
3-5-1988

KILLURIN
OS 37;1:2 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Killurin within rectangular graveyard. O’Donovan records that the old church was removed c.1800 when present C of I church built. St Laurence’s Well, a rock pool with the capital of a column nearby, lies c. 350m S of church site.
23-9-1988

KILMACREE
OS 42:16:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Kilmacree within subrectangular graveyard. References date from 1541. Nave (int. dims. 12m E-W; 4.4m N-S) and chancel (int. dims. c. 4.5m E-W; 3.6m N-S) defined by low grass-covered walls (Wth 0.8-1.4m). Pointed chancel arch survives (Wth 1.4m; H 1.9m) with piers of dressed limestone and doorways (Wth 0.7m) towards W end of nave walls. Font now at Ballykelly (1336).
13-10-1988

KILMALLOCK
OS 32:3:3 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Kilmallock within raised oval graveyard. Two small fragments of wall foundation of NW corner (dims. 6m E-W; 5m N-S). Site of St Mary’s Well, where patterns were held on 15th August in nineteenth century (O’F1anagan 1933, vol. 1,356) lies c. 350m to S.
27-10-1987

KILMUCKRIDGE
OS 22:13:1 ‘Church, Grave Yard’ Parish church of Kilmuckridge within D-shaped graveyard. Old church pulled down c. 1820 when present Church of Ireland church built. N o visible remains of old church at ground level. Site of Bride’s Well located c. 450m to SW.
17-8-1987

KILNAHUE
OS 6:16:1 ‘Kilnahue Burial Gr.’ Parish church of Kilnahue within oval graveyard defined by stone-revetted earthen bank (dims. 50m E-W; 44m N-S). Overgrown remains of stone building oriented E-W (dims. 20m E-W; 6.5m N-S). Cross-base to N of church. Souterrain (394) c.25m N of church.
12-6-1987

KILNAMANAGH LOWER
OS 21:15:1 Church ( site) Parish church of Kilnamanagh. Old church pulled down c. 1800. No visible traces at ground level. Holy well, a natural spring, adjacent.
10-9-1987

KILPATRICK
OS 21:8:Church (site) Marked as a graveyard on 1841 OS 6-inch map. Rectangular area (dims. 50m E-W; 47m N-S) defined by remains of earthen bank on all sides except W where there is a field fence and S where bank is intermittent. Remains of rectangular building (into dims. Co 11m x Co 4o5m) have disappeared since 1940s No record of burial.
9-9-1987

KILSCANLAN
OS 35:9:3 ‘Church (Site of)’ Probable parish church of Kilscanlan. Marked ‘site of church’ on 1841 OS 6-inch map. No visible traces of church or record of graveyard.
22-7-1988

KILSCORAN
OS 48:6:6 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Kilscoran within rectangular graveyard. References to the church of Kilscoran date from later fourteenth century and O’Donovan says site now occupied by modern Church of Ireland church. No visible traces of older structure at ground level.
23-2-1988

KILTENNELL
OS 12:3:4 ‘Kiltennel Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Kiltennel within D-shaped graveyard defined by earthen bank (NE-S-NW) with scarp down to stream forming straight side at N (dims. 40m E-W; 36m N-S). Single cell church. N and S walls of coarsed mortared shale remain (H 2m; int. L 15.3m; int. Wth 5.5m) with entrance (Wth 0.9m) towards Wend of S wall.
10-11-1987

KILTILLY
OS 5:13:6 ‘Church (site of)’ Southern edge of site destroyed in building farm outhouses when bones were found. Site consists of sub circular area defined by two very denuded and interrupted banks (max. ext. dims. 35m N-S; 33m E-W). No grave-markers. Tobermurry Well, a lintelled rectangular well, with modern granite cross (H 0.58m), lies just SE of site.
3-6-1987

KINNAGH
OS 45:2:1 ‘Church (in ruins), G. Yd.’ Parish church of Kinnagh within subrectangular graveyard. Only the foundation courses and rubble from the walls remain (dim~. 19.5m E-W; 8.1m N-S). E wall survives to H of 4m but window robbed. St Martin’s Well, still venerated, c. 600m to E.
27-11-1988

LADY’S ISLAND
OS 53:2:3 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’Parish church of Lady’s Island within sub circular graveyard. Tradition that AugustinianCanons regulated pilgrimages here in Middle Ages. Plenary indulgence granted to pilgrims in early seventeenth century. Only W gable (oriented NE-SW; L 6.33m) with narrow window and double bellcote survives with adjoining portion of side walls. Fragment of three-light cusped ogee-headed window with glazing groove in graveyard. Separated from mainland by causeway guarded by tower house and double curtain wall. Our Lady’s Well which was part of the pilgrimage route lies c. 500m to E.
7-7-1988

MIDDLETOWN
OS 12:10:6 ‘St Mary’s Graveyard’ Parish church of Ardamine within rectangular graveyard. No visible remains at ground level. Head of plain Latin cross (H 0.65m; Wth 0.72m; T 0.16m) probably seventeenth century, protruding from ground at S end of graveyard. Adjacent to motte and bailey.
26-6-1987

MILLQUARTER
OS 30:14:2 ‘St Mary’s Church, G. Yd.’ Parish church of Old Ross within rectangular graveyard. Foundations of L-shaped wall to N of present church may be remains of old church. Cross-inscribed pillar in graveyard. Motte (955) c. 450m to NW.
1-7-1988

MONACAHEE
OS 39:16:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Burial Ground (disused)’ Possible parish church of Rathroe built within ringfort (347). Foundations of rectangular structure(dims. 22m ESE-WNW; 7m NNE-SSW) with entrance towards Wend of S wall. E end of church breaches its inner bank. No evidence of burial. Church remains may be post-medieval.
6-9-1988

MONEYHORE
OS 25:3:1
Church(site) Rectangular area (dims. 23m E-W; 19m N-S) with cairn (dims. 8m N-S; 4m E-W; H 0.4m) containing quartz stones. Also head of round-headed window in granite and two large granite voussoirs. No evidence of enclosure or burial. Nearby farmhouse has two portions of eight-sided cross. Stone cresset, presumably from site, now in County Museum, Enniscorthy.
17-8-1987

MONEYTUCKER
OS 25:6:6 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Rossdroit within subrectangular graveyard. Extensively restored E and W gables survive (int. L 16.2m; int. Wth c. 7.8m) but N and S walls missing. Crude window in E gable. Fragment of ogee-headed window on site.
25-8-1987

NASH
OS 35:13:5 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’ O’Donovan records foundation courses in evidence. No visible traces at ground level of church within rectangular graveyard. Site of St Colman’s Well c. 50m to W.
21-7-1988

NEWBAWN
OS 35:11:5 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’Grass-covered remains of W wall (L 5.1m), adjacent parts of N and S walls and some rubble within rectangular graveyard. Stoup on site.
26-7-1988

NEWTOWN (Carrick ED)
OS 37:11:4 ‘Carrick Church (in ruins), Grave Yard.’ Parish church of Carrick within rectangular graveyard. Dedicated to St Nicholas, references date from fourteenth century. Base of walls with uncut quoins survive to H 1-1.5m (int. dims. 13.6m E-W; 6m N-S). Entrance (Wth 0.85m) in N wall. Rectangular granite font almost buried inside entrance. Site of St Nicholas’ Well, at which patterns may have been held on 6th December (O’Flanagan 1933, vol. 1,357) lies in a ravine c. 150m to SE.
21-9-1988

NOOK
OS 44:2:1 ‘St Catherine’s Chapel (in ruins)’ Fortified church of 15th century. Rectangular structure (int. dims. 12.95m E-W; 6.25m N-S) surviving almost complete except N wall. E and W walls have base-batter. Opposing doorways towards W end, that on N now destroyed. Two rectangular windows in S wall with tall window to W of lintelled doorway in S wall (destroyed). E window is two-light with cusped ogee-head and tracery with glazing grooves. Mural stairs in W wall lead to gallery which had fireplace in W wall and to wall-walk at SW corer. No indication of burial. Within promontory fort (225).
13-10-1988

NORRISMOUNT
OS 16:1:3 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Described in 1961 as an undivided nave and chancel church (L c. 18m; Wth c. 6m) with corner buttresses and remains of porch towards Wend of S wall. Walls survived to H of c. 3m but no cut stone remained. Since destroyed. No record of burial or enclosure.
8-8-1987

PULLINSTOWN BIG
OS 19:8:4 ‘Grave Yard’ Present Church of Ireland edifice erected in 1815 but to S of it are grass-covered foundations of earlier building (12.5m E-W; 4.5m N-S) within subrectangular graveyard. Some cut stone, probably from pointed doorway recorded from site (OPW file).
22-7-1987

RATHASPICK
OS 42:7:5 ‘Site of Church, Grave Yard’ Parish church of Rathaspick within rectangular graveyard. References date from late fourteenth century (The Past 1920, 70). The church was dedicated to St Bridget in seventeenth century and was removed during 1820s when present C of I church built. No remains of earlier structure. Rectangular font and base on site. Dutchman’s Well or St Bridget’s Well located c. 250m to NE.
11-10-1988

RATHMACKNEE GREAT
OS 42:15:6 ‘Church (Site of)’ Parish church of Rathmacknee within subrectangular graveyard. Part of W wall (L 3.3m) and adjacent part of S wall (L 3.5m) survive to H of c. 0.5m. Adjacent to tower house and bawn (1542). Site of St Martin’s Well c. loom to NE. 42:29(01) 11-10-1989

RATHUMNEY
OS 40:9:1 ‘Church (Site of)’ Slightly raised square area (dims. 20m x 20m) within triangular graveyard. No visible remains of structure at ground level. Site of St Margaret’s Well c. 450m to NW.
8-9-1988

ROSSMINOGE NORTH
OS 11:2:1 ‘Rossminoge Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Rossminoge within rectangular graveyard. Only W gable (L 6.7m) survives almost to apex with destroyed doorway in centre. Church appears as a sunken area (L 13m). In S corner of graveyard is ringed but unpierced head of a large granite high cross.
25-6-1986

RYLAND LOWER
OS 9:11:5 ‘Kilmyshall Grave Yard’ Foundations of small church (L 9m; Wth 6m) at E end of trapezoidal graveyard. Unfinished cresset nearby. St Mary’s Well, an oval drystone-walled structure at which pattern was held on 22nd July until c. 1810, lies c. 40m W of church within the graveyard.
11-5-1988

ST IBERIUS’
OS 48:14:6 ‘St. Iberius’ Church (in ruins), Grave Yard.’ Parish church of St Iberius’ parish within subrectangular graveyard. Only W gable (L 8.95m) with small window and base-batter, and parts of N and S walls, the latter with round-headed doorway of undressed stone, survive. O’Donovan describes nave (int. dims. 27ft x 15ft loin) and chancel (int. dims. 22ft 4in x 14ft 4in) with round chancel arch. Illustration by Wakeman in Hore.
28-6-1988

ST JOHN’S
OS 26:1:5 ‘Church (site of), Carrig Grave yard.’ Parish church of St John’s within rectangular graveyard. O’Donovan records foundations of church (L c. 9m; Wth c. 7m) known as Corrig church which have since disappeared.
2-10-1987

SAINTKIERANS
OS 45:10:5 ‘St Kieran’s Church (in ruins)’ Church Listed as a chapel of Tintern in 1552. Grass-covered foundations of E-W structure (dims. 18.6m E-W; 7.1m N-S; H c. 0.6m). Bullaun stone within church. No evidence of burial or enclosure but old tra9kway (Wth 6.4m) running E-W just S of church.
15-11-1988

SAINTLEONARDS
OS 45:2:6 ‘St Leonard’s Church (site of), Grave Yd. (disused)’ References date from 1552. Triangular area (dims. c. 35m E~W; c. 26m N-S) defined by road fence at S, stone wall at Wand earthen bank (Wth 3.2m; ext. H 0.6m; int. H 1.15m) at NE. Stone wall footing (L 22m) runs parallel with NE bank and separated from it by wet area (Wth 6m). No recognisable foundations or evidence of burial. Site of Toberernan located c. 300m to S.
27-11-1988

ST MARGARETS
OS 53:3:2 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of St Margaret’s within subrectangular graveyard. Nave (dims. 8.1m E-W; 7.2m N-S) and chancel (dims. 8.2m E-W; 5.45m N-S) with E gable almost complete and walls decreasing in H towards W (H 0.5m). Entrance on S side of nave possibly not original. No other feature in nave. Pointed chancel arch (Wth 1.63m; H 2.1m) leads to chancel
which has pointed E window (Wth c. Im; H 1.95m) with remains of tracery and hood-moulding. Three areas of collapse at side walls may have been windows. Although nave and chancel are of equal length outer courses of nave side walls overlap those of chancel (L 1.5m at S; 2.1m at N). St Margaret’s Well c. 400m to SSE.
16-7-1988

SANCTUARY
OS 47:4:6 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Killinick. O’Donovan records that site of old church now occupied by modern one. No visible remains at ground level of older structure within small circular graveyard.
26-8-1988

SAUNDERSCOURT
OS 37:7:2 ‘Church (in Ruins), Grave Yard’ Parish church of Kilpatrick within D-shaped graveyard. Single cell rectangular building (dims. 13.9m E-W; 6.9m N-S) surviving to roof level. Doorway of two orders, early thirteenth century in date, originally from Ballynaslaney in W wall, (Lewis 1837, vol. 2, 198) with destroyed single bellcote. Four rectangular windows of two or three lights in N and S walls and large inserted mullioned and transomed window of sixteenth- or seventeenth-century date in E wall. St Patrick’s Well, a circular drystone-walled structure with steps, lies c. loom to E. Aerial photographs show
cropmarks of a roadway (L c. 200m) approaching E edge of graveyard from S.
28-9-1988

SEAFIELD
OS 7:15:1 ‘Church (Site of), Grave Yard’ Marked ‘church (site of)’ on 1841 and 1940 OS 6-inch maps, N o trace of this feature at ground level within D-shaped graveyard (dims. 58m N-S; 54m E-W) defined by earthen bank.
16-7-1987

TELLAROUGHT
OS 34:12:5 ‘Church (Site of), G. Yd.’ Parish church of Tellarought within rectangular graveyard. Marked ‘church (in ruins)’ on 1841 OS map and described as almost gone. No visible remains at ground level. Site of Lady’s Well nearby and St Bridget’s Well, which is still venerated, established in 1862 c. 100m SW of church site. Lewis (1837, vol. 2, 588) records that Tellarought was formerly an extensive settlement, remains of which were found in ploughing.
27-7-1988

TEMPLELUDIGAN
OS 24:9:2 ‘St Peter’s Church, Grave Yard’ Parish church of Templeludigan within sub circular graveyard. Record of buried foundations found in grave-digging. Nineteenth-century Church of Ireland church now removed. St Patrick’s Well, a corbelled and lintelled drystone- walled structure with steps, located c. 500m to E; now dry. Patterns were held on 17th March until c. 1820.
23-9-1987

TEMPLESHANNON
OS 20:13:6 ‘Church (in ruins), G. Yd.’ Romanesque parish church of Templeshannon with D-shaped graveyard defined by masonry wall. Nave and added chancel. Nave (L 13.1m; Wth 7.5m) walls survive to roof level except W and E which are partly rebuilt. Entrance in W wall (destroyed). Plain round-headed window in S wall at E end. Only E wall of chancel (L 11.4m; Wth 7.5m) survives with late rectangular mullioned granite window. Stoup and bullaun stone in nave.
11-5-1988

TEMPLETOWN
OS 49:12:2 ‘Church (in ruins), G. Yd.’ Fortified parish church of Templetown within rectangular graveyard. References date from 1541 when it was a rectory of the Knights Hospitallers of Kilcloggan (1528). Church has disappeared but described as having three pointed windows in E gable and was situated to S of surviving tower (dims. 7.08m E-W; 5.27m N-S). Blocked round-headed doorways of undressed stone in W and S walls at ground-floor level which has E-W barrel vault. Spiral stairs at SE corner to first floor where opening in E wall may have led to wall-walk of church. Portion of barrel vault against W wall over second floor is the only other original feature. Altered c. 1830 with insertion of ground-floor entrance at N, fireplace on ground floor, four large openings at second floor and modern, crenellations. Bullaun stone and medieval grave-cover within graveyard. Adjacent to earthwork site.
22-3-1986

TIKILLIN
OS 37:6:1 ‘Castle (in ruins)’ Church Parish church of Tikillin within rectangular graveyard. Grass-covered foundations of building (dims. 15.5m E-W; 6.85m N-S; max. H 1m) with S wall missing.
28-9-1988

TINCURRA
OS 41:12:2 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Parochial church of detached portion of Taghmon within a sub circular graveyard (dims. 38m N-S; 36m E-W) defined by stone-clad earthen bank with traces of fosse and outer bank at NE. Grass- covered foundations (H 0.5-1m) of E-W building (dims. 10.55m E-W; 4.9m N-S) with entrance towards W end of S wall. N wall extended to W (total L 13.25m) indicating possible second cell to W. Trinity Well 20m to E of enclosure.
13-9-1988

TINNACROSS
OS 20:3:6 ‘Kildenis Church (Site of)’ Church ( site) Circular area of which only half survives, defined by scarp SW-NE (dim. 40m) with portion of bank at NE. Vegetation change outside scarp may indicate silted fosse. No visible remains of church at ground level and no evidence of burial. Bullaun stone within enclosure.
16-9-1987

TINTERN
OS 45:10:1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yard’ Capella ante portas (lay chapel) of Tintern Abbey within rectangular graveyard, probably rebuilt in later sixteenth century by Sir Anthony Colclough with stones from the Abbey. Good quoins. Undivided nave and chancel (dims. 14.05m E-W; 7.7m N-S) surviving complete with double bellcote added separately as extension to N side of W gable. Round-headed doorway in dressed sandstone with hood-moulding towards Wend of N wall. Triple lancet east window of old red sandstone, sandstone and shale, now blocked; two-light W window and destroyed S window. Joist-holes at Wend of church may have supported a gallery. Late sixteenth-century Colclough memorial on S wall and four late seventeenth-century slabs within church. Vault, now blocked, entered from
doorway on outside of W gable. Lady’s Well c. loom to W.
27-11-1988

TOMDUFF
OS 17:5:2 ‘Killenagh Church (Site of), Grave Yd. (disused)’ Parish church of Killenagh within subrectangular graveyard. Grass-covered banks mark site of undifferentiated church (L 26m; Wth 6m). Seventeenth-century graveslab of Walsingham family within church at E end.
28-7-1987

TOMGARROW
OS 15:13:1 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Scarp (L 12m; H 0.3–0.5m) oriented ENE- WSW marks site of church within rectangular graveyard. Plain granite cross with semicircular cross-section and shaft narrowing towards intersection (H 0.67m; Wth 0.47m; max. T 0.2m), probably eighteenth century.
30-6-1987

TOMHAGGARD
OS 47:15:6 ‘Church (in ruins)’ Parish church of Tomhaggard withinrectangular graveyard. References date from early fourteenth century. Undivided nave and chancel (dims. 19.9m WNW-ESE; 6.45m NNE-SSW) with walls surviving complete apart from sections of N wall. Blocked doorway, originally pointed, in S wall and two windows in both S wall and N wall, none surviving complete. Double bellcote over ogee-headed
window in W gable and three-light cusped ogee-headed tracery window in E. Pointed aumbry on S and Easter Sepulchre on N wall at E end. Single corbels on N and S walls, 7m from E end probably for rood screen. St Anne’s Well, still venerated and where patterns were held on 26th July, and St James’ Well which had pattern on 25th July lie c. 60m to SW and adjacent to Mass house and tower
house.
15-8-1988

WHITECHURCH
OS 39:2:2 ‘Church’ Church ( site) Parish church of Whitechurch within rectangular graveyard. Described by Robert Leigh in 1684 as being in poor repair. No remains of original church. Fragment of medieval
grave-cover with raised cross and fleur-de-lis terminals, in graveyard.
11-8-1988

WILKINSTOWN
OS 36:7:3 ‘Whitechurch Grave Yard’ Church (site)’ church of Whitechurchglynn within D-shaped graveyard. No record of church or visible remains apart from rectangular granite font (dims. 0.58m x 0.51m; H 0.26m). Lady’s Well, a natural spring, lies c. 250m to S,
12-8-1988

YOLETOWN
OS 40:6:5 ‘Church (in ruins), Grave Yd.’ Parish church of Owenduff within subrectangular graveyard with curved edge S-W. Rectangular building (dims. 20m E-W; 6.32m N-S) with walls almost complete to roof level (H c. 2m) except embrasures in N and S walls. Large window in E wall robbed. W wall reduced to grass-covered foundations. All cut stone removed. Drawbar-hole in E side of doorway survives in S wall. Circular granite font within church.
15-9-1988

Churches and Graveyards of County Wexford:

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Emigration and Education Statistics, 1931, Co. Wexford

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Wexford a maritime county is in the province of Leinster. It is bounded on the North by county Wicklow on the east by St. George’s channel on the south by the Atlantic ocean and on the west by counties Waterford, Kilkanny and Carlow. It’s length from Hook Head to the boundary south-west of Arklow in county Wicklow is 55 miles and it’s breadth from Greenore Point to New Ross is 29 miles.

NAME AND FORMER DIVISIONS

The name is derived from that of the Borough of Wexford.

Croghan Kinsella is called after the ancient family of Kinsella, whose original name was Hy Kinsella and they were descended from Enna Kinsella, King of Leinster in the fourth century. The people called Hy Felimy occupied territory in county Carlow and Wexford and the branch in county Wexford took the name O’Murcada which was then anglicised to Murphy. They occupied territory corresponding to the Barony of Ballaghkeen. Another old territory, that of Fotharta also extended from Carlow into county Wexford and this gave its name to the Barony of Forth.

PHYSICAL FEATURES

There were several variations of minerals to be found in the county, copper at Kerloge near Wexford itself; lead at Caim near Enniscorthy and silver at the head of Bannow Bay.

The Wicklow Mountains extend into the northern part of county Wexford; the height in feet is given after each peak’s name here; Mount Leinster (2,610) and the Blackstairs (2,409) are on the boundary with county Carlow, Blackrock is near county Carlow but within county Wexford. Croghan Kinsella (1,987) mentioned previously is on the Wicklow border and close to this are Annagh (1,498) and Slieveboy (1,385). on the coast near Gorey is Tara (826) and Forth Mountain, near Wexford separates the south-eastern plain constituting the Baronies of Forth and Bargy from the other parts of county Wexford.

The chief headlands are Kilmichael, at the point where counties Wicklow and Wexford meet, Raven and Rosslare points mark the entrance to Wexford Harbour. Greenore marks the south end of Wexford Bay. Carnsore Point is in the extreme south-eastern point; Crossfarnoge, Clammers Point and Baginbun Head are on the west. Clammers Point and Baginbun Head mark the entrance to Bannow Bay. Hook Head is at the eastern entrance to Waterford Harbour

The Saltee Islands are off the west coast; the Keeragh islands are in Ballyteige Bay; the Bannow islands in Bannow Bay. Tuskar Rock lies south-west of Greenore Point about five miles from the coast.

The principal rivers are the Barrow which forms the western boundary with Kilkenny from its confluence with the Pollmounty river, until after receiving the waters of the Nore and the Suir and other tributaries it enters Waterford harbour. The Slaney river forms the boundary with Carlow until it enters county Wexford at Newtownbarry, and crosses the county to enter the sea at Wexford. The Cody, the Glasha, the Urrin, the Borro, the Aughnaglaur, the Derry, teh Bann, the Lask and Milltown stream are tributaries of the Slaney. The Sow river flows into Wexford harbour.

FAMILIES AND HOUSES, 1926

There were 20,607 families in the county according to the 1926 Census for Ireland, the average number in each family being 4.4. The number of ‘inhabited houses’ was 20,452, with an average of 4.7 persons to each house. The Special Inmates of Public institutions are omitted from these figures.

There were in the county 11,802 ‘Occupiers’ or ‘Heads of Families’ who were in occupation of less than five rooms, this was 57.3% of the total for the whole county. Of these 444, or 2.1% occupied one room; 1,872 or 9.1% occupied two rooms; 2,821 or 13.7%, occupied three rooms; and 6,665 or 32.3% were in occupation of four rooms.

There were 165 tenements in the county, in which the room had only one occupant at that time; 213cases where the room had two, three or four occupants; 53 cases in which there were five, six or seven occupants and 13 cases where the occupants of one room exceeded 7 in number, including 8 cases where 8 persons, 4 cases where 9 persons and 1 case where 10 persons occupied the same room.

ANALYSIS OF THE CENSUS FOR COUNTY WEXFORD, 1821-1926

Year
Males

Females

Total Pop.
1821 82,322 88,484 170,806
1831 87,995 94,718 182,713
1841 97,918 104,115 202,033
1851 86,938 93,220 180,158
1861 69,104 74,850 143,954
1871 64,199 68,467 132,666
1881 60,928 62,926 123,854
1891 54,935 56,843 111,778
1901 51,756 52,348 104,104
1911 51,568 50,705 102,273
1926 48,561 47,251 95,848

EDUCATION

In 1911, there were in the county 84,677 people aged 9 years and upwards; of these 72,271 or 85.3% could read and write; 3,123 or 3.7% could read only; and 9,283 or 11% were illiterate. As that census was the first for which the age for consideration had been raised from 5 years to 9 years, no comparison can be made with figures from earlier censuses. But – the percentage of those of five years and upwards who were unable to read and write in 1891 was 19.6%. By 1901 this figure was listed as 15.5% and in 1911 had fallen to 13.9%.

IRISH SPEAKING (1861-1911)

No.
of people
1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911

Irish only
1 1

Irish & English
240 209 512 320 1,300 2,901

Irish Total
241 210 512 320 1,300 2,901
% of
population
0.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 1.2 2.8

RELIGIONS, 1871-1926(% of population)


Religion
1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1926

Presbyterian
0.3 0.2 0.2 0.26 0.25 0.15

Church of Ireland
8.5 8.2 7.9 7.55 6.89 5.34

Roman Catholic
90.7 91.1 91.4 91.67 92.31 94.04

Methodist
0.3 0.3 0.3 0.33 0.33 0.23

Others
0.2 0.2 0.2 0.19 0.22 0.24

EMIGRATION (1861-1911)

1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911
27,053 16,088 13,106 11,966 3,960 2,900
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Presbyterian (Seceders) Synod, 1833: Congregation Index

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