Category Archives: Offaly (King’s County)

Old Irish Newspaper Abstracts

We do have some old newspaper abstracts on this website (which can be found here) and I always remember one day as I was copying some material in the National Library in Dublin laughing to myself because life had not changed that much.  The bit I was transcribing was advising people to take their keys out of their front doors because thieves were just able to walk into houses.  The thing is, the paper had been published in the 1830’s, and then it was about 2006, and only that week my mother had begun to bring her car key into the house at night instead of leaving it sitting in the car.  My mother was a medical Doctor and getting called out at night was a regular thing so leaving her key in the car saved her the trouble of having to look for it when called out.

Ireland Old News – a newspaper site giving ‘abstracts’ from Old Irish Newspapers. Came across this website earlier today (I had forgotten it!)  and I am or was the 399248th visitor since the year 2000.

Ireland Old News

We tend to forget the things that so many people have done, especially in this day and age of advanced technology.  Many of you don’t remember the days when the Irish Census returns were not on the internet, many of you don’t know about the days when you had to go to the Irish Civil Records office to get the references for births, marriages and deaths.  Today, we can get those references if they exist on the internet (for the most part).  We all forget so easily about how it was so hard back then and about what we owe to the dedicated people who transcribed material and put it up on the net for the rest of us to see.

Ireland Old News contributors:
Cathy Joynt Labath who I believe did most of the transcribing and who created the website.
Jim McNamara (and I think he told me recently it was 1999 we first met) and
Brian Magaoidh who I am still in contact with.
Alison & Kathryn who I knew through lists.
Dennis Ahearne (RIP) who contributed so much to people researching their Irish ancestry.

Some examples of the earliest years covered for any county – extracts from other newspapers are included on the site, I’ve just taken the first extract for any county as an example.

The Armagh Guardian, Dec 3rd, 1844
Cavan Herald, July 14, 1818
Ennis Chronicle (Co. Clare), 1793
Corke Journal, 1756
Londonderry Journal (Derry) 1772
Ballyshannon Herald 1832 (Donegal)
Dublin 1705
The Enniskillen Chronicle & Erne Packet 1813 (Fermanagh) Connaught Journal, Galway 1823
The Kerry Examiner, 1847
The Kildare Observer 1915
The Kilkenny Independent 1826
The Leitrim Journal & Carrick-on-Shannon Advertiser 1868 The Limerick Chronicle 1769
The Drogheda Conservative, or Meath, Louth, Monaghan and Cavan Advertser 1837
The Ballina Chronicle, 1849 (Mayo)
The Meath Chronicle 1899
The Northern Standard, & Monaghan, Cavan and Armagh Advertiser 1839
The Midland Tribune, 1901 (Offaly/King’s Co.)
Roscommon & Leitrim Gazette,, 1822
Sligo Champion, 1887
The Clonmel Advertiser, 1818 (Tipperary)
The Strabane Morning Post, 1812 (Tyrone)
Jackson’s Oxford Journal 1804 (Waterford)
Belfast Newsletter (Antrim & Down) 1749
The Bray & South Dublin Herald, 1916 (Wicklow)
The Newry Commercial Telegraph, 1813 (Co. Down)

Church of Ireland Notes, October 1845

The Church
At an ordination held in the Church of Ardbraccan by the Lord Bishop of Meath, on the 21st September 1845, the following persons were ordained; –

Deacons:
James Robert Moffatt, A.B., for the curacy of Reynagh.
John Whitelaw Scoles, A.B., Athboy
Samuel Parsons, A.B., Drumconrath
Arthur Waring, A.B., Laracor
All for the Diocese of Meath

Priests:
Peter Wilson, A.B., Curate fo Tullamoore (sic)
Hugh Gelston, A.B., curate of Enniskeen
Both for the Diocese of Meath

The Lord Bishop of Kildare held a visitation on the 23d September at Kildare ; on th 24th at Edenderry ; on the 25th at Philipstown ; on the 26th at Portarlington and no the 27th at Naas.

An ordination will soon be held (time not yet fixed) in the Cathedral of Waterford, to ordain curates for Templemore in the Diocese of Cashel ; and Tallow, Dunhill, Ardmore, Mothel in the diocese of Lismore.

The Lord Lieutenant and Council have disappropriated the parish of Aglishcormick from the precentorship of Emly and trancferred same to the ecclesiastical commissioners.

The German papers announce the death of the venerable Archdeacon of Cologne.

taken from The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Lieutenant Kirwan Stabbing, 1845

A serious accident occurred at Hounslow barracks on Sunday evening. Lieutenant-Colonel Harcourt Masters of the the Light Dragoons gave an entertainment to his brother officers in celebration of his recent promotion from the rank of major. After dinner the officers generally amused themselves with wrestling, and eventually with fencing, and Quarter-master Tarleton received a wound in the side from the sword of Lieutenant Kirwan. The surgeons of the Regiment immediately attended the wounded officer who was considered to be in a precarious state.

Lieutenant Kirwan was next day, by the military authorities at the Horse Quarters placed under arrest. Quartermaster Tarleton’s deposition was taken in writing by a magistrate and afterwards, the evidence of Mr. Frogley, the surgeon as to the nature of the wound and the state of the wounded man. A warrant was then issued for the apprehension of Lieutenant Martin Kirwan on a charge of cutting and wounding. Mr. Frogley, the surgeon, informed the local magistrates that he was unable to pronounce the wounded officer out of danger. Lieutenant-Colonel Daly expressed his readiness to enter into any amount of bail for the appearance of Lieutenant Kirwan. The Bench said the charge was of so serious a nature that they could not take bail, and it was their duty to remand the prisoner to Tothill-fields Bridewell until the fate of Quartermaster Tarleton can be ascertained. The prisoner accompanied by some of the officers of the regiment was then removed by a police officer in a fly to Tothill-fields Bridewell.

From a source on which reliance may be placed the following version of the occurrence has been obtained : – During the entertainment given to the officers on the evening of Sunday, between eleven and twelve o’clock, some words arose between Lieut. Kirwan and another officer, when Lieut. Kirwan left the room in a great passion, declaring he would cross swords with the officer who had offended him. Quarer master Tarleton followed him to his room, and endeavoured to prevent him leaving his apartment with a drawn sword in his hand, when by some means the unfortunate occurrence took place. Lieut. Kirwan was intoxicated at the time, and during some wrestling which took place after dinner, had been thrown twice with great violence on his head. The officer between whom and Lieut. Kirwan the disagreement had taken place was Captain T. Fane of the same regiment. Quarter-master Tarleton is a married man and has a family of three children. His father was Quartermaster of the 18th Light Dragoons for many years. He has since been declared out of danger and Lieutenant Kirwan has been admitted to bail.

Taken from : The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Military News, October 1845

Head-quarters of the 49th have arrived in Athlone from Dublin.

The 57th or ‘Die-Hards’ are ordered home from India after 2(?1) years service.

Captain Ormsby has taken command of the Royal Depot at Nenagh, Major Deane having left for Gibralter.

A son of Richard Sadlier, Esq., of Scalaheen, Co. Tipperary, is promoted to a company in the 41st, quartered in Dublin.

The 73d embarked at Cove for Giberalter on Saturday, on board the Apollo t=troop ship.

The entire of the services companies of the 54th are now in Cork, and will embark in a few days for Giberalter. On the embarkation of the 54th, the 34th from Fermoy will move into Cork, to embark for Corfu.

The 11th Hussars under Lord Cardigan, move from Dublin to Newbridge in a few days.

Lord Lieutenant Mountcharles, Scots Greys Capt. Mildmay, of the Bays and Captain Cathcart, 11th Hussars dined with the Lord Lieutenant on Tuesday evening.

Major General Wyndham has returned to Dublin from leave, and takes command of the garrison.

Lieutenant Carey, 44th, succeeds Captain Lynch, 57th at Omagh, on the recruiting service.

The officers and men of the 24th Regiment have, with a generous feeling of sympathy, ubscribed one days pay for relief of the may sufferers of fire at Quebec.

Two privates of the 25th, who deserted from Tralee with £10 belonging to Lieutenant Davis, Depot Paymaster, were arrested in Cork this week.

Stations of the British Army, 1845

Stations of the British Army
On the 1st October, 1845

Where two places are mentioned, the last named is that at which the Depot of the Regiment is stationed.

(In order to make things as easy as possible for you, I have taken all groups which have a place in Ireland mentioned, going to or coming from and placed them in the first table, but I have still left the group listed in the main table)

Cavalry
2d Dragoon Gds – Longford, for Dublin
3d do, – Ballincollig
2d do, Dublin
6th do (Inniskilling) Birmingham
8th do, Longford
11th do, Dublin
13th Lt. Dragoons, Cahir

Infantry
1st Foot
(1st batt.) Gibralter ; Nenagh
5th Enniskillen
6th Mullingar
7th Barbadoes ; Naas
15th Ceylon ; Waterford
16th Buttevant
19th Corfu ; Carlow
24th Limerick
26th Belfast
30th Castlebar
32d Athlone
33rd New Brunswick ; Clonmel
34th Fermoy
38th Giberalter ; Derry
41st Dublin
44th Dublin
46th Canada ; Armagh
48th Jamaica ; Kilkenny
49th Dublin
54th Cork
64th Dublin
66th Giberalter ; Clare Castle
67th Dublin
70th Dublin
72d Giberalter ; Templemore
73d Cork ; Spike Island
75th Birr
77th Jamaica ; Templemore
79th Bombay ; belturbet
82nd Canada ; Kinsale
83d Limerick
85th st. Vincent ; Newry
88th Malta ; Boyle
93rd Montreal ; Newbridge
95th Ceylon ; Tralee

Rifle Brigade
1st batt. Corfu ; Dublin

END of copied section. Below is the complete list as it was published

Cavalry
1st Life Gds – Hyde Park
2d Life Gds – Windsor
1st Dragoon Gds – Exeter
2d Dragoon Gds – Longford, for Dublin
3d do, – Ballincollig
4th do – Edinburgh
5th do – Nottingham
6th do – Manchester
7th do – Cape of Good Hope ; Maidstone
1st Dragoons, Dundalk
2d do, Dublin
3d Lt. do, Bengal ; Maidstone
4th do, Hounslow
6th do (Inniskilling) Birmingham
7th Hussars, Ipswich
8th do, Longford
9th Lancers, Bengal ; Maidstone
10th Hussars, York
11th do, Dublin
12th Lancers, Coventry
13th Lt. Dragoons, Cahir
14th do, Bombay ; Maidstone
15th Hussars, Madras ; Maidstone
16th Lancers, Bengal ; Maidstone
17th do, Brighton

Infantry
1st Grenadier Guards
(1st) Wellington Barracks;
(2nd batt.) Windsor;
(3d batt) St. George’s Barracks

Coldstream Guards
(1st batt.) Portman street
(2d batt.) Tower

Scots Fusilier Guards
(1st batt.) St. john’s Wood
(2d batt.) Winchester

1st Foot
(1st batt.) Gibralter ; Nenagh
(second batt.) Barbadoes ; Glasgow

2nd Bombay ; Chatham
3rd Winchester
4th Madras, Chatham
5th Enniskillen
6th Mullingar
7th Barbadoes ; Naas
8th Portsmouth
9th Bengal ; Chatham
10th Bengal ; Chatham
11th N.S. Wales ; Chatham
12th Mauritius ; Isle Wight
13th Walmer Castle
14th Canada ; Plymouth
15th Ceylon ; Waterford
16th Buttevant
17th Bombay ; Chatham
18th China ; Chatham
19th Corfu ; Carlow
20th Bermuda ; Isle ofWight
Reserve batt. Bermuda
21st Madras ; Chatham
22nd Bombay ; Chatham
23rd Trinidad ; Isle of Wight
24th Limerick
25th Madras ; Chatham
26th Belfast
27th Cape of Good Hope ; Guernsey
28th Bombay ; Chatham
29th Bengal ; Chatham
30th Castlebar
31st Bengal ; Chatham
32d Athlone
33rd New Brunswick ; Clonmel
34th Fermoy
35th Mauritius ; Charles Fort
36th Newcastle on Tyne
37th Newport S. Wales
38th Giberalter ; Derry
39th Bengal ; Chatham
40th Bengal ; Chatham
41st Dublin
42d Malta ; Isle of Wight
43rd Halifax ; Dover
44th Dublin
45th : 1st batt. Cape of Good Hope ; Isle of Wight
45th : Reserve batt. Ditto
46th Canada ; Armagh
47th Chester
48th Jamaica ; Kilkenny
49th Dublin
50th Bengal ; Chatham
51st Van Diemen’s Land ; Chatham
52nd Quebec ; Brecon
53rd Bengal ; Chatham
54th Cork
55th Devenport
56th Bury
57th Madras ; Chatham
58th New South Wales ; Chatham
59th Leeds
60th 1st batt. Bombay ; Chatham
60th 2nd batt. Quebec ; Paisley
61st Bengal ; Chatham
62d Bengal ; Chatham
63d Madras ; Chatham
64th Dublin
65th Chatham
66th Giberalter ; Clare Castle
67th Dublin
68th Portsmouth
69th Weedon
70th Dublin
71st Antigua ; Isle of Wight
72d Giberalter ; Templemore
73d Cork ; Spike Island
74th Portsmouth
75th Birr
76th Manchester
77th Jamaica ; Templemore
78th Bombay ; Chatham
79th Bombay ; belturbet
80th Bengal ; Chatham
81st Canada ; jersey
82nd Canada ; Kinsale
83d Limerick
84th Madras ; chatham
85th st. Vincent ; Newry
86th Bombay ; Chatham
87th Aberdeen
88th Malta ; Boyle
89th Quebec ; Carlisle
90th Ceylon ; Hull
91st Cape of Good Hope ; Isle of wight
91st Reserve batt. Do
92nd Edinburgh
93rd Montreal ; Newbridge
94th Aden ; Chatham
95th Ceylon ; Tralee
96th New South Wales ; Chatham
97th Corfu ; Isle of Wight
98th China ; Chatham
99th New South Wales ; Chatham

Rifle Brigade
1st batt. Corfu ; Dublin
2nd batt. HalifaxN.S. ; Isle of Wight

Colonial Corps
South Newfoundland, V.C. Newfoundland
1st W. I Reg. – Demerara Sierra leone
2nd do – Jamaica, Sierra Leone
3d do – Sierra Leone
Cape Mount Riflemen Cape Good Hope
Ceylon Rifles – Ceylon
Royal malta Fencibles – Malta
Royal St. Helena Regiment – St. Helena
Royal Canadian Rifle Regiment – Canada
Published in The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Flax Improvement Society and the End of the Ballinasloe Show, 1845

Meeting of the Flax Improvement Society
Pursuant to public notice, a meeting of the Flax Improvement Society of Ireland was held today in the court house at one o’clock. Nearly all the nobility and gentry in the town were present. The Earl of Erne took the chair.

His lordship called upon the secretary to read the report of the society’s proceedings for the last year, and observed, that there were two or three gentlemen present who would be happy to answer any questions asked them regarding the cultivation of flax.

Mr. Wardham then read the report, which was regarded as most satisfactory.

Mr. Walker from the co. Donegal, who cultivates annually fifty to seventy acres of flax, came forward at the request of the noble chairman to state the result of hi practice. He said that after many years experience he found that there was a clear profit of at least £20 per acre upon an average crop, after the payment of all expenses, from five and a half packs of seed. His rotation of crops was potatoes, wheat, flax and clover. It was a crop which gave more employment to the poor than any other, and at a season when the country people were not otherwise engaged, and it was by no means an exhausting one unless to itself. His opinion therefore was that it should not be sown a second time in the same land for a period of seven years, and when cut, it should be, if possible, laid on new cut meadow land. As regarded seed, he considered that it was best when taken before the flax was perfectly ripe, and its being allowed to ripen did not at all injure the fibre (applause)

Some very interesting conversation then took place respecting the merits of home and foreign flax for seed. The prevailing opinion appeared to be in favour of the native article. Several cultivators, from different parts of the country, stated it to be so from their experience, and observed that it was almost always the successful seed when offered for competition with foreign seeds at local shows.

Ballinasloe, Friday
The proceedings of the show closed last evening, or more properly speaking this moring, with the usual ball, and a more splendid affair, both as regards numbers and respectability, never took place in any provincial town in Ireland, or, perhaps I might say, even in the metropolis. The evening was most unpropitious. No less than five hundred persons promenaded the rooms, one fourth of whom, at least, were members of the aristocratic families in town.
The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Royal Agricultural Improvement Society of Ireland Exhibition, 1845

Royal Agricultural Improvement Society of Ireland
Ballinasloe, Thursday evening.
This day, the exhibition terminated, and under circumstances rendered most unfavourable by the state of the weather. Rom dawn till evening the rain almost unceasingly poured down in torrents. The show-yard has been completely flooded, and consequently quite deserted – and with scarcely an exception, all kinds of business, unless, perhaps that of the hotel keepers, is at a standstill. Several sales by auction of prize ad other cattle, of farming implements, &c., fixed for the day have, unless in one instances, where a few inferior animals were disposed of, been postponed, it being found impossible to proceed with them under the circumstances. Now that I have had time to ascertain what several here with whom I have conversed think of the exhibition, I can state that it is generally considered as having proved rather a disappointment, at least of the very expectations, which the public had been led to entertain on the subject. Had there not been so much talked and written by anticipation concerning it, the affair might have given much more satisfaction, but so magnified, so exaggerated were the accounts by anticipation, that though a fair average exhibition certainly, yet it failed to realize the notion as to its unparalleled splendour which had been thus excited. Several lodging keepers also suffered from the same cause – the exorbitant prices demanded by them leaving additional apartments which they had provided for the splendid occasion altogether on their hands.

Mr. Hugh Ferguson, veterinary surgeon of Dublin, delivered a very able lecture today in the court-house, before a crowded audience, on the principle functions of animal organization, and the prenset epidemic among cattle.

The banquet took place this evening at half-past five o’clock, in the new Agricultural Hall. About five hundred persons sat down to dinner, which was served under the same management as the entertainment on the previous day.

At five o’clock the chair was taken by his Grace the Duke of Leinster, and the vice chair by Lord Clonbrock.

The same toasts proposed last evening were again given and acknowledged by
The Earl of Devon, Lord Clonbrock, Sir Percy Nugent, N. Redington, M.P ; the Earl of Erne, Mr. Hugh Watson, Mr. Torr (an English gentleman), Mr. John Grey, Lord Castlemaine, Mr. Hugh Grey (who was presented with the silver challenge cup for the second time), Mr. George Macartney, of Lowther Lodge ; Admiral Trench, Mr. john Wayne, Mr. J. L. Napar of Loughcrew ; Sir John Bourke, Bart. ; and Mr. Denis Kelly ; after which the company separated at 11 o’clock.

There was nothing in any of the speeches to make their publication of interest, as they were almost perfectly similar to those delivered at the annual dinner on Tuesday.
The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

The Army: Promotions and Exchanges, 1845

The Army
Promotions and Exchanges
16th Light Dragoons – Surgeon James Burt from the 78th Foot, to be Surgeon, vice Sandham promoted ; Assistant Surgeon John Edward Stephens., M.D., from the 63d to be Assistant Surgeon, vice Pilleau appointed to the Staff.

18th Regiment of Foot – Ensign Henry James to be Lieutenant by purchase, vice Bloomfield who retires ; John Bushby, Gent., to be Ensign by purchase, vice James.

28th Foot – Supernumerary Staff Assistant Surgeon George Augustus Frederic Shelton, A.M. M.B., to be Assistant Surgeon, vice Alexander, promoted in the 78th Foot.

44th Foot – Lieutenant Hugh Hanson John Massy to be Captain by purchase, vice Ballard, who retires ; Ensign William Hammer to be Lieutenant by purchase, vise(sic) Massy ; Edward Ogle Streatfield, Gent, to be Ensign by purchase, vice Hammer.

63d Foot – Assistant Staff Surgeon John Hardie Gray to be Assistant Surgeon, vice Stephens, appointed to 16th Light Dragoons.

65th Foot – Capt Wm. Johnson (the 2d) from half pay Unattached to be Captain, vice B…vet (letters smudged, illegible) Major Wm. Snow, who exchanges.

78th Foot – Assistant Surgeon Archibald Alexander from the 28th Foot, to be Surgeon, vice Burt, appointed to the 16th Light Dragoons.

Rifle Brigade – Assistant Surgeon john Liddle Robinson, from the staff to be Assistant Surgeon, vice Downes, who exchanges.

Hospital Staff – Surgeon Backshall Lane Sandham, M.D., from the 16th Light Dragoons to be Staff Surgeon of the 1st class, vice Thomas Clark who retires on half pay ; Assistant Surgeon Henry Pilleau, from the 16th Light Dragoons, to be Assistant Surgeon to the Forces, vice Gray, appointed to the 63d Foot ; Assistant Surgeon Henry Downes,M.D., from the Rifle Brigade to be Assistant Surgeon to the Forces, vice Robinson, who exchanges.
The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

The King’s Co. Chronicle, Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Electioneering on DIT
It is currently reported that H. A. Cole., Esq,. M. P., will seek the suffrages of the county at next election, and that the popular Paul Dane, Esq., descendant of an old Enniskillener, who was provost and commandant when the town was beleagured by Jame’s forces, will be the Representative of our loyal borough. – “Fermanagh Reporter

Remedy for the Distemper in Cattle.
Six grains of arsenic in four ounces of white sugar, to be pounded very fine for an hour – dose, a teaspoonful every three hours. After losing fifty head of cattle, I was induced to try this, and have not lost any since, except one that was too far gone when I commenced, and had been previously treated with severe remedies. – “Correspondent of the Limerick Chronicle

Two Thousand year old
Some mummy wheat supposed to be two thousand years old, sown by Col. North at Wroxton, has produced upwards of forty stems from each grain, each of them bearing an ear.

Mr. O’Connell arrived at Limerick on Friday night from Dublin, and left next morning for Killarney, to dine with the Repealers on this day (Monday) and tomorrow to enjoy a stag hunt on the Lakes. There are four reporters in Mr. O’Connell’s suite.
(Mr. Daniel O’Connell)

We are informed by the Galway Vindicator that the triennial election of commissioners for that town terminated on Wednesday, and that the entire body are pledged to Repeal.

The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Mr. Sergeant Murphy, Note

Mr. Sergeant Murphy – We understand that Mr. Sergeant Murphy’s retiring address to his constituents will appear in the course of this week. It was deferred to this period in the hope that he would have been enabled personally to communicate to them his intentions ; but very urgent professional engagements will prevent his visiting Cork for some time “Cork Reporter”
The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845