Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary, Ireland

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Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary Ireland comprises of several counties, cities, boroughs, parish and villages – with historical and statistical descriptions – of Ireland.

  • Place
    Diocese of Derry
  • County
    Londonderry
  • Parish
  • Content
    The DIOCESE of DERRY originated in a monastery founded by St. Columb, about 545, of which some of the abbots at a very early period were styled bishops, but the title of the bishop of Derry was not established until 1158, or even a century later, as the bishops, whose see was at Derry, were sometimes called Bishops of Tyrone. The see first existed at Ardsrath, where St. Eugene, the first bishop, died about the end of the sixth centry; it was subsequently removed to Maghera, whence it was transferred to Derry. It is call Darrich in the old Roman provincial, and Doire Choluim chille or "Columbkill's Oak Grove" by some ancient writers. The town is now called Londonderry, from a colony of settlers from London, in the reign of Jas. I., by whom the rpesent cathedral was built, but the bishoprick retains it ancient name of Derry. The see was constituted at Derry in 1158, by a decree of the Synod of Brigth Thaigh, at which assisted Christian, Bishop of Lismore, the pope's legate, and twenty five bishops; and Flathbert O'Brolean, abbot of Derry, was promoted to the episcopal throne. In 1164, with the assistance of Mac Loughlin, King of Ireland, he built the cathedral, the altar of which was robbed in 1196 by McCrenaght, of 314 cups which were esteemed the best in Ireland, but they were recovered the third day after, and the robber executed. German, or Gervase, O'Cherballen, who succeeded to the bishoprick in 1230, took the church of Ardsrath and many others in Tyrone from the Bishop of Clogher, and forcibly annexed part of the bishoprick of Raphoe to his diocese.

    In 1310, Edw. II. directed the bishop of Connor to enquire whether the king or any other person would be prejudiced by allowing Richard de Burgo to retain in fee the city of Derry, which the bishop, with the consent of the chapter, had conveyed to him. Prior to 1608, the bishop had one third of the tithes of each parish; a lay person, called an Erenach, who was the bishop's farmer had another third; and the remaining third was allowed for the incumbent; but Bishop Montgomery gave the bishop's share to the incumbents of parishes, on the grant by Jas. I. of the termon or Erenach lands, amounting to 6534 acres, to the see in exchange. By an inquisition in 1622, the bishop was found to be entitled to fish for salmon on the Monday after the 4th of June, within the great net fishery belonging to the London Society; and also to halt the tithe of salmon &c., caught in the Bann and Lough Foyle. Bishop Hopkins, who died in 1690, was at great expense in beautifying the cathedral, and furnishiing it with organs and massive plate, and is said to have expended £1000 in buildings and other improvements in this bishoprick and that of Raphoe. Derry continued to be a separate bishoprick until the death of Dr. Bisset, Bishop of Raphoe, in 1836, when that see, under the provisions of the Church Temporalities act of the 3rd and 4th of Wm. IV., was annexed to the see of Derry, and its temporalities became vested in the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.

    The diocese is one of the ten that constitute the province of Armagh; it is partly in the counties of Antrim and Donegal, but chiefly in Tyrone and Londonderry, extending 47 miles in length by 43 in breadth, and comprehending an estimated superficies of 639,000 acres, or which 2500 are in Antrim, 139,300 in Donegal, 233,100 in Tyrone, and 284,100 in Londonderry. The lands belonging to the see comprise 77,102 statue acres of which 39,621 are profitable land, and 37,481 unprofitable; and the gross yearly revenue derived from these lands and from appropriate tithes, on an average of three years ending Dec. 31st, 1831, amounted to £14,193. 3s. 9.50d. Under the Church Temporalities act an annual charge of £4160 is, from 1834, payable out of the see estates to the funds of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; this payment is made to diminish the excess of the revenue of this see above the other bishopricks, and is in lieu of the 'Ad Valorem' tax imposed on all the benefices in Ireland. The chapter consists of a dean and archdeacon, and the three prebenderies of Comber, Aghadowy, and Moville. To the dean belong, as the corps of the deanery, the rectories of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, the tithes of which, under the composition act, amount to £3235. 7s. 11.50d. per annum. The deanery lands, which are situated in the parishes of Clondermot and Faughanvale, consist of several townlands, which comprise 2859 statute acres, let on leases at rents amounting to £176. 6s. 4d., and renewal fines averaging £269. 15s. 7d., annually; and the gross annual revenue of the deanery, as returned by the Commisioners of Eccleastical Enquiry, amount to £3710. 13s. 10d., per annum. To the archdeacon belongs the rectory of Dunboe, the tithes of which amount to £480, and the glebe lands comprise 420 statute acres; its gross annual value is £700 per annum. The endowments of the prebends consist of the tithes and glebes of the parishes from which they take their names, and are detailed in the articles on those places.

    The cathedral has neither minor canons, vicars choral, nor an economy fund. The diocesan school is connected with the free school of Derry, which was founded by the corporation of London in 1617. The consistorial court consists of a vicar general, surrogate, registrar, debuty registrar, and 11 proctors. This arrangement extended to the whole of the diocese, so that the bishop, out of 47 parishes, posses 46 estates, and this is the reason why the clergy of this diocese are generally provided with larger glebes than those of the other dioceses of Ireland. This grant included the patronage of certain churches since disputed successfully, except those of Dungiven and Coleraine, on the grounds that the powers of the Crown, unsupported by surrender from the bishop, confirmed by an act of parliament, were not competent to make a valid grant.

    The number of parishes in the diocese is 60, comprised in 57 benefices: that which forms the corps of the deanery is a union of the three parishes of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, and is in the patronage of the Crown; 36 are in the patronage of the Bishop; 3 are in the gift of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin; 8 in lay patronage, and the remaining 9, which are perpetual curacies, are in the patronage of the incumbents of the parishes out of which they have been formed. The number of churches is 62, and of school houses and other places where divine service is perfomed, 11; the number of glebe houses is 47.

    In the R. C. divisions this diocese is a separate bishoprick, and one of eight suffragan to Armagh. It comprises 36 parochial benefices or unions, containing 70 chapers, where are served by 81 clergymen, 36 of whom, including the bishop, are parish priests, and 45 are coadjutors or curates. The parochial benefice of the bishop is Derry, or Templemore, where he resides.
  • Place
    Diocese Of Derry
  • County
    Derry, Londonderry
  • Parish
  • Content
    The DIOCESE of DERRY originated in a monastery founded by St. Columb, about 545, of which some of the abbots at a very early period were styled bishops, but the title of the bishop of Derry was not established until 1158, or even a century later, as the bishops, whose see was at Derry, were sometimes called Bishops of Tyrone. The see first existed at Ardsrath, where St. Eugene, the first bishop, died about the end of the sixth centry; it was subsequently removed to Maghera, whence it was transferred to Derry. It is call Darrich in the old Roman provincial, and Doire Choluim chille or "Columbkill's Oak Grove" by some ancient writers. The town is now called Londonderry, from a colony of settlers from London, in the reign of Jas. I., by whom the rpesent cathedral was built, but the bishoprick retains it ancient name of Derry. The see was constituted at Derry in 1158, by a decree of the Synod of Brigth Thaigh, at which assisted Christian, Bishop of Lismore, the pope's legate, and twenty five bishops; and Flathbert O'Brolean, abbot of Derry, was promoted to the episcopal throne. In 1164, with the assistance of Mac Loughlin, King of Ireland, he built the cathedral, the altar of which was robbed in 1196 by McCrenaght, of 314 cups which were esteemed the best in Ireland, but they were recovered the third day after, and the robber executed. German, or Gervase, O'Cherballen, who succeeded to the bishoprick in 1230, took the church of Ardsrath and many others in Tyrone from the Bishop of Clogher, and forcibly annexed part of the bishoprick of Raphoe to his diocese.

    In 1310, Edw. II. directed the bishop of Connor to enquire whether the king or any other person would be prejudiced by allowing Richard de Burgo to retain in fee the city of Derry, which the bishop, with the consent of the chapter, had conveyed to him. Prior to 1608, the bishop had one third of the tithes of each parish; a lay person, called an Erenach, who was the bishop's farmer had another third; and the remaining third was allowed for the incumbent; but Bishop Montgomery gave the bishop's share to the incumbents of parishes, on the grant by Jas. I. of the termon or Erenach lands, amounting to 6534 acres, to the see in exchange. By an inquisition in 1622, the bishop was found to be entitled to fish for salmon on the Monday after the 4th of June, within the great net fishery belonging to the London Society; and also to halt the tithe of salmon &c., caught in the Bann and Lough Foyle. Bishop Hopkins, who died in 1690, was at great expense in beautifying the cathedral, and furnishiing it with organs and massive plate, and is said to have expended £1000 in buildings and other improvements in this bishoprick and that of Raphoe. Derry continued to be a separate bishoprick until the death of Dr. Bisset, Bishop of Raphoe, in 1836, when that see, under the provisions of the Church Temporalities act of the 3rd and 4th of Wm. IV., was annexed to the see of Derry, and its temporalities became vested in the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.

    The diocese is one of the ten that constitute the province of Armagh; it is partly in the counties of Antrim and Donegal, but chiefly in Tyrone and Londonderry, extending 47 miles in length by 43 in breadth, and comprehending an estimated superficies of 639,000 acres, or which 2500 are in Antrim, 139,300 in Donegal, 233,100 in Tyrone, and 284,100 in Londonderry. The lands belonging to the see comprise 77,102 statue acres of which 39,621 are profitable land, and 37,481 unprofitable; and the gross yearly revenue derived from these lands and from appropriate tithes, on an average of three years ending Dec. 31st, 1831, amounted to £14,193. 3s. 9.50d. Under the Church Temporalities act an annual charge of £4160 is, from 1834, payable out of the see estates to the funds of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; this payment is made to diminish the excess of the revenue of this see above the other bishopricks, and is in lieu of the 'Ad Valorem' tax imposed on all the benefices in Ireland. The chapter consists of a dean and archdeacon, and the three prebenderies of Comber, Aghadowy, and Moville. To the dean belong, as the corps of the deanery, the rectories of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, the tithes of which, under the composition act, amount to £3235. 7s. 11.50d. per annum. The deanery lands, which are situated in the parishes of Clondermot and Faughanvale, consist of several townlands, which comprise 2859 statute acres, let on leases at rents amounting to £176. 6s. 4d., and renewal fines averaging £269. 15s. 7d., annually; and the gross annual revenue of the deanery, as returned by the Commisioners of Eccleastical Enquiry, amount to £3710. 13s. 10d., per annum. To the archdeacon belongs the rectory of Dunboe, the tithes of which amount to £480, and the glebe lands comprise 420 statute acres; its gross annual value is £700 per annum. The endowments of the prebends consist of the tithes and glebes of the parishes from which they take their names, and are detailed in the articles on those places.

    The cathedral has neither minor canons, vicars choral, nor an economy fund. The diocesan school is connected with the free school of Derry, which was founded by the corporation of London in 1617. The consistorial court consists of a vicar general, surrogate, registrar, debuty registrar, and 11 proctors. This arrangement extended to the whole of the diocese, so that the bishop, out of 47 parishes, posses 46 estates, and this is the reason why the clergy of this diocese are generally provided with larger glebes than those of the other dioceses of Ireland. This grant included the patronage of certain churches since disputed successfully, except those of Dungiven and Coleraine, on the grounds that the powers of the Crown, unsupported by surrender from the bishop, confirmed by an act of parliament, were not competent to make a valid grant.

    The number of parishes in the diocese is 60, comprised in 57 benefices: that which forms the corps of the deanery is a union of the three parishes of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, and is in the patronage of the Crown; 36 are in the patronage of the Bishop; 3 are in the gift of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin; 8 in lay patronage, and the remaining 9, which are perpetual curacies, are in the patronage of the incumbents of the parishes out of which they have been formed. The number of churches is 62, and of school houses and other places where divine service is perfomed, 11; the number of glebe houses is 47.

    In the R. C. divisions this diocese is a separate bishoprick, and one of eight suffragan to Armagh. It comprises 36 parochial benefices or unions, containing 70 chapers, where are served by 81 clergymen, 36 of whom, including the bishop, are parish priests, and 45 are coadjutors or curates. The parochial benefice of the bishop is Derry, or Templemore, where he resides.
  • Place
    Diocese Of Derry
  • County
    Donegal
  • Parish
  • Content
    The DIOCESE of DERRY originated in a monastery founded by St. Columb, about 545, of which some of the abbots at a very early period were styled bishops, but the title of the bishop of Derry was not established until 1158, or even a century later, as the bishops, whose see was at Derry, were sometimes called Bishops of Tyrone. The see first existed at Ardsrath, where St. Eugene, the first bishop, died about the end of the sixth centry; it was subsequently removed to Maghera, whence it was transferred to Derry. It is call Darrich in the old Roman provincial, and Doire Choluim chille or "Columbkill's Oak Grove" by some ancient writers. The town is now called Londonderry, from a colony of settlers from London, in the reign of Jas. I., by whom the rpesent cathedral was built, but the bishoprick retains it ancient name of Derry. The see was constituted at Derry in 1158, by a decree of the Synod of Brigth Thaigh, at which assisted Christian, Bishop of Lismore, the pope's legate, and twenty five bishops; and Flathbert O'Brolean, abbot of Derry, was promoted to the episcopal throne. In 1164, with the assistance of Mac Loughlin, King of Ireland, he built the cathedral, the altar of which was robbed in 1196 by McCrenaght, of 314 cups which were esteemed the best in Ireland, but they were recovered the third day after, and the robber executed. German, or Gervase, O'Cherballen, who succeeded to the bishoprick in 1230, took the church of Ardsrath and many others in Tyrone from the Bishop of Clogher, and forcibly annexed part of the bishoprick of Raphoe to his diocese.

    In 1310, Edw. II. directed the bishop of Connor to enquire whether the king or any other person would be prejudiced by allowing Richard de Burgo to retain in fee the city of Derry, which the bishop, with the consent of the chapter, had conveyed to him. Prior to 1608, the bishop had one third of the tithes of each parish; a lay person, called an Erenach, who was the bishop's farmer had another third; and the remaining third was allowed for the incumbent; but Bishop Montgomery gave the bishop's share to the incumbents of parishes, on the grant by Jas. I. of the termon or Erenach lands, amounting to 6534 acres, to the see in exchange. By an inquisition in 1622, the bishop was found to be entitled to fish for salmon on the Monday after the 4th of June, within the great net fishery belonging to the London Society; and also to halt the tithe of salmon &c., caught in the Bann and Lough Foyle. Bishop Hopkins, who died in 1690, was at great expense in beautifying the cathedral, and furnishiing it with organs and massive plate, and is said to have expended £1000 in buildings and other improvements in this bishoprick and that of Raphoe. Derry continued to be a separate bishoprick until the death of Dr. Bisset, Bishop of Raphoe, in 1836, when that see, under the provisions of the Church Temporalities act of the 3rd and 4th of Wm. IV., was annexed to the see of Derry, and its temporalities became vested in the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.

    The diocese is one of the ten that constitute the province of Armagh; it is partly in the counties of Antrim and Donegal, but chiefly in Tyrone and Londonderry, extending 47 miles in length by 43 in breadth, and comprehending an estimated superficies of 639,000 acres, or which 2500 are in Antrim, 139,300 in Donegal, 233,100 in Tyrone, and 284,100 in Londonderry. The lands belonging to the see comprise 77,102 statue acres of which 39,621 are profitable land, and 37,481 unprofitable; and the gross yearly revenue derived from these lands and from appropriate tithes, on an average of three years ending Dec. 31st, 1831, amounted to £14,193. 3s. 9.50d. Under the Church Temporalities act an annual charge of £4160 is, from 1834, payable out of the see estates to the funds of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; this payment is made to diminish the excess of the revenue of this see above the other bishopricks, and is in lieu of the 'Ad Valorem' tax imposed on all the benefices in Ireland. The chapter consists of a dean and archdeacon, and the three prebenderies of Comber, Aghadowy, and Moville. To the dean belong, as the corps of the deanery, the rectories of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, the tithes of which, under the composition act, amount to £3235. 7s. 11.50d. per annum. The deanery lands, which are situated in the parishes of Clondermot and Faughanvale, consist of several townlands, which comprise 2859 statute acres, let on leases at rents amounting to £176. 6s. 4d., and renewal fines averaging £269. 15s. 7d., annually; and the gross annual revenue of the deanery, as returned by the Commisioners of Eccleastical Enquiry, amount to £3710. 13s. 10d., per annum. To the archdeacon belongs the rectory of Dunboe, the tithes of which amount to £480, and the glebe lands comprise 420 statute acres; its gross annual value is £700 per annum. The endowments of the prebends consist of the tithes and glebes of the parishes from which they take their names, and are detailed in the articles on those places.

    The cathedral has neither minor canons, vicars choral, nor an economy fund. The diocesan school is connected with the free school of Derry, which was founded by the corporation of London in 1617. The consistorial court consists of a vicar general, surrogate, registrar, debuty registrar, and 11 proctors. This arrangement extended to the whole of the diocese, so that the bishop, out of 47 parishes, posses 46 estates, and this is the reason why the clergy of this diocese are generally provided with larger glebes than those of the other dioceses of Ireland. This grant included the patronage of certain churches since disputed successfully, except those of Dungiven and Coleraine, on the grounds that the powers of the Crown, unsupported by surrender from the bishop, confirmed by an act of parliament, were not competent to make a valid grant.

    The number of parishes in the diocese is 60, comprised in 57 benefices: that which forms the corps of the deanery is a union of the three parishes of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, and is in the patronage of the Crown; 36 are in the patronage of the Bishop; 3 are in the gift of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin; 8 in lay patronage, and the remaining 9, which are perpetual curacies, are in the patronage of the incumbents of the parishes out of which they have been formed. The number of churches is 62, and of school houses and other places where divine service is perfomed, 11; the number of glebe houses is 47.

    In the R. C. divisions this diocese is a separate bishoprick, and one of eight suffragan to Armagh. It comprises 36 parochial benefices or unions, containing 70 chapers, where are served by 81 clergymen, 36 of whom, including the bishop, are parish priests, and 45 are coadjutors or curates. The parochial benefice of the bishop is Derry, or Templemore, where he resides.

  • Place
    Diocese Of Derry
  • County
    Tyrone
  • Parish
  • Content
    The DIOCESE of DERRY originated in a monastery founded by St. Columb, about 545, of which some of the abbots at a very early period were styled bishops, but the title of the bishop of Derry was not established until 1158, or even a century later, as the bishops, whose see was at Derry, were sometimes called Bishops of Tyrone. The see first existed at Ardsrath, where St. Eugene, the first bishop, died about the end of the sixth centry; it was subsequently removed to Maghera, whence it was transferred to Derry. It is call Darrich in the old Roman provincial, and Doire Choluim chille or "Columbkill's Oak Grove" by some ancient writers. The town is now called Londonderry, from a colony of settlers from London, in the reign of Jas. I., by whom the rpesent cathedral was built, but the bishoprick retains it ancient name of Derry. The see was constituted at Derry in 1158, by a decree of the Synod of Brigth Thaigh, at which assisted Christian, Bishop of Lismore, the pope's legate, and twenty five bishops; and Flathbert O'Brolean, abbot of Derry, was promoted to the episcopal throne. In 1164, with the assistance of Mac Loughlin, King of Ireland, he built the cathedral, the altar of which was robbed in 1196 by McCrenaght, of 314 cups which were esteemed the best in Ireland, but they were recovered the third day after, and the robber executed. German, or Gervase, O'Cherballen, who succeeded to the bishoprick in 1230, took the church of Ardsrath and many others in Tyrone from the Bishop of Clogher, and forcibly annexed part of the bishoprick of Raphoe to his diocese.

    In 1310, Edw. II. directed the bishop of Connor to enquire whether the king or any other person would be prejudiced by allowing Richard de Burgo to retain in fee the city of Derry, which the bishop, with the consent of the chapter, had conveyed to him. Prior to 1608, the bishop had one third of the tithes of each parish; a lay person, called an Erenach, who was the bishop's farmer had another third; and the remaining third was allowed for the incumbent; but Bishop Montgomery gave the bishop's share to the incumbents of parishes, on the grant by Jas. I. of the termon or Erenach lands, amounting to 6534 acres, to the see in exchange. By an inquisition in 1622, the bishop was found to be entitled to fish for salmon on the Monday after the 4th of June, within the great net fishery belonging to the London Society; and also to halt the tithe of salmon &c., caught in the Bann and Lough Foyle. Bishop Hopkins, who died in 1690, was at great expense in beautifying the cathedral, and furnishiing it with organs and massive plate, and is said to have expended £1000 in buildings and other improvements in this bishoprick and that of Raphoe. Derry continued to be a separate bishoprick until the death of Dr. Bisset, Bishop of Raphoe, in 1836, when that see, under the provisions of the Church Temporalities act of the 3rd and 4th of Wm. IV., was annexed to the see of Derry, and its temporalities became vested in the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.

    The diocese is one of the ten that constitute the province of Armagh; it is partly in the counties of Antrim and Donegal, but chiefly in Tyrone and Londonderry, extending 47 miles in length by 43 in breadth, and comprehending an estimated superficies of 639,000 acres, or which 2500 are in Antrim, 139,300 in Donegal, 233,100 in Tyrone, and 284,100 in Londonderry. The lands belonging to the see comprise 77,102 statue acres of which 39,621 are profitable land, and 37,481 unprofitable; and the gross yearly revenue derived from these lands and from appropriate tithes, on an average of three years ending Dec. 31st, 1831, amounted to £14,193. 3s. 9.50d. Under the Church Temporalities act an annual charge of £4160 is, from 1834, payable out of the see estates to the funds of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; this payment is made to diminish the excess of the revenue of this see above the other bishopricks, and is in lieu of the 'Ad Valorem' tax imposed on all the benefices in Ireland. The chapter consists of a dean and archdeacon, and the three prebenderies of Comber, Aghadowy, and Moville. To the dean belong, as the corps of the deanery, the rectories of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, the tithes of which, under the composition act, amount to £3235. 7s. 11.50d. per annum. The deanery lands, which are situated in the parishes of Clondermot and Faughanvale, consist of several townlands, which comprise 2859 statute acres, let on leases at rents amounting to £176. 6s. 4d., and renewal fines averaging £269. 15s. 7d., annually; and the gross annual revenue of the deanery, as returned by the Commisioners of Eccleastical Enquiry, amount to £3710. 13s. 10d., per annum. To the archdeacon belongs the rectory of Dunboe, the tithes of which amount to £480, and the glebe lands comprise 420 statute acres; its gross annual value is £700 per annum. The endowments of the prebends consist of the tithes and glebes of the parishes from which they take their names, and are detailed in the articles on those places.

    The cathedral has neither minor canons, vicars choral, nor an economy fund. The diocesan school is connected with the free school of Derry, which was founded by the corporation of London in 1617. The consistorial court consists of a vicar general, surrogate, registrar, debuty registrar, and 11 proctors. This arrangement extended to the whole of the diocese, so that the bishop, out of 47 parishes, posses 46 estates, and this is the reason why the clergy of this diocese are generally provided with larger glebes than those of the other dioceses of Ireland. This grant included the patronage of certain churches since disputed successfully, except those of Dungiven and Coleraine, on the grounds that the powers of the Crown, unsupported by surrender from the bishop, confirmed by an act of parliament, were not competent to make a valid grant.

    The number of parishes in the diocese is 60, comprised in 57 benefices: that which forms the corps of the deanery is a union of the three parishes of Templemore, Faughanvale, and Clondermot, and is in the patronage of the Crown; 36 are in the patronage of the Bishop; 3 are in the gift of the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin; 8 in lay patronage, and the remaining 9, which are perpetual curacies, are in the patronage of the incumbents of the parishes out of which they have been formed. The number of churches is 62, and of school houses and other places where divine service is perfomed, 11; the number of glebe houses is 47.

    In the R. C. divisions this diocese is a separate bishoprick, and one of eight suffragan to Armagh. It comprises 36 parochial benefices or unions, containing 70 chapers, where are served by 81 clergymen, 36 of whom, including the bishop, are parish priests, and 45 are coadjutors or curates. The parochial benefice of the bishop is Derry, or Templemore, where he resides.

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