Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary, Ireland

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Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary Ireland comprises of several counties, cities, boroughs, parish and villages – with historical and statistical descriptions – of Ireland.

  • Place
    Crumlin
  • County
    Antrim
  • Parish
    Camlin
  • Content
    CRUMLIN, a post-town in the parish of CAMLIN, barony of UPPER MASSARENE, county of ANTRIM and province of ULSTER, 5.50 miles (S.) from Antrim, and 79 (N.) from Dublin; containing 128 houses and 641 inhabitants.

    This town is situated on the river Camlin, of which its name is a corruption, and on the road from Lurgan to Antrim ; it consists of one long wide street, from which branches one of smaller dimensions leading to the Antrim road, and has a neat and all cheerful appearance. At one extremity is the beautiful cottage and highly embellished grounds of Glendarragh the seat of Col. Heyland, through which flows the river Camlin, noted for the petrifying quality of its waters : among the fine specimens of petrified substances which it has afforded is the entire root of a tree of five cubic feet. Adjoining the town are the most extensive and complete four-mills in the country. they were originaly built in 1765, by Rowley Heyland, Esq., and were the first that were erected in the north of Ireland. These mills were considered of so much importance that Government erected very extensive warehouses for storing wheat and other grain, and encouraged by every means the growth of wheat in the surrounding district. There are several other mills belonging to the same company but as all purchases and sales are made at this place they all come under the denomination of the Crumlin Mills. They are now the property Messrs. Robert Macaulay and Son; the machinery, which is of very superior construction, is impelled by the water of the Camlin river, and the quantity of grain annually consumed is on average 3000 tons of wheat and the same quantity of oats. A large portion of the flour is shipped for the Clyde, and the several ports of the north of England; and during the year 1833, 2000 tons of flour and oatmeal were sent from this establishment to Liverpool and Manchester alone. A flax-mill has been erected by the Messrs. Macaulay and several hundred persons in the town and neighbourhood are constantly employed in weaving linens and cottons or the manufacturers of Belfast and other places. From its situation on Lough Neagh this place has every possible facility of communication by water with Belfast, Newry, Antrim, and other towns. Fairs are held on the first Monday in every month for horses, cattle, and pigs ; and a constabulary police force is stationed in the town. Petty sessions are held once a fortnight.

    There is a place of worship for Presbyterians in connection with the Synod of Ulster.
  • Place
    Crumlin
  • County
    Dublin
  • Parish
    Crumlin
  • Content
    CRUMLIN, or CROMLIN, a parish, in the barony of NEWCASTLE county of DUBLIN, and province of LEINSTER, 2 3/4 miles (S. W.) from the post-office, Dublin, containing 958 inhabitants, of which number, 544 are in the village, which consists of 115 houses.

    It is one of the four manors of the county anciently annexed to the Crown, and governed by a seneschal, who receives £300 per annum. In 1594 the village was burned by Gerald Fitzgerald, at the head of the Wicklow insurgents. In 1690; after the victory of the River Boyne, a, part of Williams army encamped here ; and it is said to have been at this place that the king himself settled the method of granting protection, which was accordingly made public. On July 10th, he also issued hence his proclamation for stopping the currency of the brass money coined by Jas. II., except at reduced rates of valuation. It is a police station connected with the city of Dublin police. Here are extensive quarries of limestone, from which Dublin city is chiefly supplied ; and large flour-mills have for many years been in operation at Kimmage.

    The principal gentlemen's residences are Crumlin House, that of W. Collins, Esq. ; Crumlin Lodge, of G. Oakley, Esq. ; Crumlin, of R. Smith, Esq ; and the Glebe-house, of the Rev. J. Elliott : in the grounds of Mr. Smith is a moat or rath, from which is an extensive view of the beautiful scenery in the neighbourhood.

    The living is an impropriate curacy, in the diocese of Dublin, and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of St. Patrick's, to whom the rectory is appropriate. The tithes amount to £250 : the glebe comprises only 1a. 36p. The church, which is a neat structure, was rebuilt, in 1816, by aid of a loan of £1000 from the late Board of First Fruits, but the old tower was preserved.

    In the Roman Catholic divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Rathfarnham : the chapel in the village is a neat building.

    There is a school in connection with the church, and one under the National Board of Education, in which together about 100 boys and 80 girls are educated. About £70 per annum, arising from land bequeathed at a very remote period, is applied to the relief of the poor of this parish.
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