Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary, Ireland

Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary Ireland comprises of several counties, cities, boroughs, parish and villages – with historical and statistical descriptions – of Ireland.

  • Place
    Kilfaughnabeg
  • County
    Cork
  • Parish
    Kilfaughnabeg
  • Content
    KILFAUGHNABEG, a parish, in the Western Division of the barony of EAST CARBERY, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) from Rosscarbery, on the road from Cork City to Skibbereen; containing 2461 inhabitants.

    It is bounded on the south by St. George's Channel, and on the west by the harbour of Glandore, and comprises 2911 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act. The surface is gently undulating; the soil is light, and the system of agriculture in a very unimproved state; the old heavy plough is still in use, and the practice of carrying manure to the land and removing the produce on the backs of horses is still retained, except on the lands of Drumbeg, the proprietor of which has introduced the most approved implements and practice of husbandry. There are some quarries of good slate; manganese of superior quality has been raised; and rich indications of copper have been lately discovered on the lands of Glandore.

    The scenery around the bay and harbour is beautifully picturesque, especially near the pleasing village of Glandore on one side, and of Union Hall on the opposite side of the bay. Considerable improvements have taken place at Glandore. The bay is spacious and secure, affording good anchorage; and on the point of land of Reenogreenagh is a signal tower, which was built after the descent of the French on this part of the coast in 1796.

    The principal seats are Drombeg, the residence of the Rev. Jonas Travers Jones; Glandore House, of J. R. Barry, Esq.; Stone Hall, of Major J. Allen; Westview House, of Major E. Allen; Chateau Maria, of F. Allen, Esq.; Prospect House, of J. Morris, jun., Esq.; Glandore Cottage, of J. F. Townsend, Esq.; Glandore Castle, of P. Morris, Esq.; Kilfinnan Castle, of J. Ranclaud, Esq.; Glen Villa, of Capt. Hart; and Glandore Lodge, of R. Adams, Esq.

    The parish is in the diocese of Ross: the rectory forms part of the union and corps of the archdeaconry of Ross; and the vicarage was part of the union of Kilmacabea, but the parishes were separated on the demise of the late incumbent, and it is now a distinct benefice, in the patronage of the Bishop: a temporary church has been fitted up at Glandore. The tithes amount to £297. 12s., equally divided between the archdeacon and the vicar.

    In the Roman Catholic divisions the parish forms part of the union or district of Kilmacabea, and has a chapel at Glandore.

    About 500 children of both sexes are educated in a new school built, at Glandore by Mr. Barry, aided by the National Board; and an industrial department for instruction in agriculture and trades, and an infants' school, are about to be added. The girls' school has the advantage of the direction and general superintendence of Miss Adams, who devotes her whole time to that object.

    There are some interesting remains of the old church; and those of the ancient castles of Glandore and Kilfinnan, which were extensive, have been modernised and enlarged, forming handsome residences previously noticed.
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