Category Archives: Tipperary

Tithe Rent Charges, National Teachers Act, 1887

Tithe Rent Charges

The Clerk read the resolution of the Nenagh Board asking to have tithe rent charges applied to local rather than to Imperial purposes. Mr. Maunsell proposed the adoption of the resolution. Mr. Hewson said it was a very good and proper resolution. At the time of the dissolution of the Protestant Church in Ireland the tithe rent charge was seized by the Government. They had all to pay it to the Government the same as they did before. It was o be spent in the parishes where the clergymen resided, and the butcher and the baker got their portion of it, but now, it was carried off and they did not know what was done with it.
The resolution was adopted.

The National Teacher’s Act.

A letter was read from the Commissioners of National Education, asking for £70.4s.6d in addition to the £447 already received to complete the payments of the National School Teachers.

Mr. Hewson: I move that the communication be marked read
The Clerk: You might as well say at once that the Board can’t pay it, it is heavily in debt.

Garrenbeg Murder, Co. Tipperary, 1845

Murder – Tipperary

On Tuesday evening, the 30th, ult., between the hours of eight and nine o’clock, four fellows, all of whom were armed with bludgeons, entered the house of a man named Sheedy, of Garrenbeg, about seven miles from Nenagh.  Michael Hill, the victim in this case and others were sitting around the fire at this time. On the party entering, they threw something on the fire which immediately darkened the house; they then commenced belabouring unfortunate Hill till they left him as they conceived dead.  On the first blow being given, the persons who were sitting round the fire ran way. The deceased afterwards, removed to his own house, which is next door to the one in which he had been beaten, and where he expired the following morning. The cause assigned for this daring act is, that the deceased refused to allow his brother marry a young woman with whom an intimacy existed.

On Thursday, an inquest was held on the body by James Carroll, Esq., coroner. Joseph Tabuteau, Esq., S.M., ; Captain Pollock, R.M., ; and John Lewis, Esq., S.L., were present. There was but one witness examined, who deposed to nothing more than what is narrated in the preceding paragraph. Edward Kittison, of Nenagh, Esq., M.D., made a post-mortem examination on the body of the deceased, and found the left side of the head completely smashed in, and the left arm very much contused ; and which must have caused almost instantaneous death. The jury returned a verdict of willful murder against some persons at present unknown. Four fellows were taken up on suspicion, and were under examination the greater portion of the day, at the police Barrack of Killoscully, before Mr. Tabuteau and Captain Pollock. On the following day, they were committed and lodged in Nenagh Gaol – ‘Nenagh Guardian
published in The King’s Co. Chronicle
Vol. 1 No. 3
Wednesday, Oct 6th, 1845

Some Clonmel Newspapers, 1800

A GLANCE THROUGH THEIR PAGES
by B. J. LONG.

Through the kindness of a correspondent, I have been permitted to inspect a small bundle of old Clonmel newspapers. They are for the most part small sheets something larger than Tit-Bits, and the quaint style in which they are “got out” gives one a good idea of the primitive methods of journalism prevailing in the old days as compared with the fine, newsy, broad sheets now so familiar to the public. Let us take a glance through the faded pages of these old records of the past .

The first in chronological order is a small rough sheet, the Clonmel Gazette, which had the rather comprehensive sub-title of Hibernian Advertiser. It was printed in this town on March 17, 1792, being the 100th number, vol. xxi., so the journal must have been a good while in existence at that time. It was printed by Collins & Heaslop, but the imprint does not state where the office was located.

The virtues of advertising in those early days were not apparently very much appreciated, as only two and a half of the sixteen columns were covered with advertisements. Six columns are devoted to the prooceedings in the Irish Parliament, then sitting in College Green, Mr. Bagwell appearing in several of the disscussions. Then follows a column and a half of foreign news, and three columns of English news. The only item of local intelligence is a paragraph about the accidental burning to death of a little girl, but the advertising announcements are newsy in their own way. John Smithwick, of Lackin, announces that he lost a pocket-book containing four money bills for various sums in Tipperary town; David Higgins, of Marlfield, has an announcement about new garden seeds; Robert Dudley announces his retirement from hardware busiiness opposite the court-house, and that his son succeeds him; Theobald and John Butler advertise Arbor Hill house and demesne to be set; Michael St. John, apothecary and druggist, Clonmel, announces receipt of a large stock of drugs and medicines from Bristol; George Cole, Clonmel, offers £1200 for a well circumstanced estate between Clonmel and Tipperary; William Baker, Raheen states he wants some land near Clonmel. The Royal Mail Coach Company invite tenders for the building of a coach house in Clonmel. The Advertisement stated that Richard Jones had the plans, and the tenders would be received by William Phillips. In the fourth page appears a long letter from Napper Tandy, then outlawed, in which he protests against the illegality of the methods by which he was being prosecuted by the English agents. The market notes have no reference to Clonmel, but the Waterford prices given show that butter was 64s. per cwt.; fresh lumps, 13d. per lb.; wheat, 25s. per barrel; barley, 9s. to 13s. per barrel; oats, 8d. to 10d. per stone; “malt,” 17s. per barrel; beef, 2 1/2 d. per lb. ; mutton, 2 1/2 d. to 3 1/2 d. per lb.; pork, 24s. per cwt.; potatoes, 2 1/2 d. per stone; coals, 2s. 8 1/2 d. per barrel. It will be interesting to compare these with the present prices.

Another copy of the Same paper, issued in the same month, contains a report of proceedings in the Irish House of Parliament when the Lords passed a Bill relieving Catholics of certain restrictions from which they suffered. We notice that Lord Donoughmore delivered a remarkable speech before the Bill was passed, emmphasising the unanimity that prevailed regarding the measure, and resenting the contumely that a certain noble lord saw fit to cast on Catholics. A list of sheriffs showed that John Carden, of Cardenton, was sheriff of County Tipperary, and John Congrew (jun.), of Landscape, sheriff of Waterford County. Nowadays lotteries, even the simplest, are illegal, but in 1792 the State had a regular system of lotteries, and the Gazette gives the winning numbers for a week, in which the prizes range from £50 to £5000. Tenders used to be taken at the Castle for the sale of the lottery tickets, and the highest bidder was successful.

Three paragraphs appear under the heading Clonmel. One describes the accidental shooting of a workman in Mr. Connell’s distillery at Fethard. Another points out that all the county magistrates are required to return information, &c., ten days before the opening of the Commission. A quaintly-worded notice appears from the mayor, Stephen Moore, regarding an assize of bread. He states that the price of wheat is £2, 0s. 6d. per quarter, with an allowance to the baker of 8s. on the wheaten and 9s. on the household. The weight of the penny loaf is fixed at II oz. 4 dr., and the sixpenny loaf at 4 lb. 4 oz. per loaf. The mayor declares he will not suffer any bread to be made, baked, or sold, except by a registered baker and marked with his name. An announcement regarding the Lent Assizes showed that the Munster circuit included Waterford, Tipperary, Limerick, Cork, and Kerry, the justices mentioned by the Gazette being Baron Hamilton and Justice Kelly. There is no price mentioned on the Gazette, but each copy bears the impression of the penny duty stamp.

The next paper we take up is the Clonmel Journal, a little fourpenny bi-weekly, published by S. Collins, Clonmel. It is dated July I3, I800. The first announcement it contains is a report of a county meeting held to congratulate the king on his escape from a recent attempt made on his life. P. Archer Butler, High Sheriff, presided, and those present included several Protestant bishops, Lord Mountcashel, Lord Landaff, Lord Donoughmore, Lord Matthew, M.P. for the county; John, William, and Richard Bagwell, John Toler, Francis Hely-Hutchinson, John C. Carden, Stephen Moore, William and Charles Riall, and George and Charles Goold. Needless to say, the resolutions come to were of the usual fulsome type, so characteristic of gentlemen of the grand jury class down to recent times.

There would appear to be acute distress prevailing in Clonmel in 1800, for the journal announces the receipt of £1336. for supplying the poor of the borough with meal at cheap prices. William Fennell, of Caher Abbey, publishes a rather bitter reply to some allegations which he alleged were made against him that poison was mixed with the meal Mr. Fennell was supplying to the poor. A heavy reward is offered for the conviction of parties who burned the mills of Messrs. Byrne & French at Carrick-on-Suir, a firm which had an agent named E. Budd vending their goods in Peter Street, Clonmel. Richard Moore was mayor of the borough, and according to an assize of bread held by him the penny loaf weighed 4 oz., the sixpenny I lb. 8 oz., and the shilling loaf 3 lbs. I oz. The law intelligence contains a report of the trial of two Tipperary men in Dublin for having in their possession a twenty-guinea bank-note taken when the mails were robbed near Carrick. They were acquitted. The Clonmel notes deal with movement of troops locally and the market prices. As usual, most of the paper is taken up with foreign and English news. The Journal of October I, 1800, contains little of local interest except the fact that Stephen Collins was sworn in mayor, with Richard Moore and Cornelius Pyne bailiffs. James Walshe, merchant, Clonmel, announces receipt of a “fashionable assortment” of hardware and other goods. The Journal of September 1800 contains an advertisement stating that the mayor and bailiffs would receive proposals for the tolls and customs of the town, and also for the fairs. These tolls have long ago been abolished.

The next paper is the Clonmel Herald of January 1808. It announces a ball’and supper at the Courtthouse, Clonmel, the subscriptions being 4s. 4d. for nonnsubscribing ladies, and 7s. 7d. for non-subscribing gentlemen. Isaac Jacob, Thomas Taylor, and Joseph Grubb Benjamin advertise Suirville Mills to be let. Samuel Morton intimates that he will let a dwelling house and distillery in Johnson Street, also lands of Boreenduff at Fethard Road- “about half a mile from the town.” Barley was I8s. per barrel; coals, 7s. 7d. per barrel; butter, Is.I0d. per lb.; beef, 4 1/2 d. per lb.; mutton, 6d. per lb. In the Herald for January 20, 1808, reference is made to the disscharge of workers from employment “owing to the decline of what was formerly our staple tradeewoollen manufacture”; and the hope was expressed that steps would be taken to revive the industry. How history repeats itself! A movement was on foot lately to start a similar industry. A long announcement is published by ” Protestant noblemen, gentlemen, and freeholders” in favour of Catholic Emancipation. The sheriff of Limerick County offers £2000 reward for the apprehension of ten persons from Pallas, Coologne, and Clashbone.

We then pass on to the Clonmel Chronicle of June 1855, published for Mr. E. Woods by J. A. Quinlan. The price was 5d., and it bore the penny stamp duty, which was repealed some time later. It contains a good deal of Crimean War news sent ” by magnetic telegraph.” Peter Banfield announced his corn-mills in Johnson and Charles Streets for sale. It also appears from this paper that Higginsons had ;1 drapery establishment at 34 Bagwell Street, S. Jacob and sisters had a grocery shop in same street, while Scott brothers had a millinery establishment at 102 Main Street. A new butter market was opened in Dowd’s Lane. George G. Prettie was Clerk of the Peace, and W. H. Deane, County Surveyor.

The report of the Clonmel guardians’ meeting showed that 1522 persons were in the workhouse, a large number compared with the 340 now relieved there. The average cost was 1s. 7 1/2 d.: 501 paupers were chargeable to Clonmel. Mr. John Bagwell presided, and the other Guardians present were – Colonel Phipps, the mayor, Stephen Moore, J. J. Shee, coroner, William Davis, Thomas Cantwell, William Mahony, P. Daniell, Ald. C. Bianconi, and Ald. Hackett. In Cashel workhouse there were 1205 inmates, and Tipperary 849. The Chronicle of August 1855 contains a protest by Earl Donoughmore against the expenses of 75 police unjustly charged to South Tipperary. Our county then had I030 police. We are also informed a Lieutenant O’Ryan walked from the Barracks, Clonmel, to the Market House, Caher, and back, SIXTEEN IRISH MILES, WITHIN FOUR HOURS, and won a wager. In the Chronicle of September 12, 1855, appears a memorial from the inhabitants of Clonmel in favour of the adoption of the Towns Improvement Act. The citizens who signed the memorial were – Patrick Purcell, Michael Woods, Patrick Dwyer, John O’Neill, John Wright, Robert Prendergast, Patrick Moloney, William Skehan, Patrick O’Neill, John Prendergast, John Murphy, Patrick Hickey, Walter Keating, Thomas Brett, P. Corcoran, T.C. ; James Gill, J. Hackett, Alderman, J.P. ; William Ryan, T.C.; William Byrne, Alderman; John Quinn, Patt Casey, T.C. Ma1comsons, Hughes, and the Manor flour mills were then in full working order.

The bundle of papers also includes the Clonmel Advertiser, a small paper published by the late Mr. E. McDonald, foreman of the Free Press, who took over the plant of that paper from the proprietors, and who had his office in Abbey Street.

Taken from My Clonmel Scrapbook
Compiled & Edited James White
Second 1000 ; Published E. Downey & Co., Waterford ; 1907 ; No. ISBN

Civic Annals, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary

CIVIC ANNALS : Clonmel, Co. Tipperary

Clonmel, it has been said, may be considered in its corporate capacity as of the prescriptive class of borough endowed with civic rights anterior to written authority. The first event on record in connection with the town carries us back to the period of the invasion of Ireland by Henry II. Henry, through the submission of the Irish princes and governors of the south, soon became established in his newly acquired authority. As he marched from Waterford to Lismore, he parcelled out the principal estates to certain of his valiant knights, who had proved his more devoted adherents. To one of these – Otho de Grandison – was given all Tipperary. One of Otho’s earliest acts was the erection of Clonmel into a borough, according to the powers conferred upon him.

At a Parliament held in Dublin A.D. 1300, to which all the boroughs of Ireland were required to send representatives, Clonmel appears as “from the borough of De Grandison at Clonmel,” on which occasion its representatives voted an assessment upon it for the service of the State to the amount of twelve marks. In the reign of Edward II., “The Provost and Commonality of Clonmel” sued the king to relieve them from some difficulties; and in the year 1313 a charter of amercement was granted, which proved that, whatever they had done amiss, the royal favour was not forfeited.

In 1329 the King’s Escheator was commanded to take possession of all the lands and tenements which had belonged to Otho de Grandison, then deceased (2nd Edward III). This seizure by the Royal Escheator was consequent upon the existing state of tenures, whereby, upon any alienations, a license should issue from the Crown to legalise them. The alienation in this case was from Peter, heir male of Otho de Grandison, to Maurice, son of Thomas Earl of Desmond, then a minor, and was duly certified in Chancery.

Edward III. seems to have held the ancient and loyal borough of Clonmel in his especial favour, for we find from the Patent Rolls that on the 20th January, in the forty-fifth year of his reign, he granted “to the Provost and Commons’ of the town” a charter giving them full license to elect annually a sovereign from, their co-burgesses; a privilege which, it is to be innferred, had formerly been exercised by the De Grandison family. The manor and lordship of Clonmel soon after fell to the Butlers, and at a time when the sovereign was showering honours thickly upon them.

In Morrins’ Patent and Close Rolls (p. 376) we find, what is termed “The Governing Charter of Clonmel,” dated July 5th, in the sixth year of the reign of James 1. (1608). It recites as follows :-
“That the town of Clonmel was an ancient Borough, situate in the Liberty of Tipperary and Waterford – fortified from the time of its foundation by forts and walls, erected by English lieges : springing from an ancient race using English habits, customs, and laws – That the inhabitants duly rendered laudable service to Englishmen, with the loss of their blood and life. – That the town was contiguous to the Suire, with a port convenient for navigation, having a Bridge long and nigh; fortified with towers, castles, and bulwarks; in the reparation of which the inhabitants had expended considerable sums of money, but now, in consequence of the poverty of the inhabitants, had become ruined and decayed; and the residents, in consequence of the Plague and the Burning of the Town, are reduced to great poverty, and likely to remain so unlesse aid be speedilie given.- And as the town is convenient for the King’s Commissioners, Justices, and Army.- In consideration of the fidelite and obedience of the inhabitants which they have manifestly exhibited :-

“HIS MAJESTY GRANTS

” ‘ That the town and suburbs and the entire extent of land and water on every side within the ancient limits BE FOR EVER A FREE BOROUGH INCORPORATE, consisting of a Mayor, Two Bailiffs, Free Burgesses and Commons (23 Burgesses) – of whom the Mayor and Bailiffs shall be three. License was also given to appoint a man learned in the law to be Recorder of the Town: a Clerk of the Tholsell : a Sword-Bearer: three Sergeants-at-Mace, and so many inferior officers as shall he necessary for the service of the town. – To have a Common Seale, engraved with such inscription as to them shall seem expedient, to seal all Writings, Evidences, and Muniments of the Town; and another seale or signet wherewith to seale all Testimonials, Certificates, and Attachments.

” ‘They may have a Guild Mercatory [Chamber of Commerce], and a hall appurtenant. No foreign merchant shall sell by retail any merchandise in the town without special license unlesse the wares be bought or sold from day to day at the usual times and places.

” ‘They may have two markets, namely – on every Tuesday and Saturday, and the Mayor shall be Clerk : They shall have the Assize of Bread, Wine, and Beer, and the Mayor may wear such robes and garments as the Mayor of Waterford.

” ‘They shall have a Quay or Wharf in the town upon the Suire, and take from each ship coming to load or unload, for the maintenance of the quay, 4d. for every ton weight imported or exported: and they shall have the pontage or custom of the Bridge as they anciently had without molestation or impediment. All their goods and chattels shall be free of lastage, pontage, passage, pavage, anchorge, quayage, gravage, and wharfage, in all cities and towns, in as ample a manner as the citizens of Kilkenny.

” ‘They may acquire Manors, Lands, and Tenements; Advowsons and Services of the annual value of £20 : and they shall have all waifs and strays occurring in the Town, and may quietly enjoy all their lands, tenements, houses, mills, orchards, and pastures – the ancient burgage of the town. – July 5th, 6 James I.'”

This charter continued in operation until James II. forced its surrender by quo warranto! An “Exempliification” of the charter of 1608 was subsequently granted by King William III, and taken out at the instance of John Moore, Esq., Mayor of Clonmel. It is this “Exemplification” which is at present to be found amongst the records of our municipal corporation.

There is an old tradition that the victims of the violent epidemic which occurred here were interred in The old burial-ground of St. Nicholas, in the south suburbs of the town, and near the Goaten Bridge. The ancient name of the place – now all but forgotten – was Teampull a plau, or “The Church of the Plague.”

About a mile from Clonmel, in the south-eastern suburbs of the town, there has existed from time immemorial an unfailing chalybeate spring, protected by a low, arched building, resembling a crypt. This once famous Spa – which, in the olden time, drew many a wanderer in search of health from distant parts of Ireland – stands upon a portion of the corporate estate, now held under lease by Mr. Bagwell, of Marlfield, with, however, all public rights reserved. A stone tablet, built into the wall of the old structure, with its ancient-looking inscription, introduces us to one of the earliest “Mayors of Clonmel.” There were Sovereigns who governed this time-honoured and historic borough for three hundred years before; but Mayors, from the days of James 1., ruled with greater power, and represented a higher degree of civic dignity. The inscription runs simply thus :-
WILLIAM STANLEY
MAYOR OF CLONMEL
1631(1)

In 1667, the plan of Sir Peter Pett for introducing the woollen manufacture into Ireland was carried into effect by the Duke of Ormond, then Lord-Lieutenant; and, in order to provide a sufficient number of workmen, five hundred families of the Walloons were invited over from Canterbury to settle here. The manufacture continued to flourish for some time, but at length fell into decay, in consequence of the prohibitory statutes passed by the English Parliament soon after the Revolution. It is now in part revived in this neighbourhood. At Ballymacarberry, about seven miles from Clonmel, the Nire Vale Woollen Factory is worked by a Dublin company. Its romantic situation is greatly admired; and visitors will rejoice to hear the whirl of machinery and the hum of cheerful industry mingling with the mU,sical flow of the river. Mr. J. Mulcahy has another woollen factory, also at full work, adjoining Ardfinnan Castle.

Returning to Clonmel, we are not altogether devoid of manufacturing industry. Free trade and the importation of foreign grain levelled a blow at the manufacture of flour, and many of our large mills, which have often excited the stranger’s curiosity, now in their half-employed condition, tell only of a vast industry that has been lessened in extent, but is still an important one. The Clonmel Brewery, the most extensive manufacturing concern in Clonmel – Messrs. Thos. Murphy & CO. – has recently been considerably enlarged. The Clonmel Brand, in beer as well as butter, is in high repute on the other side of the Channel. This year a very large boot and shoe factory, fitted up with the finest machinery, and giving employment to nearly one hundred hands, was opened at Suir Island, Clonmel, by Mr. James Myers. ‘

The visitor will find Clonmel wearing a clean and thriving appearance. Its streets – from almost every one of which views of the adjacent mountains are had are spacious, handsomely edificed, and well regulated. The town is now under the immediate charge of the Corporation. Commercial enterprise serves to fill our various establishments with articles of the best class, rendering a visit to the metropolis unnecessary. Clonnmel was the residence from early childhood of the celebrated and beautiful Marguerite, Countess of Blesssington, third daughter of Mr. Edmond Power, who was the publisher of one of the earliest newspapers printed here. She was first the wife of the unfortunate Captain Farmer, to whom she was married at St. Mary’s Church, Clonmel; afterwards of the Earl of Blessington. Her salons in London were as popular as those of Holland House, and were the resort of the learned men of the day. To support her expenditure, she entered upon a career of authorship which knew no relaxation throughout the remainder of her life. She died at Paris. in 1849. Here also was born, in the year 1713, Laurence Sterne, the distinguished novelist; and remoter still, Bonaventura Baron, who wrote numerous works, during a long residence in Rome, where he died in 1696. Clonmel gives the title of Earl, in the peerage of Ireland, to the noble family of Scott. Captain Thomas Scott was an officer in the service of William III.; and his grandson, John Scott, Esq., was made Lord Chief Justice of the King’s Bench and Baron Earlsfort in 1874, Viscount Clonmell in 1789, and Earl of Clonmell in 1793.

The Suir bisects both the parish and town of Clonmel ; and during the whole of its transit, as well as over long stretches both above and below, it is rich in the beauties of landscape. Nearly all the parish is a gallery of fine scenes, all interesting, many much diversified, and some sweetly and even grandly powerful. From Merlin, the residence of S. Fayle, Esq., situated on the right bank of the river, close to Clonmel, a magnificent view over the valley of the Suir is laid open – not surpassed, in richness and variety, by any of the celebrated vales of England and Wales. In the immediate environs of the Waterford portion of the town are some very handsome villas. West of the town is Marlfield, the beautiful estate and residence of the Bagwell family, and where, during the last Royal Agricultural Show at Clonmel, the then Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland (Lord Wodehouse) was entertained with splendid hospitality. Adjoining Marlfield is the beautiful demesne of Knocklofty, the seat of the Earl and Countess of Donoughmore, remarkable for its fine old timber and the richest of woodland scenery. Two miles from the town, on the road to Caher, is Barne, the handsome mansion of Stephen Moore. Esq., D.L.; and four miles on the on the same road is Woodrooffe, the extensively wooded demesne of Samuel Perry, Esq., D.L. On the way to Cashel are Rathronan House and Knockeevan, the seats respectively of George Gough, Esq., and General Sir John Bloomfield Gough, G.C.B. Below the town, at from two to three miles, are Newtown, the seat of the Osbrone family; Tickencor Castle; the interesting and extended mountain ravine of Glenpatrick; and the magnificent woods of Gurteen.

(1) The figure “6” has been partly cut away so as to make it resemble “0” at first sight.

Take from:
My Clonmel Scrapbook
Compiled & Edited James White
Second 1000 ; Published E. Downey & Co., Waterford ; 1907 ; No. ISBN

King’s County Chronicle, October 1845

The King’s County Chronicle, General Advertiser for the Unions of Parsonstown, Tullamore and Roscrea, Vol. 1 – No. 1, Parsonstown, Wednesday September 24, 1845

Prospectus for the King”s County Chronicle.

First publication Wednesday, September 24th, 1845

Our Prospectus
The leading object of this Journal will be to afford that attention to the interests of the King’s County, which its importance demands, whether as regards its central position, its agricultural and mercantile resources, or its rank, wealth and intelligence: in short, to give the county the full advantages of an efficient LOCAL JOURNAL.

The conductors of the King’s County Chronicle are experienced at the Press; and possessing a perfect knowledge of the local affairs of this portion of the Kingdom with other peculiar facilities, they will be enabled to produce a Journal worthy the distinguished character of the King’s County, and well deserving of extensive support.

The present is deemed a most favourable opportunity for the success of such an undertaking – when Railway intercourse must speedily bring into operation all those capabilities which conduce to the development of the vast internal resources of the country; and towards the success of which a newspaper is a most useful medium in any locality desirous to share in the general improvement.

The Agricultural, Commercial and Mercantile intelligence will be given from the best sources of information. The Mark-Lane Market of the previous Monday, and the Dublin Corn Return of Tuesday, will be obtained in time for immediate publication; while the ‘Stock and Share List’ will be quoted up to the latest period.

As an Advertising medium it will be found very advantageous, a Newspaper being the most suitable and effective medium of publicity; and from the extensive district with which this Journal will be identified, and the respectable classes by which it will be perused, the Chronicle must become a useful and efficient means of public communication.

The King’s County Chronicle will be published every Wednesday at 3 o’clock, by F. H. Shields, Parsonstown, and forwarded by that day’s mail in time for delivery same evening in the neighbouring towns. Subscription (payable in advance) : One Year : £1 : 1s: 8d ; Half-Year : 11s. Quarter: 6s.

Orders will be received –
In London – By Messrs Barker & Co., 33 Fleet street; H. Brooks, ?18 Warwick Square, Paternoster Row ; R. Mitchell, 12 Red Lion Court ; Newtown & Co. Warwick-Square.

In Dublin – At the Metropolitan Office of the King’s County Chronicle.

Tullamore – R. Willis

And by the several News Agents throughout the United Kingdom.

Co. Antrim

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

The Late Case of Embezzlement in Belfast.
It will be the recollection of our readers, that several months ago a young man named Briggs, a clerk in the employment of Wm. Garner, Esq., of Belfast, had absconded, carrying with him a considerable sum of money which had been paid into the office during Mr. Garner’s temporary absence; and that, notwithstanding the efforts which were made at the time by the police to discover the place of his retreat, he succeeded in escaping to America. It was afterwards determined that the culprit should be followed, and in case it would be required, the warrant for his arrest was signed by Sir James Graham, which, under the late treaty, authorized the officer of Justice in pursuit to enter the States. The person selected for this important duty was M’Williams, one of the Belfast detective force, and who, if the report at present in town is found to be accurate, has acquitted himself in a most creditable manner.
Not credited to any newspaper

Wednesday, October 29th, 1845. Vol. 1. No. 6

The Great Hibernian Central Junction Railway
Registered Provisionally

Capital £2,000,000, in 80,000 shares of £25 each –
Deposit £2 12s. 6d., per share.
Power will be taken by the Act to allow four per cent upon the calls.

Provisional Committee
(with power to add to their number)
The Right Hon. John Ladaveze Arabin, Lord Mayor of Dublin.
The Most Noble the Marquis of Ormonde,
The Right Hon. Earl of Devon,
The Right Hon. the Earl of Orkney
The Right Hon. the Earl of Limerick,
The Right Hon. the Earl of Gosford, Lord Lieutenant of the County of Armagh,
The Right Hon. Lord Blayney
The Right Hon. Lord Rossmore, Lord Lieutenant of the County of Monaghan,
The Right Hon. Lord Cremorne
The Right Hon. Lord Dunalley
The Right Hon. Lord Castlemaine
The Count D’Alton
The Hon. Henry Walker
The Hon. John H. Knox, Director of the Newry & Enniskillen Railway
The Hon. F. A. Prittie
The Hon. George Handcock, Chairman of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
The Hon. Charles Handcock
Sir Thomas Barrett Lennard, Bart.
Sir Anthony Weldon, Bart.
Sir Edward H. Walsh, Bart.
Sir George Forster, Bart.
Sir Edmund Waller, Bart.
Sir James Murray, Merrion Square Dublin
Sir John N. R. Campbell, 10 Harley street (London, England) ; Director of the Penninsular & Oriental Steam Company
Francis Carleton, Esq., Director of the Penninsular & Oriental Steam Company
James Hartley, Esq., Director of the Penninsular & Oriental Steam Company
Thomas Gill, Esq., M. P., Plymouth, Chairman of the South Devon Railway
Fitzstephen French, Esq., M.P., Chairman of the Irish Great Western Railway
The Very Rev. Dean of Ardfert
The Very Rev. the Dean of Ross, Director of the Ulster Railway
Cornelius O’Brien, Esq., M.P.
Peter Kirk, Esq., M.P.
John Goddard, Esq., Chairman of the Ulster Railway
William Graham, Esq., Lisburn, Director of the Ulster Railway
John Rannie, Esq., 5, Lower Belgrave street, London
James J. Kinloch, Esq., Gloucester road, Victoria Gate, London, Director of the Newry & Enniskillen Railway
John M’Neile, Esq., J.P., and D.L., Parkmount, Belfast, Director of the Northern Banking Company, and of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
John Thomson, Esq., Low Wood, Belfast, Director of the Belfast Banking Company, and of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
John Harrison, Esq., Belfast, Director of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
Wm. (William) Humphreys, Esq., J. P., and D. L., Ballyhaise House, Cavan
Thomas Harkness, Esq., Writer, Stranraer, commissary clerk of Drumfriesshire, Member of the Provisional Committee of the Bristol and Irish Union Railway
Abram Campbell, Esq., Stranraer, Member of the Provisional Committee of the Bristol and Irish Union Railway
Hugh Barton, Esq., Straffan, Kildare
William T. Osborne, Esq., Beechwood, Tipperary
Jos. (Joseph) Thompson, Esq., John Street, Bedford Row, Director of London & Brighton, and of the Kilkenny and Youghal Railways
Col. H. Dwyer, J. P., Ballyquirk Castle, Tipperary
Colonel Wray Palliser, Derryluskan, Tipperary
Charles Grappy Burke, Esq., Dublin
John Ross Mahon, Esq., Dublin
Robert H. Kinahan, Esq., J. P., Alderman, Dublin
Luke White, Esq., J. P. Rathcline, Longford
Isaac M. D’Olier, Esq., Dublin, Director of the Bank of Ireland
A.M. M’Moran, Esq., Cambridge Street, Hyde Park Square, London, Director of the East and West Junction Railway
John W. Fitzpatrick, Esq., J. P., Lisduff, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Charles Doyne, Esq., Newtown Park, Dublin
Michael Furnell, Esq., D. L., and J. P., Caher Elly Castle, Limerick.
Thomas Lloyd, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Beechmount, Limerick
W. Cope Cooper, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Cooper Hill, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Samuel Garnett., Esq., J. P., Arch-hall, Meath
Henry Thompson, Esq., Dublin
Robert H. Stubber, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Moyne, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Major W. Thompson, J. P., Hollywood Rath, Dublin
Edward Wilmot Chetwode, Esq., J. P., Woodbrooke, Queen’s County (Laois)
Fulk Southwell, Greville, Esq., North Mymms, Hertfordshire & Carronary, Cavan
Richard Greville, Esq., Granard, Longford
J. West, Esq., Capel street, Dublin
Thomas Gresham, Esq., Raheny Park, Dublin, Director of the Belfast Junction Railway
Michael Andrews, Esq., Ardoyne, Belfast
S. Robert B. Evatt, Esq., Mount Louise, Monaghan, D. L., & J. P.
Edward Galwey, Esq., Limerick
Henry Ryan, Esq., J. P., Kilfera, Kilkenny
Henry Lloyd, Esq., J. P., Butler House, Kilkenny
Timothy O’Brien, Esq., Crescent, Limerick
George Garvey, Esq., J. P., Thornvale, King’s County (Offaly)
Isaac English, Esq., Dublin
Leonard Thornhill, Esq., Monkstown, Dublin
Alexander M’Douall, Esq., J. P., Stranraer, Agent for the Union Bank of Scotland
George L’Estrange, Esq., Dublin Castle
Edmond Staples, Esq., J. P., Donmore, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Philip Bennett Lucas, Esq., Manchester street, Manchester square, London, Director of the Sligo and Shannon Railway
Michael Head Drought, Esq., J. P., Harristown, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Thomas Bermingham, Esq., J. P., Carromana, Galway
Robert White, Esq., J. P., Old Park, Queen’s County, (Laois/Leix)
Edward Waller, Esq., J. P., Finnoe House, Tipperary
Thomas G. Stoney, Esq., J. P., Kyle Park, Tipperary
Henry White, Esq., J. P., Old Park, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Philip Reade, Esq., J. P., the Wood Parks, Galway
J. R. Price, Esq., J. P., Westfield Farm, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Benjamin L. Lefory, Esq., J. P., Cardenton House, Kildare
D. M. Maunsell, Esq., J. P., Ballywilliam House, Limerick
Henry Smith, Esq., Kilmartin, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Charles Cambie, Esq., J. P., Castletown, Tipperary
Christopher Harkness, Esq., Craigs Cottage, Dumfries, Writer, Clerk to the Justices of the Peace for the County of Dumfries (Scotland)
John Wetherall, Esq., Parsonstown, King’s County (Offaly)
John Killinger, Esq., Dublin
William Moore, Esq., Dublin
Daniel Henry Ferrall, Esq., J. P., Beechwood, Roscommon
Richard Bourne, Esq., Terenure, Dublin
Robert William Law, Esq., J. P., Johnstownmore, Dublin
John Whitlock Nicholl Carne, Esq., L.L.D., Drinlands House, Glanmorganshire, Director of the Vale of Neath South Wales Railway
Henry Maunsell, Esq., Fanstown Castle, Limerick
Thomas Verner, Esq., J. P., Ormeau, Belfast
Col. H. P. L’Estrange, D. L., J. P., Moystown, King’s County (Offaly)
Pierce Simpson, Esq., D. L., J. P., Cloncorick Castle, Leitrim,
Charles Fox, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Dublin, Director of the Dublin and Armagh Railway and Member of the Provisional Committee of the Dublin & Eniskillen Railway
Garrett O’Moore, Esq., D. L., J. P., Cloghan Castle, King’s County (Offaly), High Sheriff of the County Roscommon
Thomas Hussey, Esq., Castlecore, Longford
William Sherrard, Esq., Dublin
Edward Golding, Esq., J. P., Castleblayney, Monaghan
Major Samuel W. Blackall, D.L., J. P., Colambre, Longford
Simon George Purdon, Esq., D. L., J. P., Tinnerana, Clare
Alexander Drysdale, Esq., Glasgow, Director of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway
James Leechman, Esq., Glasgow, Director of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway
Alexander M’Neill, Esq., Edinburgh, Director of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway
George Adair, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Bellgrove, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Thomas Johnston Barton, Esq., D. L., J. P., Coote Hall, Roscommon & Merrion Square, Dublin
Colonel Henry Westenra, D.L., J. P., Camla Vale, Monaghan
Crofton Moore Vandeleur, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Kilrush House, Clare
Matthew Sheffield Cassan, Esq., J. P., Sheffield, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
John Paul, Esq., Dean of Guild of Ayr, Director of the Ayrshire & Galloway Railway
Thomas M. Gemmell, Esq., Frankville House, Ayr
William Pollock, Esq., Master of the Merchant Company, Ayr
Alex. B. Telfer, Esq., Magistrate of Ayr
William Dent Farrer, Esq., J. P., Brockley Park, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)

Engineers
Thomas Rhodes, Esq., C.E., M. I.C.E., and Samuel Nicholson, Esq., C.E.
Provisional Secretary
William Hamilton, Esq., Roundwood, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix), and 53, Upper Sackville street, Dublin
Soicitors
Messrs Robert Hamilton & Co., 42 Upper Sackville-street, Dublin & Messrs. Malthy, Beachcroft, and Robinson, 34 Old Brock street, London
Parliamentary Agent
William Bryden, Esq., New Palace yard, Westminster
Bankers in Ireland
The Bank of Ireland and its branches
The Provisional Bank of Ireland and its Branches
The National Bank of Ireland and its Branches
The Royal Bank, Dublin
Messrs. J. H. Ball & Co., Dublin
The Belfast Banking Co. and its Branches
The Northern Banking Co. and its Branches
The Tipperary Joint Stock Bank and its Branches
Banks in England
London – Messrs. Paget, Bainbridge and Co.
Liverpool – Messrs. I. B. Barned & Co.
Manchester – Sir B. Heywood & Co.
Bristol – Stuckley’s Bank
Bankers in Scotland
Edinburgh, Glasgow – The Royal Bank of Scotland

Dublin Offices of the Company : 53, Upper Sackville street
London Offices of the Company : 19, Moor-gate street

It is proposed to form a Railway from the South to the North of Ireland, commencing at Limerick and ending at Clones, a distance of 122 miles, with a branch from Parsonstown, through Roscrea to Templemore, of eighteen miles. This Railway will proceed northwards by Killaloe, Nenagh, Cloghjordan, Shinrone, Parsonstown, Banagher, Shannon Harbour, Athlone, Ballymahon, Kenagh, Longford, Granard, Arvagh, Cavan and Ballyhaise to Clones, at which point, it will meet the traffic supplied by the Belfast and Ballymena, the Ulster, the Newry and Enniskillen, the Dundalk and Enniskillen, and the Colerain, Londonderry, and Enniskillen Railways ; thus concentrating, in its northern terminus, the intercourse of all the lines in that important portion of the country ; and on the south, being in direct communication with the various existing and projected lines to Cork, Waterford, Limerick and Tralee &c., it will bring the two extremes of the kingdom into immediate connection, effectually opening up the interior of the country, and necessarily tend to develop its almost hidden resources, while the fact of the line crossing the direction of all the channels of communication from East to West of the country without competing with any of them, forms a singular and strikingly advantageous feature in the undertaking.

A preference will be given to the Shareholders in the existing Companies in connection with this line, in the allotment of Shares.

No application will be attended to that does not contain a reference to a Banker, Solicitor or other person of well known respectability.

Detailed Prospectuses, with a plan, and forms of Applications for Shares, may be obtained on application to the Secretary at the offices of the Company ; to James Bryden, Esq., 19 Moor gate street ; to the Solicitors ; and to the following Share and Stock Brokers:
Dublin – Labertouche & Stafford;
London – Carden & Whitehead, Threadneedle street
Liverpool – Henry Waterton
Belfast – Theobald Bushel
Cork – William Connell
Limerick – Sarah Mahony & Son ; and Mark T. O’Shaughnessy
Manchester – John Duncuft ; and W. W. Heap & Co.
Birmingham – W. H. Collis & Smith
Leeds – Chambers & Boyes
Edinburgh – Robert Allan
Glasgow – Jackson & M’Cowall
through any of whom applications may be transmitted ; and at the Offices of the Company

Assizes News (Court Cases)

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

COMMUTATION OF A SENTENCE
At the last Assizes of this County, an unfortunate man named Edward Day, was tried for soliciting a person named Butler, to shoot John Duffy, the Repeal Warden of Banagher, and having been found guilty, sentence of death was recorded. Although Day was not a native of King’s County, and an utter stranger in Banagher, yet, Mr. Henry Sheane, of that town, having become acquainted with several local matters connected with the prosecution, and being impressed with a conviction of the man’s innocence, very praiseworthily made a representation of all the facts to the Hon Judge Crampton (before whom Day was tried), who favoured Mr. Sheane with a reply, informing him that his jurisdiction on the subject of the trial of Day was at an end, but that he had not failed to forward his representation to the Government; and we are happy to add, that Mr. Sheane’s exertions have not proved unavailing – as, although Day was on board the convict vessel, lying in Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin), his sentence has been commuted to 12 months imprisonment, from the 2nd inst., in the County Gaol of Tullamore, where he arrived on Friday last.

Ballinasloe

The Great Agricultural Meeting and Annual Cattle Show
Of Live Stock, Horses, Sheep, Swine and Implements, Flax, Wool, Butter, Poultry, Seeds, Roots, Grasses, &c. &c. To be held at Ballinasloe, on Tuesday, 30th of September, 1845 and the days following.
Under the patronage of the Royal Agricultural Improvement Society of Ireland. His Grace the Duke of Leinster, President.

Programme for the Proceedings
All implements intended for exhibition must be in the Show Yard this day ; the Exhibitors having first taken out the necessary Tickets of Admission from the Clerk of the Yard.

Monday, 29th September
There will be a Trial of Implements this day, under the direction of the Judges.
Professor Kane will deliver his First Lecture on the Application of Chemistry to Agriculture. Admittance, One Shilling each Lecture.
There will be a General Meeting of the Society at Two o’Clock, his Grace the Duke of Leinster, President, in the Chair, to nominate Judges and Stewards of the Yard for the day following, and to receive Deputations for holding the Annual Cattle Show next year.
All Stock, Sheep, Swine and other articles will be received into the Show Yard this day; the Exhibitors having first taken out the necessary Tickets of Admission from the Clerk of the Yard.

Tuesday, 30th September.
First Day of the Show
All the remaining Stock and other Articles must be at the Show Yard gates before Six o’Clock on the Morning of this day to be placed for Exhibition; but Horses will be received until eight o’Clock, when the gates will be closed, and the Yard cleared to enable the Judges to proceed with their adjudications.
Professor Kane will deliver his Second Lecture at Eleven o’Clock this day.
The Gates of the Show Yard will be opened at One o’Clock for the admission of the Public, at two Shillings and Sixpence each Person.
The Council Dinner will take place at Six o’Clock in the New Agricultural Hall, the Earl of Clancarty, Chairman of the Council, in the Chair.
Tickets – One Guinea each.

Wednesday, 1st October
Second Day of the Show
The Show Yard gates will be opened at Nine o’Clock this day for the admission of the Public at One Shilling each.
The Banquet Dinner will be held in the Great Agricultural Hall, this day at five o’clock, when his Grave, the Duke of Leinster, President of the Society, will preside, supported by Lord Clonbrock, and other Vice Presidents of the Provinces. Tickets Ten Shillings Each.
Admittance to the different Entertainments to be confined to the Members of the Central Society who shall have paid their Annual Subscriptions for 1845, Subscribers to the Local Fund, and such strangers from England and Scotland as shall honour the meeting with their presence.

Thursday 2nd October
Mr. Hugh Ferguson of Dublin, will deliver a Lecture this day, open to the Public, on the prevailing Epidemic among Cattle in Ireland.
There will be a general Auction of Stock, Horses, Sheep, Implements &c., at Twelve o’Clock this day in the Show-yard.
Professor Kane will deliver his Third Lecture at Two o’Clock this day and his Fourth Lecture on the day following. The remaining Two Lectures of the Course to be delivered on Monday and Tuesday, the 6th and 7th of October, during the Fair.
The Proceedings of the Meeting will be terminated with a Grand Ball and Supper, on Thursday night, the 2nd of October, under the immediate patronage of the leading Nobility and Gentry, Members of the Central Society.
Catalogues and Lists of Stock Implements, &c., to be had in the Show-yard, after the Judges have given in their Reports.
Signed by Order
Edward Bullen, Secretary.
Society’s Rooms, 41 Upper Sackville street,
Dublin

** Arrangements have been made for securing every accommodation for Strangers, which can be had on application by Letter to Mr. John Gill, Local Assistant Secretary, Ballinasloe, by whom the same will be provided.

Banaghar

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845
FROM OUR BANAGHER CORRESPONDANT
I regret to inform you that the potato crops in this neighbourhood have suffered extensively. Few fields, if any have escaped, and the disease is daily spreading – a deplorable prospect, this, for the poor.
The Lord Bishop of Killaloe, is this day, holding a confirmation at the Cathedral of Clonfert. The visitation of the clergy and the consecration of the new church at Ballinasloe, takes place tomorrow.
Lord Dunally passed through this town en route to Garbally, on a visit to the Earl of Clancarty.

Co. Carlow

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Serious Case of Stabbing
A most serious case of the above nature occurred at Carrigslaney, County Carlow, on the 14th instant, which seems to have originated in some previous quarrel. Two men, named Philip Furlong and John Williams, alias Foster had some altercation at the above place, when Furlong asked Foster to fight him. Foster said he would not fight then, but go look for a person to be present, and who would see fair play. Foster then went away, and returned in a short time by himself, having a stick in his hand and a bayonet, which he concealed under his coat. Furlong asked him was he coming back to fight him, when Foster raised the stick, and gave Furlong a blow on the head. Foster then took the bayonet from under his coat, and stabbed Furlong in the breast and lower part of the body. A man named Thomas Dowdle, who came up at this time, ran to the assistance of Furlong, when Foster stabbed him in the head, from the effects of which he now lies dangerously ill, and very little hopes are entertained of his recovery. Informations have been taken before J. J. Lecky, and C. Wolseley Esqrs., and a warrant was issued for the apprehension of Foster, who has absconded.
“Carlow Sentinel”

Attempt to Burn a House
On the 16th instant, an attempt was made by some persons unknown to burn the house of a man named Robert Jolly, who resides near Clonegall, county Carlow. The thatch was set on fire near the eave, but the family being up at the time, the fire was discovered, and its progress checked before any serious injury was committed. That the outrage was premeditated may be known from the fact that a threatening notice was posted on his house about a month previously; but as yet no clue has been obtained that would lead to the discovery of the parties who committed this outrage.
“Carlow Sentinel”

Co. Clare
Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845
A young woman named Margaret Meer, who has been employed binding corn near Newmarket, on Thursday last met with a fatal accident in the following manner:- It appears that a number of the men had been engaged in reaping, and that having ceased from their work for the purposes of smoking, a man named Donovan ran away with a coal of fire and another man ran after him to take it from him, when Donovan turned suddenly from him, his hook, which was under his arm, entered the left side of the chest of the deceased, who was behind and quite close to him. It penetrated her heart, when she instantly fell, exclaiming she was killed, and died in a few moments. An inquest was held by Mr. Whitestone, and a verdict of accidental death found – the jury imputing no blame whatever on Donovan.
“Clare Journal”

Co. Cork

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845
Departure of the Squadron
The unexpected departure of the fleet took place on Thursday. After dinner on board the ships the signal for sailing was made, and in a short time the Albion, Canopus, Queen, Trafalgar, Superb, Rodney, St. Vincent, and Vanguard, had respectively given out their ample canvas to the wind, and were successively bearing out of the harbour’s mouth. Passing into the Atlantic they shaped their course S.E. by S. The Rattler and Stromboli accompanied them. The Crocodile and Tartarus alone remain in this harbour. It is said that several officers were left behind, so sudden was the order to sail. They will join their respective ships at Plymouth.
“Cork Constitution”

Co. Dublin

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

The Briefless – Dublin
A woman named Dillon complained on Wednesday to the Magistrates at the Head Police Office, Dublin, of a barrister who ‘offered’ her his services to prosecute a person named Haslam, against whom she had a complaint. Informations being granted in this case, the ‘worthy’ barrister slipped out behind his client’s back and pocketed the sum of ten shillings and sixpence by this ‘honorable’ transaction! Mr. Casserly stated that such persons were prowling about the police offices, and were a disgrace to the profession. Mr. Porter, himself a barrister, and one of the bench, stated: “I would sooner see the members of my profession, carrying hods of mortar, or cleaning out ash-pits than have them found acting in so disgraceful and unprofessional a manner. I don’t like to say anything harsh in the absence of the professional person who is here charged upon oath; but I cannot avoid considering the gentlemen of the English Bar, who have utterly acted upon such a hostile part to the Reporters of the Press – a body composed of Gentlemen of talent, and the highest order of genius, and remarkable for their good conduct, will think of the comparison, after they have heard of this case.”

Extraordinary Sale of Cattle.
We (“Dublin Mercantile Advertiser”) have received a letter from a friend in Yorkshire, which gives the following account of a sale of cattle belonging to the Earl of Carlisle, at Castle Howard, a few days since: – 1 cow, “Sister Mary”, brought 189 guineas; 1 cow, 121 guineas 15s.; 11 pigs, 70 guineas 10s.; 32 cows, 1,611 guineas 15s.; 16 heifer calves 682 guineas 10s.

Frankford

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

FROM OUR FRANKFORD CORRESPONDANT
SERIOUS ASSAULT
In one of the lanes in this town there resides two families named Coins and Meaghers: the youthful members of both are continuously quarrelling, and causing much annoyance to their more peaceable neighbours. On Monday morning, Coine (sic) saw some of the young Meaghers beating his children, he followed them to their house, using very violent language, when Mrs. Meagher struck him with a broom in the face. Coine then seized a rake, with which he gave the woman a violent blow on the head, which fractured her skull. The matter having been communicated to the police, Head-Constable M’Guinness proceeded to search for Coine, whom he found concealed in a field. Coine, on seeing the constable made off, but was quickly pursued, and after a smart chase, captured. He has been fully committed to abide his trial at the ensuing Assizes. Mrs. Meagher has been removed to the County Infirmary, where she lies in a dangerous state. No hopes are entertained of her recovery.

Co. Galway

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Herring Fishery – Galway
We rejoice to state that in the recollection of the oldest inhabitant, there has not been a more plentiful supply of herrings taken in our bay than on Monday night last; and on every evening up to Thursday. The rough weather has interrupted the fishery since then but it is well that even for a few days the labours of those engaged in the trade have been attended with so much success. On Tuesday the herrings which wee of good size and flavour, sold at 12s. 6d. per thousand, but the price has since advanced.
“Galway Mercury”

The Potato Crops.
Considerable alarm has been excited by the reports from various quarters, of a failure in the potato crop, this season; and though we rejoice to learn that there is no ground for apprehension in this neighbourhood, still the effect of the rumour has been to raise the price of this most necessary article of food. Potatoes which at this season are generally sold for 2½d to 3d now fetch 5½d per stone.
“Galway Mercury”

Wednesday Oct 29th, 1845
Mrs. Oliver of Loughrea, unconsciously killed one of her children, by turning it up in a press bed, where the little innocent lay hid by the bedclothes from the eye of its parent

General News

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Repeal Association – Monday.
The attendance in the hall was much more numerous, and the proceedings less dull, than on this day week. The death of the late Mr. Davis was principal subject of the speeches, and glowing panegyrics were pronounced by the various orators. Many other more conspicuous members were attired in the uniform of the ’82 Club, and were vociferously applauded on their appearance. The chair was filled by Counsellor O’Hea. Mr. J. O’Connell read letters from his father and W. S. O’Brien, Esq., deeply expressive of their sorrow at the premature demise of Mr. Davis, and of grief for the loss which his cause and his country has sustained. The rent reached £200

The Potato Crops.
Considerable alarm has been excited by the reports from various quarters, of a failure in the potato crop, this season; and though we rejoice to learn that there is no ground for apprehension in this neighbourhood, still the effect of the rumour has been to raise the price of this most necessary article of food. Potatoes which at this season are generally sold for 2½d to 3d now fetch 5½d per stone.
“Galway Mercury”

The greater part of the week has been wet – heavy and incessant rain, occurring at a most unfavourable period, the crops being fit for harvesting all round this neighbourhood.
“Sligo Journal”

As we heretofore announced, the crops in this county are superb ; the oats are far beyond an average, and what wheat has been cultivated, met with the utmost success – the best test of the quality of oats is to be found in its produce when ground, and we are gratified to learn that in every instance, where tested, it has given the utmost satisfaction. We have spoken to several farmers on the subject of the potato crop and their answers have been invariably, that they have not had better for many years, both as regards quality and quantity. The late rains have impeded the sickle within the last few days, but no material injury has yet taken place. We are happy to notice by the change in the barometer today, accompanied by a favourable alteration in the wind, that the prospect of the weather is cheering. The green crops of every kind present a most delightful and luxuriant appearance; nothing can exceed the prospect of Skirving’s turnips ; and the purple topped Aberdeens are also not inferior.
“Westmeath Guardian”

FROM OUR BANAGHER CORRESPONDANT
I regret to inform you that the potato crops in this neighbourhood have suffered extensively. Few fields, if any have escaped, and the disease is daily spreading – a deplorable prospect, this, for the poor.
The Lord Bishop of Killaloe, is this day, holding a confirmation at the Cathedral of Clonfert. The visitation of the clergy and the consecration of the new church at Ballinasloe, takes place tomorrow.
Lord Dunally passed through this town en route to Garbally, on a visit to the Earl of Clancarty.

OPINIONS OF THE JOURNALS

Under this heading we shall give the opinions of the leading papers of all shades, upon topics of prominent interest, without, however, holding ourselves in any way identified with the political doctrines thus promulgated.

From ‘The Times’
Protestant Organisation in Ireland.
The lovers of political sport will be delighted to hear that the prospects for next session are as good as ever. Notwithstanding the great exertions and the apparently destructive expenditure of the season gone by, it begins to be evident that the stock of grievances is undiminished, and the amateurs of the game are in their original strength and spirit. Orangemen and Repealers are urging on the extent of their preparations, and the intensity of their resolves. The Orangemen conceive that they have discovered in the example of their adversaries the road to success. As the circumstances of law being impracticable among a people opposed to its operation was the great plea for the “message of peace to Ireland,” the Protestant Party are beginning to calculate how near they can drive to the law, and how much of it they can reduce to a dead letter. The gentlemen of Ulster meet in the town-hall of Enniskillen, with the Earl of Enniskillen in the chair, “for the purpose of taking into consideration how far a union of all those who are ready to make common cause in upholding the religion of the Reformation could be formed in strict subserviency to the laws.” The circumstances of the times, so often pleaded for surrender and peace, and so convenient a topic for free-and-easy politicians, are their case of necessity for action. With very little affectation of delicacy, they give the world to understand that Sir Robert Peel’s political course renders it “absolutely necessary that a closer union should be formed amongst all classes of Her Majesty’s loyal and attached subjects in this country.” If such are the expressions of confidence Sir Robert receives from his old and faithful friends, what must he expect from his foes?

While the Orangemen are making this use of Sir Robert’s boasted armistice, their opponents are even more vigorously, perhaps still, more effectually, at work. A public dinner at Castlebar, on the 29th of this month is to cement and declare the intimate union between the Liberator and the hierarchy of Tuam. A brisk agitation is to be commenced, with a special view to neutralise the bribery of Maynooth and the infidelity of the Colleges; and the men of Connaught are furnished with new arguments for that Repeal, which they are told can alone effectually secure their consciences and their creed from corruption:-
“The plan of the common enemy heretofore (says Mr. O’Connell) was to extinguish Catholicity by force and violence, by the sword and by the scaffold, and more particularly by the plunder and iniquitous seizure of Catholic property.
“But Satan now, grown wiser than before,
tempts men by making rich, not making poor.”
The present plan is of a different kind. Defeated in actual persecution, the enemy seeks to bribe, to corrupt, to influence, to endow with patronage, and to purchase by various means a new dissension amongst the struggling people of Ireland.
I am quite convinced that their foul intentions, aided though they be with British gold, will totally fail. The clergy, whom the people never deserted, will never desert them: and there is one thing certain – that the men of Connaught are not to be bought or bribed, any more than are the faithful Irishmen of other provinces.
There is indeed, one cause of apprehension, more recent than others – I mean the attempt to carry out infidel education. But we ought to be consoled by reflecting on the history of this scheme in other countries. The attempt to educate the people into irreligion has been openly made and avowedly pursued in Germany, particularly in Prussia, and more recently in France; but even in those countries, supported as it was by the undisguised power of Government, it has failed, and it will fail in Ireland as sure as the sun rises, and leave no trace behind it but the marks of the folly of its invention and the proofs of increased zeal, and even from the xxxxxxx(ink blotched – can’t read) excited in all good men on so iniquitous a project.

From the Bristol Times
Attempts are being made in the North of Ireland to re-organise the Orange Institution, on such a plan however, as to avoid an infraction of the law. The proximate cause of such resuscitation (should it take place) will be what we cannot but consider, the injudicious dismissal of Mr. Watson : Sir Robert Peel’s intention towards Ireland is good and a wise one, namely to assuage and remove party asperities; but the removal of Mr. Watson from the Commission of the Peace was just such an incident as to create quite a contrary result. Party spirit in Ireland, if allowed to escape freely, soon loses itself in vapour, but compressed or confined, like the element of steam, it become powerful and repulsive. Had Mr. Watson not been “victimised,” the ebullition would, in all probability, have begun and ended with the meeting at which he presided; opposed, however, it becomes in its condensed form, sufficient to shake a whole province.

Co. Kerry

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845
The Hon. Wm. Browne retires from the representation of this county on the next election.
Not credited to any newspaper

A grand-daughter of the far-famed Kate Kearney may be seen at Killarney lakes this autumn, with the usual offering of goats’ milk and mountain dew to the lake visitors.
No paper credited.

Wednesday Oct 29th, 1845

Action for Libel
At the Tralee Quarter Sessions on Tuesday, Messrs. J. and J. Eager, proprietors of the ‘Kerry Evening Post’, were found guilty of publishing, on the 12th of July last, an article reflecting on the character of Mr. Rickard O’Connell, Barrister- at-Law, and sentenced to pay a fine of £2 each.

Co. Kildare

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

The New Profession of Maynooth
An examination, which will hold a prominent place in the Annals of Maynooth, has terminated and the following are the new Professors: Rev. Mr. Furlong, Professor of Theology ; Rev. Mr. Behan, Professor of Logic and the Rev. Mr. Garghan, Professor of Belles Lettres
Pilot.

Co. Limerick

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Limerick Harbour
The Tidal Harbour Commissioners visited Limerick, and held an enquiry there on Thursday. Mr. Rea, Collector of Customs, stated that notwithstanding the disadvantages heaped on Limerick, its custom duties had increased in the last 20 years from £58,000 to £170,000 per annum. The shipping in 1825 was 560 tons: in 1845, it was 14,086 tons. At the conclusion of the inquiry, Captain Washington said he had been up the Shannon, and had never seen a nobler or more beautiful river. What struck him as extraordinary was, that it was possible it could have been so long and so grossly neglected. There was great blame attributable somewhere – he could not now say where. He trusted however that the obstructions to the navigation would be speedily removed, and that the desired improvements would be effected, and the vast resources of Limerick developed – for there was not in the British Empire a port which possessed greater qualities.
Not credited to any Newspaper

The General Mining Company for Ireland – The Railways.
We are gratified to hear that 7,000 shares have already been subscribed for in this national undertaking. We are pleased to find the nobility and gentry, as well as men of science, giving their countenance and support ; and with such patriotic names as Lord Dunalley, Viscount Massareene and Ferrard, Hon. Mr. Prittie, and others we have sen among the Directors, joined with Dr. Graves, of Merrion Square, and wealthy merchants of Dublin, we augur success.

Lead has risen cent. Per cent., and this company have, we understand, the most extensive and valuable lead mines in Ireland, and are in treaty so ass to secure fields of copper and coal. This will give employment to the people and great profit to the proprietors
“Limerick Chronicle”

Co. Longford

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

The following is an extract from a letter received in this town on Monday last from Toronto, in Upper Canada, dated August 26th, only three weeks since:- “The Rev. Mr. Davis and Mr. Dease were here last week on a collecting tour for the Longford Roman Catholic Cathedral. I understand they have collected throughout the States, in the last two years, about forty thousand dollars” (which at 4s. 2d each would amount to 8,333 guineas, 6 shillings and 8 pence.)
“Longford Journal”

Lusmagh Parish

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Firing into a dwelling.
On the night of Tuesday last, about the hour or eleven o’clock, a party of armed men visited the dwelling house of a small farmer, named John Deane, residing at Gloster in the parish of Lusmagh, they fired a shot through the door and another at Deane’s dog. On the following morning, Deane found a notice signed ‘Captain Rock’ at his door, threatening ‘eternal desolation and death’ to his son Michael Deane, if he continued to work for Mr. Lyster, of Derinsallagh Mills, at a lower rate of wage than is usually paid to carriers. Constable Kearney and party at Lusmagh, have been unremitting in their exertions since the occurrence, to discover the perpetrators, but without effect.

Parsonstown

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

PARSONSTOWN UNION
Admitted during the week – 6
Remaining on preceding week – 202
Total – 208

Discharged – 7
Died – 0

Remaining on Saturday the 18th – 201
Sick in hospital – 18
Externs – 23

Average expense of pauper per week £0 1s. 4 3/8 d
Total expense of provisions and necessaries £15 7s. 11½d.

In consequence of the calamitous prospects of the potato crop, the Guardians of the above Union came to the resolution that the paupers should in general use a potato diet, thereby saving the oatmeal for a future period. There is a special meeting summoned for Saturday next, to take into consideration the most judicious means of guarding against the worst consequences. It would be well if the poor could be persuaded respecting the relative saving between potato and oatmeal diet; as in the Work-House here the week’s expense for dinner was £3 9s. 3 ¾ d, while for breakfast it was only £2 8s. 8 ¾ d., for the same number.

PETTY SESSIONAL PROCEEDINGS
(FROM OUR REPORTERS)
PARSONSTOWN – Saturday
Before Thomas Hacket, Esq., and Captain Kelly, R.M.
Twenty two cases were entered for hearing.

DRUNK AND DISORDERLY.
A wretched looking creature named Kennedy – whose tattered garments, dilapidated hat, and soiled shirt, the collar of which bore soil marks of a nozey origin, denoted his attachment to the mountain dew – was placed at the bar, charged with having been found in Cumberland street, in a state of happy forgetfulness. Sub-Constable Casey stated that he found the defendant lying across the pavement, he raised him, but his endeavours to make him resume the perpendicular were utterly fruitless – as he bent his body forward, and then, by his own centre of gravity, would descend to the curb stone. By the aid, however, of a powerful shake or two, he showed some sign of consciousness, and, was removed. The Constable stated that the defendant caused a good deal of annoyance, as he was surrounded by a crowd of pugnacious little boys and girls. The defendant stated that he met with some friends, who treated him to two “croppers” and not having tasted food for some hours previously, total insensibility followed, accompanied by a desire to dispense with the luxury of a bed for the coolness of the pavement. A verdict of guilty was recorded against him, and he was fined two shillings and sixpence; but not having the ‘needful’ he was locked up for 24 hours.

PICKING POCKETS
John Fitzpatrick, a young, but frequently convicted pickpocket, in physiognomy an exact facsimile of Thornhill’s popular portrait of Jack Sheppard, was charged with stealing £1 7s 6d, from the pocket of a man named Hugh Larkin. The prosecutor a remarkably stupid old man, deposed that a few hours previously, he was passing along the Main Street, which was very much thronged with people, the prinsoner jostled him, put his hand into the pocket of his pantaloons, and took there-from a one pound note, and three half-crown pieces. He did not catch the hand, but felt it, and kept the prisoner in view till he was arrested. He under-went a very searching cross-examination by Mr. Dowling, solicitor, who appeared for the prisoner. Sub- Constable Nicholson deposed that he arrested the prisoner, and found on his person a pound note and some coppers. Mr. Dowling addressed the Bench, and remarked that the money found by the Constable was not the same that Larkin alleged to have lost. The Bench gave the prisoner the benefit of the doubt, an discharged him. The other cases consisted of petty assaults and common trespass, and did not possess the slightest interest.

Philipstown

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

FROM OUR PHILIPSTOWN CORRESPONDANT
The Quarter Sessions for this division of the county, commenced on Monday morning last, before William N. Barron, Esq. Assistant Barrister.
Eight persons were registered, all Repealers.
There were 7 ejectments entered for hearing, six of which were at the suit of Lord Ashtown: Mr. Mitchell, Solicitor, ably defended each case for the tenants. There are one hundred civil bills entered for hearing, and only eight criminal cases to be disposed of, which is very creditable to the people of the district.

The fair of this town was held on Saturday last, and was rather thinly attended, the supply of sheep and milch cows, was very small, fat pigs and stores, brought remunerating prices, and very much sought after. All passed off peaceably, very few drunken cases were apprehended by the Constabulary.

A large quantity of cattle, corn &c., seized for rent, due on the lands of Killeashin of H. O’Neill and R. Billing, Esqrs., of Dublin, was to be sold by auction, on Friday last, and in consequence of the bailiffs having been attacked some days previously, when making the seizure, a party of the Constabulary were in attendance to preserve the peace, but no sale took place, an amicable arrangement having been entered into.

Thursday last, was the usual day for holding the Petty Sessions of this town. Several suitors attended, but were obliged to return home without having their cases adjudicated, in consequence of the non-attendance of Magistrates, which causes much inconvenience to the inhabitants of this town and neighbourhood.

The Great Hibernian Central Junction Railway

Wednesday, October 29th, 1845 (Vol. 1 – No. 6)

The Great Hibernian Central Junction Railway
Registered Provisionally

Capital £2,000,000, in 80,000 shares of £25 each –
Deposit £2 12s. 6d., per share.
Power will be taken by the Act to allow four per cent upon the calls.

Provisional Committee
(with power to add to their number)
The Right Hon. John Ladaveze Arabin, Lord Mayor of Dublin.
The Most Noble the Marquis of Ormonde,
The Right Hon. Earl of Devon,
The Right Hon. the Earl of Orkney
The Right Hon. the Earl of Limerick,
The Right Hon. the Earl of Gosford, Lord Lieutenant of the County of Armagh,
The Right Hon. Lord Blayney
The Right Hon. Lord Rossmore, Lord Lieutenant of the County of Monaghan,
The Right Hon. Lord Cremorne
The Right Hon. Lord Dunalley
The Right Hon. Lord Castlemaine
The Count D’Alton
The Hon. Henry Walker
The Hon. John H. Knox, Director of the Newry & Enniskillen Railway
The Hon. F. A. Prittie
The Hon. George Handcock, Chairman of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
The Hon. Charles Handcock
Sir Thomas Barrett Lennard, Bart.
Sir Anthony Weldon, Bart.
Sir Edward H. Walsh, Bart.
Sir George Forster, Bart.
Sir Edmund Waller, Bart.
Sir James Murray, Merrion Square Dublin
Sir John N. R. Campbell, 10 Harley street (London, England) ; Director of the Penninsular & Oriental Steam Company
Francis Carleton, Esq., Director of the Penninsular & Oriental Steam Company
James Hartley, Esq., Director of the Penninsular & Oriental Steam Company
Thomas Gill, Esq., M. P., Plymouth, Chairman of the South Devon Railway
Fitzstephen French, Esq., M.P., Chairman of the Irish Great Western Railway
The Very Rev. Dean of Ardfert
The Very Rev. the Dean of Ross, Director of the Ulster Railway
Cornelius O’Brien, Esq., M.P.
Peter Kirk, Esq., M.P.
John Goddard, Esq., Chairman of the Ulster Railway
William Graham, Esq., Lisburn, Director of the Ulster Railway
John Rannie, Esq., 5, Lower Belgrave street, London
James J. Kinloch, Esq., Gloucester road, Victoria Gate, London, Director of the Newry & Enniskillen Railway
John M’Neile, Esq., J.P., and D.L., Parkmount, Belfast, Director of the Northern Banking Company, and of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
John Thomson, Esq., Low Wood, Belfast, Director of the Belfast Banking Company, and of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
John Harrison, Esq., Belfast, Director of the Belfast & Ballymena Railway
Wm. (William) Humphreys, Esq., J. P., and D. L., Ballyhaise House, Cavan
Thomas Harkness, Esq., Writer, Stranraer, commissary clerk of Drumfriesshire, Member of the Provisional Committee of the Bristol and Irish Union Railway
Abram Campbell, Esq., Stranraer, Member of the Provisional Committee of the Bristol and Irish Union Railway
Hugh Barton, Esq., Straffan, Kildare
William T. Osborne, Esq., Beechwood, Tipperary
Jos. (Joseph) Thompson, Esq., John Street, Bedford Row, Director of London & Brighton, and of the Kilkenny and Youghal Railways
Col. H. Dwyer, J. P., Ballyquirk Castle, Tipperary
Colonel Wray Palliser, Derryluskan, Tipperary
Charles Grappy Burke, Esq., Dublin
John Ross Mahon, Esq., Dublin
Robert H. Kinahan, Esq., J. P., Alderman, Dublin
Luke White, Esq., J. P. Rathcline, Longford
Isaac M. D’Olier, Esq., Dublin, Director of the Bank of Ireland
A.M. M’Moran, Esq., Cambridge Street, Hyde Park Square, London, Director of the East and West Junction Railway
John W. Fitzpatrick, Esq., J. P., Lisduff, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Charles Doyne, Esq., Newtown Park, Dublin
Michael Furnell, Esq., D. L., and J. P., Caher Elly Castle, Limerick.
Thomas Lloyd, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Beechmount, Limerick
W. Cope Cooper, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Cooper Hill, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Samuel Garnett., Esq., J. P., Arch-hall, Meath
Henry Thompson, Esq., Dublin
Robert H. Stubber, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Moyne, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Major W. Thompson, J. P., Hollywood Rath, Dublin
Edward Wilmot Chetwode, Esq., J. P., Woodbrooke, Queen’s County (Laois)
Fulk Southwell, Greville, Esq., North Mymms, Hertfordshire & Carronary, Cavan
Richard Greville, Esq., Granard, Longford
J. West, Esq., Capel street, Dublin
Thomas Gresham, Esq., Raheny Park, Dublin, Director of the Belfast Junction Railway
Michael Andrews, Esq., Ardoyne, Belfast
S. Robert B. Evatt, Esq., Mount Louise, Monaghan, D. L., & J. P.
Edward Galwey, Esq., Limerick
Henry Ryan, Esq., J. P., Kilfera, Kilkenny
Henry Lloyd, Esq., J. P., Butler House, Kilkenny
Timothy O’Brien, Esq., Crescent, Limerick
George Garvey, Esq., J. P., Thornvale, King’s County (Offaly)
Isaac English, Esq., Dublin
Leonard Thornhill, Esq., Monkstown, Dublin
Alexander M’Douall, Esq., J. P., Stranraer, Agent for the Union Bank of Scotland
George L’Estrange, Esq., Dublin Castle
Edmond Staples, Esq., J. P., Donmore, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Philip Bennett Lucas, Esq., Manchester street, Manchester square, London, Director of the Sligo and Shannon Railway
Michael Head Drought, Esq., J. P., Harristown, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Thomas Bermingham, Esq., J. P., Carromana, Galway
Robert White, Esq., J. P., Old Park, Queen’s County, (Laois/Leix)
Edward Waller, Esq., J. P., Finnoe House, Tipperary
Thomas G. Stoney, Esq., J. P., Kyle Park, Tipperary
Henry White, Esq., J. P., Old Park, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Philip Reade, Esq., J. P., the Wood Parks, Galway
J. R. Price, Esq., J. P., Westfield Farm, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Benjamin L. Lefory, Esq., J. P., Cardenton House, Kildare
D. M. Maunsell, Esq., J. P., Ballywilliam House, Limerick
Henry Smith, Esq., Kilmartin, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Charles Cambie, Esq., J. P., Castletown, Tipperary
Christopher Harkness, Esq., Craigs Cottage, Dumfries, Writer, Clerk to the Justices of the Peace for the County of Dumfries (Scotland)
John Wetherall, Esq., Parsonstown, King’s County (Offaly)
John Killinger, Esq., Dublin
William Moore, Esq., Dublin
Daniel Henry Ferrall, Esq., J. P., Beechwood, Roscommon
Richard Bourne, Esq., Terenure, Dublin
Robert William Law, Esq., J. P., Johnstownmore, Dublin
John Whitlock Nicholl Carne, Esq., L.L.D., Drinlands House, Glanmorganshire, Director of the Vale of Neath South Wales Railway
Henry Maunsell, Esq., Fanstown Castle, Limerick
Thomas Verner, Esq., J. P., Ormeau, Belfast
Col. H. P. L’Estrange, D. L., J. P., Moystown, King’s County (Offaly)
Pierce Simpson, Esq., D. L., J. P., Cloncorick Castle, Leitrim,
Charles Fox, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Dublin, Director of the Dublin and Armagh Railway and Member of the Provisional Committee of the Dublin & Eniskillen Railway
Garrett O’Moore, Esq., D. L., J. P., Cloghan Castle, King’s County (Offaly), High Sheriff of the County Roscommon
Thomas Hussey, Esq., Castlecore, Longford
William Sherrard, Esq., Dublin
Edward Golding, Esq., J. P., Castleblayney, Monaghan
Major Samuel W. Blackall, D.L., J. P., Colambre, Longford
Simon George Purdon, Esq., D. L., J. P., Tinnerana, Clare
Alexander Drysdale, Esq., Glasgow, Director of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway
James Leechman, Esq., Glasgow, Director of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway
Alexander M’Neill, Esq., Edinburgh, Director of the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway
George Adair, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Bellgrove, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
Thomas Johnston Barton, Esq., D. L., J. P., Coote Hall, Roscommon & Merrion Square, Dublin
Colonel Henry Westenra, D.L., J. P., Camla Vale, Monaghan
Crofton Moore Vandeleur, Esq., D. L., & J. P., Kilrush House, Clare
Matthew Sheffield Cassan, Esq., J. P., Sheffield, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)
John Paul, Esq., Dean of Guild of Ayr, Director of the Ayrshire & Galloway Railway
Thomas M. Gemmell, Esq., Frankville House, Ayr
William Pollock, Esq., Master of the Merchant Company, Ayr
Alex. B. Telfer, Esq., Magistrate of Ayr
William Dent Farrer, Esq., J. P., Brockley Park, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix)

Engineers
Thomas Rhodes, Esq., C.E., M. I.C.E., and Samuel Nicholson, Esq., C.E.
Provisional Secretary
William Hamilton, Esq., Roundwood, Queen’s County (Laois/Leix), and 53, Upper Sackville street, Dublin
Soicitors
Messrs Robert Hamilton & Co., 42 Upper Sackville-street, Dublin & Messrs. Malthy, Beachcroft, and Robinson, 34 Old Brock street, London
Parliamentary Agent
William Bryden, Esq., New Palace yard, Westminster
Bankers in Ireland
The Bank of Ireland and its branches
The Provisional Bank of Ireland and its Branches
The National Bank of Ireland and its Branches
The Royal Bank, Dublin
Messrs. J. H. Ball & Co., Dublin
The Belfast Banking Co. and its Branches
The Northern Banking Co. and its Branches
The Tipperary Joint Stock Bank and its Branches
Banks in England
London – Messrs. Paget, Bainbridge and Co.
Liverpool – Messrs. I. B. Barned & Co.
Manchester – Sir B. Heywood & Co.
Bristol – Stuckley’s Bank
Bankers in Scotland
Edinburgh, Glasgow – The Royal Bank of Scotland
Dublin Offices of the Company : 53, Upper Sackville street
London Offices of the Company : 19, Moor-gate street

It is proposed to form a Railway from the South to the North of Ireland, commencing at Limerick and ending at Clones, a distance of 122 miles, with a branch from Parsonstown, through Roscrea to Templemore, of eighteen miles. This Railway will proceed northwards by Killaloe, Nenagh, Cloghjordan, Shinrone, Parsonstown, Banagher, Shannon Harbour, Athlone, Ballymahon, Kenagh, Longford, Granard, Arvagh, Cavan and Ballyhaise to Clones, at which point, it will meet the traffic supplied by the Belfast and Ballymena, the Ulster, the Newry and Enniskillen, the Dundalk and Enniskillen, and the Colerain, Londonderry, and Enniskillen Railways ; thus concentrating, in its northern terminus, the intercourse of all the lines in that important portion of the country ; and on the south, being in direct communication with the various existing and projected lines to Cork, Waterford, Limerick and Tralee &c., it will bring the two extremes of the kingdom into immediate connection, effectually opening up the interior of the country, and necessarily tend to develop its almost hidden resources, while the fact of the line crossing the direction of all the channels of communication from East to West of the country without competing with any of them, forms a singular and strikingly advantageous feature in the undertaking.

A preference will be given to the Shareholders in the existing Companies in connection with this line, in the allotment of Shares.

No application will be attended to that does not contain a reference to a Banker, Solicitor or other person of well known respectability.

Detailed Prospectuses, with a plan, and forms of Applications for Shares, may be obtained on application to the Secretary at the offices of the Company ; to James Bryden, Esq., 19 Moor gate street ; to the Solicitors ; and to the following Share and Stock Brokers:
Dublin – Labertouche & Stafford;
London – Carden & Whitehead, Threadneedle street
Liverpool – Henry Waterton
Belfast – Theobald Bushel
Cork – William Connell
Limerick – Sarah Mahony & Son ; and Mark T. O’Shaughnessy
Manchester – John Duncuft ; and W. W. Heap & Co.
Birmingham – W. H. Collis & Smith
Leeds – Chambers & Boyes
Edinburgh – Robert Allan
Glasgow – Jackson & M’Cowall
through any of whom applications may be transmitted ; and at the Offices of the Company

Co. Sligo

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Shocking Murder – Sligo
We are sorry to state that this county has been disgraced by a most diabolical murder, not connected, however with either party, religion or agrarian outrage. A man named M’Hugh, with his wife and her sister, were at Sligo market last Saturday, and after leaving the town, the husband directed the wife to return for some article which he said she had forgot to purchase. She returned to Sligo, and her sister wished to accompany her or to wait for her, but the husband in a most abusive manner told her to go on and they would overtake her. The unfortunate wife never reached her home alive. She was discovered on Monday morning in a potato field in Geevagh, near her residence, her body bruised in several places; and from the marks of a ligature round her neck, Dr. Burrowes is of opinion she died from strangulation. Mr. Meredith Thompson held an inquest on the body, and a verdict of murder was returned against the husband, who has absconded. We understand that the circumstantial evidence against the husband is strong.
“Sligo Journal”

The Potato Crops.
The greater part of the week has been wet – heavy and incessant rain, occurring at a most unfavourable period, the crops being fit for harvesting all round this neighbourhood.
“Sligo Journal”

Lord Palmerston arrived here on Thursday, to visit his property in this neighbourhood. We understand that he purposes remaining for a few days.
“Sligo Journal”

Co. Tipperary

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Tipperary Mode of Paying Rent
In our publication of Saturday last an advertisement appeared for the sale of the produce of five fields of wheat, two fields of oats and some hay, distrained by the receiver under the Court of Chancery for rent due on that part of the Derry Castle estates, amounting to upwards of £200, and which was to be sold at auction on yesterday (Friday). Bailiffs to the number of seven were placed over the property, who visited it every day to see that all was right. On Friday morning, however, upon going to the lands, there was not a vestige of the produce to be seen – not a single straw was left behind – the lads having made clean work of it during the previous night, to the great disappointment of the receiver, the auctioneer and the bailiffs.
“Nenagh Guardian”

From our Roscrea Correspondant – ( County Tipperary)
DARING ATTACK
A most savage and brutal attempt was made on the life of Doctor Downer, near the Post Office of this town, about the hour of 11 o’clock on Thursday last. He was attacked by three or four fellows, armed with bludgeons, who knocked him down with their murderous weapons, inflicting several extensive wounds and bruises on his head and body, from the effects of which he is confined to bed. The only cause that can be assigned for this very daring attack is, that Doctor Downer, a most efficient officer in the Loan Fund Institution here, took an active part, some short time ago, in detecting a fellow, who attempted to defraud the establishment. His friends will be happy to hear, though very seriously injured, he is likely to recover.

ROSCREA POOR LAW UNION – Ex-officio.
Guardians elected on the 11th inst., for the year ending 29th September 1846.
The Hon. Francis A. Prittie ; Colonel Lloyd ; J. W. Fitzpatrick, Esq. ; John Minchin, Esq. ; Henry White, Esq. ; Thomas Spunner, Esq. ; M. H. Drought, Esq. ; Guy Atkinson, Esq. ; and Maunsell Andrews, Esq.
There are at present 275 paupers in the Workhouse of this Union, principally composed of women and children.

Suicide
On Wednesday night last, about 12 o’clock, a young man, by trade a tailor, named Michael Butler, while in a state of temporary insanity, committed self-destruction, by suspending himself by the neck with a rope, from a beam in his own house, in the Gravel Walk, in the west suburbs. An inquest was held by Wm. Ryan, Esq., coroner, when the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts.
“Tipperary Constitution”

Whiteboy Offences.
On the night of the 15th inst., five armed men entered the dwelling of Michael Behan at Knigh, and threatened him with death if he neglected to make his son quit the employment of a gentleman in the neighbourhood. When leaving the house, they fired three shots.

On Sunday night last, an armed party of five or six in number, attacked the dwelling of a man named Edward Burke at Curraghaneddy, broke open the door, dragged Burke out of bed, knocked him down, and while down, continued beating him for a considerable time: they then placed him on his knees, and ordered him to pay a girl who had been in his service, they fired several shots outside his door, and then ran away. Two men named Michael and Thomas Burke, from Toomavara, have been committed for this outrage.

Some few nights since, a party of men went to the house of a man named Dan Carroll, at Ballincarra, when one of them asked to be admitted. Carroll was from home, and his wife of course refused to open the door, upon which, the dastardly and murderous gang, discharged the contents of a gun through the window, without however, effecting any personal injury to Mrs. Carroll.

Friday night last, Head Constable Brown, of Toomavara, discovered a blunderbuss concealed in a ditch at Pallas on the land of a person called Hogan ; it was in excellent order, being locked in a wooden case, like a small coffin.
“Nenagh Guardian”

Melancholy Occurrence
An Awful calamity occurred at a place called the Bogside, near Borrisokane, on Tuesday night last, about ten o’clock. A man named Patrick Farrell and his family, consisting of his wife and four children, retired to rest at about nine o’clock; they were not in bed more than an hour, when the eldest son called to his father and said that there was smoke in the house. The father and son instantly got up, and thought to get out the door, but they were so bewildered that they could not for some time make it out ; by this time, the house was in flames over their heads, the father, mother and two eldest children succeeded in getting out, but, melancholy to relate, the youngest children were burned to ashes – one sevenand the other nine years of age.
It appears that Farrell was scotching wheat on Tuesday, and placed the scotched sheaves in such a position that they came in contact with the fire. Poor Farrell is almost distracted, having lost all that he possessed in the world, except his life, and that of his wife and two children as above stated.
“Nenagh Guardian”

Co. Waterford

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

Alderman Delahunty of Waterford declares that the doom of Messrs. Wyse and Barron, as representatives for that city, is sealed, and that they must turn out for two Repealers.
No paper credited.

The Right Rev. Dr. Foran of Waterford, and his clergy have withdrawn from the local repeal agitation.
No paper credited.

Co. Westmeath

Wednesday, October 22nd, 1845

As we heretofore announced, the crops in this county are superb ; the oats are far beyond an average, and what wheat has been cultivated, met with the utmost success – the best test of the quality of oats is to be found in its produce when ground, and we are gratified to learn that in every instance, where tested, it has given the utmost satisfaction. We have spoken to several farmers on the subject of the potato crop and their answers have been invariably, that they have not had better for many years, both as regards quality and quantity. The late rains have impeded the sickle within the last few days, but no material injury has yet taken place. We are happy to notice by the change in the barometer today, accompanied by a favourable alteration in the wind, that the prospect of the weather is cheering. The green crops of every kind present a most delightful and luxuriant appearance; nothing can exceed the prospect of Skirving’s turnips ; and the purple topped Aberdeens are also not inferior.
“Westmeath Guardian”