Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary, Co. Donegal

Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary comprises of several cities, boroughs, parish and villages – with historical and statistical descriptions – of Ireland. Here are From-Ireland.net’s records for Co. Donegal.

  • Place
    Donaghmore
  • County
    Donegal
  • Parish
    Donaghmore
  • Content
    DONAGHMORE, a parish, in the barony of RAPHOE, county of DONEGAL, and province of ULSTER, containing, with the post-town of Castlefin, 13,257 inhabitants.

    It is situated on the river Finn, and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 46,378 statute acres, of which 45,630 are applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £14,331 per annum, and 330 are water. More than one-third is mountainous and uninhabited ; and, with the exception of a small portion of woodland, roads, and water, the remainder is good arable and pasture land.

    The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Derry, and in the patronage of the Lighton family. The tithes amount to £1440. The glebe-house is a comfortable residence ; the glebe comprises 750 acres. The church, situated near Castlefin, is a plain old edifice, towards the repairs of which the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have recently granted £273 : there is also a chapel of ease opened for divine service in 1833.

    The Roman Catholic parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church; there are three chapels, situated respectively at Crossroads, Castlefin, and Sessaghoneel.

    The Presbyterians have three places of worship, two in connection with the Synod of Ulster, namely, one at Donaghmore of the first class, and the other at Raws ; and one belonging to the Seceding Synod.

    There are eight schools, in which about 300 boys and 250 girls are instructed ; and nine pay schools, in which are 620 boys and 220 girls, and 10 Sunday schools, with six classes of adults established by one of the curates, who instructs 180 males and 80 females.
  • Place
    Donaghmore
  • County
    Down
  • Parish
    Donaghmore
  • Content
    DONAGHMORE, a parish, in the barony of UPPER IVEAGH, county of DOWN, and province of ULSTER, 5.25 miles (N. by E.) from Newry ; containing 4463 inhabitants.

    It is situated on the great road from Dublin city to Belfast city, and comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 8396.25 statute acres ; there are 110 acres of woodland, 499 of bog, 16 of waste, and 48 of water ; the rest is arable and pasture land, generally good and in a high state of cultivation. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the weaving of linen for the merchants of Banbridge. Fairs are held on the first Friday in every month for cattle, sheep, and pigs, at Sheepbridge, which consists of only two houses, on the Newry road.

    Drummantine, the seat of the late Arthur Innis, Esq. ; Beech Hill, of E. Curteis, Esq. ; and the glebe-house, of the Rev. M. J. Mee, are the principal residences in the parish.

    The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Dromore, and in the patronage of the Lord-primate, to whom the rectory is appropriate. The tithes amount to £451, of which £251 is payable to the Lord-primate, and £200 to the incumbent. The glebe-house, which is large and handsome, was erected in 1786, on a good glebe of 36 Irish acres, comprehending the townland of Tullagh, or Tullynacross. The church was built at the sole expense of Primate Boulter, in 1741: it is a small handsome edifice in good repair, with a lofty tower ornamented with buttresses, pinnacles, and finials, which was erected, in 1828, by voluntary contributions.

    The Roman Catholic parish is co-extensive with that of the Established Church : a handsome chapel is now being built at Barr, and there is a small one at Ballyblaw.

    A meeting-house for Presbyterians, in connection with the Synod of Ulster, stands on the borders of this parish and that of Newry ; and at the Rock is a large meeting-house for Seceders.

    There is a parochial school on the glebe, built in 1818, and principally supported by the vicar, who gives the master one acre of land rent-free ; also a school at Derrycraw, built and supported by Trevor Corry, Esq. ; and there are five private schools.

    In the churchyard is a remarkable old cross ; beneath it is the entrance to an artificial cave, which extends a considerable distance, the sides being formed of loose stones, covered over with large flat stones : near the centre is a cross or transept, forming two distinct chambers ; the cave is about 3 feet wide, 5 feet high, and 62 feet long, and, at the cross, nearly 30 feet broad. The Dowagh, or Danes Cast, passes through the western extremity of the parish, and in some places forms the boundary between it and Drumbanagher, and between the counties of Armagh and Down.
  • Place
    Donaghmore
  • County
    Wexford
  • Parish
    Donaghmore
  • Content
    DONAGHMORE, a parish, in the barony of BALLAGHKEEN, county of WEXFORD, and province of LEINSTER, 8.50 miles (S. E. by S.) from Gorey, containing 2448 inhabitants.

    It is memorable as being the place where Dermod Mac Murrough, last King of Leinster, landed on his return from England, whither he had made a voyage to solicit aid against the confederate princes who had expelled him from his dominions. From this place he repaired privately to Ferns, which circumstance has given rise to a tradition that Glascarrig, in this parish, communicated with the castle of Ferns by a subterraneous passage, for which search has been made in vain. On the invasion by the English a considerable tract of land here was granted to Raymond le Gros, for which service was ordered by Hen. II. to be rendered at Wexford castle. According to Sir James Ware, a priory of Benedictine monks was founded at Glascarrig, in the 14th century, by Griffith Condon, Richard Roche, and others, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin ; it was, according to Archdall, subject to the monastery of St. Dogmael, in the county of Pembroke (England), whose abbot had the presentation of a monk when any vacancy occurred. At the dissolution it was granted to Richard Boyle, first Earl of Cork ; the remains, consisting only of part of the church, have been converted into farm-offices, and afford no indication of the original character of the building.

    The parish is situated on the coast of St. George's channel, and comprises 5883 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, nearly the whole of which is under tillage ; the system of agriculture is progressively improving. Limestone gravel is raised on the lands of Peppard's Castle, and quarries of an inferior kind of building stone are worked in other parts of the parish. A domestic manufacture of strong linen is carried on here, in which nearly all the female cottagers are employed ; and there are oyster and herring fisheries along the coast. On the shore is Cahore Point, on which there is a telegraph : it is two leagues to the south of Courtown harbour, and about half a mile to the east of it is the northern extremity of the narrow sand bank called the Rusk and Ram, which extends thence S. by W. about 4 miles. At Cahore Point is a station of the coast-guard, being one of the eight comprised in the district of Gorey.

    Peppard's Castle, the seat of H. White, Esq., is a handsome modern mansion, in which have been incorporated some of the walls of the ancient castle ; it is situated near the sea, about half a mile from the road to Wexford.

    The living is an impropriety curacy, in the diocese of Ferns, and in the patronage of H. K. G. Morgan, Esq., in whom the rectory is impropriate : the tithes amount to £300, of which £23. 1s. 6d., is allotted by the impropriator to the curate, who receives a like sum out of the fund of the late Primate Boulter from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The church, which is situated on an eminence overlooking the sea, is a very ancient edifice, supposed to have been a cell to the abbey of Glascarrig, and is now in a dilapidated state, A new district church is about to be erected by subscription, on the border of the parish, near the adjoining parish of Kiltrisk, to which it has been united for the performance of clerical duties.

    In the Roman Catholic divisions the parish forms part of the district of Ardamine, or River chapel, and contains a chapel at Ballygarret to which a school is attached, and there are two or three others in the district. A Sunday school is held in the church ; and a school-house has lately been built on the estate of J. George. Esq., towards which the late Rev. R. Jones Brewster, impropriate curate, bequeathed £100; the remainder was raised by subscription.
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