Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary, Ireland

Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary Ireland comprises of several counties, cities, boroughs, parish and villages – with historical and statistical descriptions – of Ireland.

  • Place
    Stradbally
  • County
    Galway
  • Parish
    Stradbally
  • Content
    STRADBALLY, a parish, in the barony of DUNKELLIN, county of GALWAY, and province of CONNAUGHT, 3 miles (S.) from Oranmore, on the road from Galway City to Gort ; containing, with the village of Claran-bridge, 1053 inhabitants.

    The parish, which comprises 4291 statute acres, is situated in the interior of an inlet that proceeds eastward from Kilcolgan Point and receives two rivers which flow through the parish, the Kilcolgan river, frequently called the Carnamart, and the Claran, nearly dry in summer and meeting the sea at Claranbridge. The surface for the most part consists of large tracts of naked limestone rock, yet affording, in all those places that are covered with soil, a very nourishing. herbage for sheep, and where tilled throwing up excellent crops notwithstanding its bad culture : the sea weed collected from the shore is the only manure used, and the too frequent application of it has been found very exhausting : ash timber thrives well. The district is supplied with peat for fuel from Connemara and the coast of Clare by the inlet, which is navigable for small craft to the village. There is a weekly market on Thursday at Claran-bridge, and four fairs on the first Thursday after the. 11th of Feb., May, Aug., and Nov. The chief traffic, both in the markets and fairs, is in wheat, oats and pigs, which last are bought up by the agents of the provision merchants. There are also fairs at Tubberbracken in May and October, the latter chiefly for turkeys.

    Kilcornan, the residence of T. N Redington, Esq., situated near the village, of which he is proprietor, is about to be enlarged and improved according to the Tudor style of architecture. In the demesne are the ruins of a castle, said to have belonged to a celebrated heroine of the Clanricarde family, named Norah Burke, but better known, from her cruelties, by that of Norah na Kaun, or "Norah of the heads." Lavally is the residence of T. Lynch, Esq. Several old monuments in the neighbourhood during the three last centuries bear the names of members of this family. Rahasane, lately the residence of R. T. French, Esq., and now of his sisters and co-heiresses, is a fine, thickly wooded demesne.

    The parish is in the diocese of Kilmacduagh : the rectory is appropriate to the see and to the archdeaconry : the vicarage forms part of the union of Kilcolgan. The tithes amount to £115. 9s. 10d., of which £28. 17s., is payable to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, £55. 2s. 10d., to the archdeacon, and £31. 10s., to the vicar.

    The Roman Catholic parish, which is also called Kilcornan and Claran-bridge, is co-extensive with that of the Established Church, and has two chapels : the old chapel is in a retired situation a stone over the entrance bears the data 1763 : the modern chapel at Claran-bridge, a plain slate budding, was erected by the late C. and T. Redington Esqrs., father and grandfather of the present proprietor. A monastery near the village was also built by the same gentlemen, and has been endowed with seven acres of land, on condition that the tenantry on the Kilcornan estate should be educated gratuitously at the school attached to the establishment. An institution of the religious sisters of charity is about to be endowed, and the building erected by Mrs. Redington, widow of the late Mr. Redington, on a piece of grounds given by the present proprietor on similar conditions to the former : his lady contributes £25 per ann. and supplies books and school requisites to a female school, for which also she has built a school-house : 165 boys are educated in the former of these schools and 66 in the latter.

    Near Lavally is the holy well of Tubberbracken, "the Well of the Trout," not much frequented at present. Not far from Kilcornan are the ruins of an old church in a cemetery now in ruins, not used from a superstitious notion of the peasantry.

    The castle of Dunkellin, now in ruins, the property of the Marquess of Clanricarde, gives the inferior title of Baron to that noble-man.
  • Place
    Stradbally
  • County
    Waterford
  • Parish
    Stradbally
  • Content
    STRADBALLY, a maritime parish, in the barony of DECIES-WITHOUT-DRUM, county of WATERFORD, and province of MUNSTER, 7 miles (S. by W.) from Kilmacthomas, on the mail coach road from Waterford to Cork and on the river Tay; containing 3642 inhabitants, of which number, 752 are in the village.

    The parish comprises 10,302 acres, of which 150 are waste land. The village consists of one long street, with smaller ones diverging from it; the houses are well built and command fine marine views; it is a place of some resort during the bathing season, but the accommodations are inconsiderable. Petty sessions are held once a fortnight ; and it is a constabulary police station. Here was formerly a productive salmon fishery, which has totally declined. A new road from Stradbally to Kilmacthomas, shortening the distance one mile, has been lately made. South-west of the village, on a very steep cliff, a signal station-house was erected by the Government during the late war; it has been purchased by J.Hewson, Esq., who calls it Island Castle; he is enlarging and improving the building, with a view of making it his residence; the sea view here is of almost boundless extent, and the cliff on which the house stands is nearly perpendicular, measuring 370 feet from the summit. Near the shore is Woodhouse, the seat of R. Uniacke, Esq., a large and well built mansion, situated in a beautiful valley through which the river Tay winds its course; his ancestor, in 1742 obtained a premium for having planted round it no fewer than 152,640 trees, which form a noble wood, having flourished remarkably, though so near the sea. Woodhouse was anciently called Torc-Raith, or Tar-Cora, and was the residence of a branch of the Geraldines. The other seats are Fahagh, that of Pierse Richard Barron, Esq.; Glenview, of Pierse Marcus Barron, Esq. ; and Carrickbarron, the property of Lady Osborne, but occupied by Pierse George Barron, Esq.

    The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Lismore, episcopally united, in 1799, to the vicarages of Ballylaneen and Clonea, and in the patronage of the Duke of Devonshire, in whom the rectory is impropriate; the tithes amount to £795.4.4., of which £500 is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the incumbent; and the gross tithes of the benefice amount to £661. 8. 8,

    The church is a neat structure, with a tower and spire, rebuilt in 1786 by aid of a gift of £500 from the late Board of First Fruits; the churchyard is well planted, and adorned by the ruins of the ancient abbey, which, being overgrown with ivy, have a very picturesque appearance.

    In the R. C. divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, comprising the parishes of Stradbally and Ballylaneen, and containing three chapels, two of which are in this parish, at Stradbally and Fahagh, the latter built principally at the expense of the late James Barron, Esq.; it is in contemplation to erect a new chapel in the village.

    A school for children of both sexes was endowed with £30 per ann., by the late Pierse Barron, Esq., who built the school house; a school is supported by Mrs. Uniacke of Woodhouse, for children of both sexes, and there is also another public school; in these schools about 200 children are taught, and in a private school are about 50 children. The late Rev. P. Wall, P. P., left upwards of £100 to be distributed in clothing and other charities.

    On the estate of Fahagh are the remains of an ancient building which derives interest from having been the place of refuge of the Fitzgeralds. At Ballivoney the traces of an extensive building are scarcely visible, extending in length 180 feet, and in breadth 90, with an open wall in front; it is supposed to have belonged to the Knights Templars. Two miles south.west of the village, on a very steep cliff, are the ruins of a castle (of which the Irish name signifies "the house of fortification"), built by the Fitzgeralds, and defended on the land side by a deep trench, over which was a drawbridge. At Carrigahilla is a relic supposed to be druidical, consisting of an oval enclosure, 182 yards long by 33 broad, having a large upright stone in the centre and several smaller ones around it. One of the brotherhood of the Augustine friars, ruins of whose abbey are in the churchyard, was called the White Friar, and is the hero of many legendary tales.
  • Place
    Stradbally
  • County
    Laois
  • Parish
    Stradbally
  • Content
    STRADBALLY, a market and post town, and parish in the barony of Stradbally, Queen's county, province of Leinster, 5 miles (E.) from Maryborough and 38 (S.W. by W.) from Dublin city, containing 2392 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Mo?? Bealing" was the site of a Franciscan monastery for ?? in the 12th century by the chief of the O'Mores in 1592, was granted with aLl its possessions containing several castles to Francis Cosby Esq and his heirs "Held as of the castle of Maryborough, in capite, by knight's service, at a yearly rent of £17.6.3, and to provide nine English horsemen". This grant was, in 1609, confirmed and renewed by Jas. 1st to Richard son of Alexander Cosbye, together with the manor and lordship of Timahoe. The town is one of the most pleasant in the county; it is situated on the banks of a small river shich flows into the Barrow, in a vale surrounded by lofty hills, and in a district richly embellished with cultivated desmensnes. The principal street, is spacious; the number of houses in 1831, was 306, mostly well built; the river is crossed by a bridge of three arches. The southern branch of the Grand canal passes along the eastern side of the barony into the vale of the Barrow, opeing a communication with Dublin and the towns on that river, but there are no manufactures, nor is any trade carried on, excepting that arising from the produce of two flour mills on the stream that runs through the town. The market is on a Saturday; and there are fairs on May 6th, July 10th, Aug 21st, Sept 14th and Nov. 21st. A chief constabulary police force is stationed in the town; general sessions of the peace are held here twice in the year and petty sessions on alternate Fridays. The court house is a neat building and attached to it a small bridewell,containing three cells, two day rooms and an airing yard. There is a dispensary and also a savings bank. The parish comprises 1373 statute acres, as apploted under the tithe act, the land is good, and much of it in desmesne, the sytem of agriculture is improved, and very excellent limestone is procured, which is used for building and other purposes. The vicinity is beautifully varied. Stradbally Hall, the residence of T.P. Cosby Esq., is a handsome mansion adjoining the town, and situated in a highly embellished desmesne, within the limits of which was formerly the ancient castle of the O'Mores. Brockley park, formerly occupied by the Earl of Roden, and now the residence and property of W.D. Farrer Esq., is pleasantly situated on the opposite side of the town. In the vicinity are also Ballykilcavan, the seat and improved demesne of Sir. Edw. Walsh, Bart., Kellyville: the residence of Thomas B. Kelly Esq., Timogue of Thomas Budds Esq., Ballymanus of M. Dunne Esq., Moyanna of J. Lyons Esq., Vicarstown of Jas. Grattan Esq., Rahinduffe of Mrs. Baldwin; Derry of John Baldwin Esq., Lohihoa of R. Dexter Esq., Clopook of Mrs. Mahon, and Esker of T. Bailie Esq., The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Leighlin united by an act of council, in 1774, to the vicarage of Moyanna and in the patronage of T.P. Cosby, Esq.: the rectory is impropriate in the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin. The tithes amount to £208.14s.2d., of which £139.9s.7d., is payable to the impropriators and the remainder to the vicar. The glebe house is a good residence, and the glebe comprises 12 acres; the gross tithes of the benefice amount to 3207.13.9. The church is a handsome building in the town, was erected in 1764 by subscription ; the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have recently granted £321 for its repair. In the Roman Catholic divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, comprising also the parishes of Moyanna, Corclone, Timogue, Fossey and Kilcolmanbrook (and also Killeany according to the description of that parish : Killeany was formerly united to Corclone in the Church of Ireland religious divisions); the chapel in the town is a spacious edifice, and a handsome chapel has lately been erected at Timahoe in the gothic style, capable of accommodating 4000 persons. About 80 children are taught in the national school, which is wholly supported by Mrs. Cosby; and there are several private schools. There was formerly a charter school, for which a building was erected at an expense of £3000, of which sum £300 was a gift from the late Poole Cosby Esq. A battle is said to have been fought at Stradbally bridge between the first settlers of the Cosby family and a native sept in which the leaders on both sides were killed. Near the town are the ruins of an old church, the walls of which are about 6 feet thick and of considerable height; Under one end is the mausolewaun of the Cosby family. Four miles to the south is the Dun of Clopoke, an isolated rock in which there are various singular cavities;; it has a level summit, formerly encompassed with a ramprt of stone, and was a fort of the O'Mores; the ascent is steep and rugged, it is now remarkable only for the romantic views which it commands along the range of hills in its vicinity and the rich pastures of Timogue.
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