Tag Archives: 1710s

Dublin Under The Georges, 1714-1830

Dublin Under the Georges
1714-1830
Constantina Maxwell

CHAPTER IV
Life of the Poor

The city of Quang-tcheu [Dublin] … is much celebrated amongst the Quang-tongese for its size and magnificence, and is supposed to contain 400,000 souls, but this cannot be; for, in that case, 200,000 of them must, of necessity, be hurdled [sic] together in extreme filth and misery, which, in such a polished and charitable age and nation, it is absurd to suppose.
JOHN WILSON CROKER, “An Intercepted Letter from J. T., Esq., Writer at Canton, to his Friend in Dublin, Ireland (1804) (a satire on Dublin society, published anonymously)

Great exertions have been made, and are daily making, by humane societies and individuals, for relieving the Poor.
SAMUEL ROSBOROUGH, “Observations on the State of the Poor of the Metropolis (Dublin, 1801)

The Rev. Thomas Campbell, an Irish clergyman who was acquainted with London, while praising the elegance of the fashionable parts of Dublin, remarked in his Philosophical Survey of the South of Ireland, published in 1777, that “the bulk” of the city was “like the worst parts of St. Giles”. “I must say,” wrote Mrs. Delany earlier in the century, “the environs of Dublin are delightful, [but] the town is bad enough – narrow streets and dirty-looking houses.” And practically every other eighteenth-century visitor refers to the filth and squalor of the Dublin poor. “Poverty, disease, and wretchedness exist in every great town,” wrote Curwen, an Englishman who made a tour of Ireland shortly after the Union, “but in Dublin the misery is indescribable.” .

The population of Dublin was variously estimated during the eighteenth century. Sir William Petty put it at 58,045 in 1682. Dr. Rutty, the Quaker physician who wrote “A Natural History of County Dublin”, estimated it in 1772 at 128,570, while the ‘Post-chaise Companion’, published towards the end of the century, gives the figure as 300,000, which represented the popular view. In 1798 the Rev. James Whitelaw,(1) the charitable Rector of St. Catherine’s Church in Thomas Street, determined to investigate the matter and to carry out a census of his own. With the sanction of the Government he took a number of assistants, and together they carried out a house-to-house search. This was not an easy task, for it occupied them ten hours a day during five successive months, and took them into the lowest and dirtiest quarters of the city. “My assistants and I,” wrote Whitelaw, “undeterred by the dread of infectious diseases, undismayed by degrees of filth, stench, and darkness inconceivable by those who have not experienced them, explored, in the burning months of the summer of 1798, every room of these wretched habitations from the cellar to the garret, and an the spat ascertained their population” He put the total population of Dublin at 172,091, but considered that another 10,279 persons should be added if the soldiers in the garrison, the staff of the Castle, the inmates of various institutions, and the students of Trinity College were included. The return under the Population Act of 1814 was 175,319 which shows that Whitelaw was not very far out; it also shows that Dublin had at the time of the Union a greater population than any of the towns in England, London of course excepted. (2)

Petty had shown that the inhabitants of Dublin were “more crowded and straitened in
their housing than those of London,” and by the end of the century-judging from the
account given by Whitelaw – the congestion seems to have grown worse. This was
especially true of the districts known as the Liberties, most of which lay to the south
-west of the, river – in the oldest part of the city.

Whitelaw writes:
‘The streets [in this part of the City] are generally narrow; the houses crowded
together; the rears or back-yards of very small extent, and some without accommodation
of any kind. Of these streets, a few are the residence of the upper class of shopkeepers
or others engaged in trade; but a far greater proportion of them, with their numerous
lanes and alleys, are occupied by working manufacturers, by petty shop-keepers, the
labouring poor, and beggars, crowded together to a degree distressing to humanity. A
single apartment in one of these truly wretched habitations, rates from one to two
shillings per week, and to lighten this rent two, three, or even four families become
joint tenants. As I was usually out at very early hours on the survey I have frequently
surprised from ten to sixteen persons, of all ages and sexes, in a room not 15 feet
square, stretched on a wad of filthy straw, swarm¬ing with vermin, and without any
covering, save the wretched rags that constituted their wearing apparel. Under such
circumstances it is not extraordinary that I should have frequently found from 30 to 40
individuals in a house. An intelligent clergyman of the Church of Rome assured me that
number 6 Braithwaite Street some years since con¬tained 108 souls. These however in 1797
were reduced to 97; and at the period of this survey to 56. From a careful survey twice
taken of Plunket Street, it appeared that 32 contiguous houses contained 917 souls,
which gives an aver¬age of 287 to a house, and the entire Liberty averages from about 12
to 16 persons to each house ….

“This crowded population [Whitelaw goes on to say] wherever it obtains is almost
universally accompanied by a very serious evil – a degree of filth and stench
inconceivable except by such as have visited these scenes of wretchedness. Into the
backyard of each house, frequently not 10 feet deep, is flung from the windows of each
apartment, the ordure and other filth of its numerous inhabitants; from which it is so
seldom removed, that I have seen it nearly on a level with the windows of the first
floor; and the moisture that, after heavy rains, oozes from this heap, having frequently
no sewer to carry it off, runs into the street, by the entry leading to the staircase.
One instance out of a thousand that might be given, will be sufficient. When I attempted
in the summer of 1798 to take the population of a ruinous house in Joseph’s Lane near
Castle market, I was interrupted in my progress by an inundation of putrid blood, alive
with maggots, which had from an adjacent slaughter yard burst the back door, and filled
the hall to the depth of several inches. By the help of a plank and some stepping stones
which I procured for the purpose (for the inhabitants without any concern waded through
it) I reached the staircase. It had rained violently, and from the shattered state of
the roof a torrent of water made its way through every floor, from the garret to the
ground. The sallow looks and filth of the wretches who crowded round me indicated their
situation, though they seemed insensible to the stench, which I could scarce sustain for
a few minutes. In the garret I found the entire family of a poor working shoemaker,
seven in number, lying in a fever, without a human being to administer to their wants.
On observing that his apartment had not a door, he informed me that his landlord,
finding him not able to pay the week’s rent in consequence of his sickness, had the
preceding Saturday taken it away, in order to force him to abandon the apartment. I
counted in this style 37 persons; and com¬puted, that its humane proprietor received out
of an absolute ruin which should be taken down by the magistrate as a public nuisance, a
profit rent of above £30 per annum, which he extracted every Saturday night with
unfeeling severity. I will not disgust the reader with any further detail, and only
observe that I generally found poor room-keepers of this description, notwithstanding so
many apparent causes of wretchedness, apparently at ease, and perfectly assimilated to
their habitations. Filth and stench seemed congenial to their nature; they never made
the smallest effort to remove them; and if they could answer the calls of hunger, they
felt, or seemed to feel, nothing else as an in¬convenience ….

“In July 1798 the entire side of a house 4 storeys high, in School-House Lane, fell from
its foundation into an adjoin¬ing yard, where it destroyed an entire dairy of cows. I
ascended the remaining ruin, through the usual approach of shattered stairs, stench and
filth. The floors had all sunk on the side now unsupported, forming so many inclined
planes; and I observed with astonishment, that the inhabitants, above 30 in number, who
had escaped destruction by the circumstance of the wall falling outwards, had not
deserted their apartments. I was informed, that it had remained some months in this
situation, and that the humane landlord claimed, and actually received for it, the usual
rent …. The most dense population, as might naturally be expected, is found within the
walls of the ancient city, comprehending the parishes of St. Werburgh, St. John, St.
Michael, St. Nicholas Within, the eastern part of St. Audoen, and the Deanery of Christ
Church. This space, containing an area of nearly 45 acres English, had in 1798, 15,683
inhabitants in 1,179 houses; which gives an average of 349 souls nearly to an acre, or
13.3 to a house. There were at that period 137 houses waste. The density of population
however varies within this space; for St. Nicholas Within has only 215.5 to an acre, or
10.5 to a house; while in St. Michael’s it amounts to 439 to an acre, and almost 16 to a
house.”

To be continued

(1) The Rev. James Whitelaw, statistician and philanthropist, was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in 1771. His most important service was his census of the City of Dublin, carried out 1798-1805. His most important work was his History of Dublin, in which he collaborated with John Warburton, Keeper of the Records in Dublin Castle. Neither lived to see the publication of this work, which was completed by Robert Walsh, at that time Curate of Finglas, Co. Dublin. Whitelaw founded several charitable institutions, the most useful of which was the Meath Charitable Loan (1808) for the benefit of unemployed members of the Coombe. He died of a malignant fever contracted from visiting his poor parishioners in 1813.

(2) The population of London, calculated from the parish registers of baptisms, was 674,350 in 1700 and 676,250 in 1750. According to the census returns of 1801 and 1811 it was 900,000 and 1,050,000 respectively. See M. D. George, London Life in the Eighteenth Century, pp. 329-30.

The History of Monaghan for 200 Years, Registered Priests, 1710

From chapter 4. History of Monaghan for 200 years, author : Denis Carolan Rushe B.A., T.C.D., F.R.S.A.I. The first table lists the name of the parish and the priest, the second the names of those who acted as guarantors of the good behaviour of these priests with the residence or address of each person.

Parish Priest Residence
Aughnamullen
Donaghmoyne
Tullycorbet
Magheracloon & Kilanny
Kilmore & Drumsnatt
Tedavnet
Errigle, Lower
Errigle
Donagh & Tehallen
Killeevan & Curran
Rackwallace
Monaghan
Clontibret
Magheross
Clones
Galloon
Mucknoe
Inniskeen
Bryan, Rev. McCabe
Dionasius, Rev. McGuin
Bryan, Rev. McMahon
Patrick, Rev. Casey
Patrick, Rev. Duffy
Bryan, Rev. McMahon
James, Rev. McKenna
James, Rev. Treanor
Art., Rev. Connolly
Con, Rev. McMahon
James, Rev. Duffy
James, Rev. Duffy
Torlough, Rev. Duffy
Bryan, Rev. Hulthahan
Turlough, Rev. Connolly
Philip, Rev. Beggan
Owen, Rev. Mulligan
Ross, Rev. McMahon
Redmond McCabe
Frances Duffy
Owen Duffy
Patrick Duffy
Rory McMahon
Phelim Connolly
Patrick McKenna
John Treanor
Phelim Connolly
Turlough Maguire
Philip McArdle
Philip McArdle
James McArdle
Patrick Duffy
Francis Forster
Philip McArdle
Philip McArdle
Francis Matthew
Residence Surety 2 Resi Address
Carrigaldarra
Monaghan
Drumlanekill
Benmore
Mullanavanog
Edenbrone
Mullinacask
Cloghnart
Edenbrone
Killynenagh
Monaghan
Monaghan
Laragh
Corrigattyduff
Drumrest
Monaghan
Monaghan
Stephenstown
Hugh McMahon
Bryan Brennan
Patrick McMahon
Owen Duffy
Bryan Loughran
Philip McArdle
Patrick McKenna
Patrick McGeough
Edward Hughes
Rory O’Cahan
Torlough Duffy
Torlough Duffy
Patrick Greenan
Patrick McMahon
Earthur Ennis
Torlough Duffy
Torlough Duffy
James Stanley
Annaghscue
Pullins
Enagh
Cornacreeve
Monaghan
Monaghan
Kilfahven
Tonnynumery
Middletown
Latroe
Monaghan
Monaghan
Castleshane
Enagh
Aughnashalvy
Monaghan
Monaghan
Williamstown
Garryduff
Edengilrevy
Cordevlish
Mullaghloist
Cabragh
Knockballaronia
Drumbristan
Dunmadigan
Doagheys
Killynenagh
Legnacreeve
Tandragee
Doohamlet
Corduff-Kelly
Derryledigan
Latnamard
Tullycollive
Ballyphelan

Dublin Assembly Rolls, 1718

Taken from “The Calendar of the Assembly Rolls of the Corporation of the City of Dublin”. The Dublin City Assembly Rolls record the Minutes of the Dublin City Assembly (council) from 1441 to 1841. Transcriptions of these rolls exist as the ‘Calendar of Ancient Records of Dublin’. The calendars record a lot of the history of Dublin city, construction of the Bull Wall, the various prisons. Names given are not just those of the councilmen (aldermen, Sheriffs etc) but of ordinary people. Petitions were made to the council for monetary support. The index on this page lists the surnames found on the various abstracts on this web site and the manuscript number as given in the calendar transcription. Abstracts from a number of years are covered and it is hoped that more will be added to this web site.

Article: “[13.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 17th January, 1717[-18] :
“In the last report we acquainted your honours with the progress that was made in piling on the South Bull, since which the season of the year would only permit us to secure the works after the best manner we could, which has had so good an effect already, that the bank on each side the said piles is considerably risen, notwithstanding the violence of this winter storms has forced out some few of the piles and tumbled out some of the filling-
(m. 65) ‘We have five hundred ninety and five piles by us, which are proper for carrying on the said piling, and do expect a considerable quantity more by the 25th of
March next, which we have contracted for, as reported to last assembly; therefore desire to have your honours directions in relation to the said work when the season
of the year will permit :’Ordered to proceed to the west-ward as money shall come in, and as the season will permit :-Allowed.
“That we have laid down and filled with stones three hundred forty eight kishes on the north side the

page 56
channel since our last report, and there will be wanting (Roll xix. M. 65) a considerable number more, if your honours think fit that the said work should be carried on as the season will permit:’ proceed as aforesaid :- Allowed.
‘ The violence of storms and floods has done great damage to the City Key; but we are now filling up the same as fast as the gabbards can be spared from the necessary business of the Office, and we think it our duty to acquaint your honours that it will be impossible to fill up the said Key completely till the city builds up the breach now in the back wall, and to raise all the said wall to a proper height; there is likewise a great
breach in the wall between sir John Rogersons ground and the citys, which we are of opinion ought to be considered’ ordered that the breaches in the said walls be repaired by the city, and raised to a proper height.- Allowed.
‘Pursuant to your honours order of the last assembly to us directed, on Mr. Thomas Hoults petition relating to arrears due from sixteen gabbards and three wherrys to the Ballast Office, wherein he is concerned, we have examined the said petition and do find only, as Mr. Hoult alledges, that one half part of the said gabbards so in arrears belongs to Mr. John Marney, a quarter part to Mr. Thomas Hoult, and the other quarter to Mr.John Mercer, and are of opinion that all or any of them may be sued for the said arrears amounting to forty three pounds, fifteen shillings, ending May, 1717’
Ordered that the said persons be sued as Mr. Recorder shall advise :-Allowed.
‘An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed: all which is humbly submitted to this honourable assembly:
Thomas Bolton.- Mathew Pearson.- Thomas Curtis. -John Porter – Thomas Somerville- William Empson – Henry Glegg – Joseph Kane.-Thomas Stringer.-
Peter Verdoen – James King – Percival Hunt.’

page 57
‘Whereas there are six aldermen on this committee, and now but seven commons, we pray that the number commons may be filled in proportion to the Aldermen:’ – ordered accordingly: Charles Hendrick, James Somerville, James Stevenson,~ Thomas Gledstaines, Daniel Faulkiner:-Allowed.

m. 65b
An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 17th day of October, 1717, exclusive, to the 16th day of January, 1717[18], inclusive ,
Ballast Office, Dr.
To balance of accounts given in to the 17th of October,
1717, inclusive £29-13s- 4d.
To cash received from ships, etc., from 17th October, exclusive,
To 16th January inclusive 1717[18] £487-7s-10d

Total £517 –1s-2d .
Deduct £485-13s.- 8 ½ d.
Balance: £31-7s.-5 ½ d

Besides in Messrs Byurton & Harrisons hands: £350-0s-0d.

Total in Cash: £381-7s. – 5 ½ d.

There are several debts now due from the Office which, when paid, will considerably sink the above cash.

Per Contra, Cred.
By several disbursements on the Office account,
From the 17th October 1717 inclusive to the 16t h day of January 1717(18) exclusive £406-10s-9d
By money expended since the 17th October 1717 in filling and backing the city wall on the city account as per account. £79-2s-11d.
Total: £485-13s-8 ½ d.

m.67. Admissions to franchise.
Franchise”

Dublin Assembly Rolls, 1717

The Dublin City Assembly Rolls record the Minutes of the Dublin City Assembly (council) from 1441 to 1841. Transcriptions of these rolls exist as the ‘Calendar of Ancient Records of Dublin’. The calendars record a lot of the history of Dublin city, construction of the Bull Wall, the various prisons. Names given are not just those of the councilmen (aldermen, Sheriffs etc) but of ordinary people. Petitions were made to the council for monetary support. The index on this page lists the surnames found on the various abstracts on this web site and the manuscript number as given in the calendar transcription. Abstracts from a number of years are covered and it is hoped that more will be added to this web site.

Article: Roll xix m. 53
1717. Apri1 5.
[1.] Certain of the commons having set forth that the committee for taking in and setting out in lots and surveying the strand between Mabbotts mills and the sheds of Clantarffe, have made the following report:

‘Pursuant to the order of last assembly, we, the committee, havee surveyed the Strand, and are of opinion that the Strand on the north side of Ballybough river, from the highest ground on the north end of Clantarffe Island to the next angle on the west side of Clantarffe house, on the road, containing seventy seven acres, be divided with the Strand on the south side of Ballybough river, containing in all four hundred forty one acres; that Ballybough river be carried on the south end of Clantarffe island in a straight line from the first angle on the east side of Ballybough Bridge in a new canal, the same canal to be eighty foot wide; that the front lots of the channel be divided into eighty eight lots, and the lots to the rear into forty four lots, which make one hundred thirty two lots, and that all the rest of the ground be divided into one hundred thirty four lots, two whereof to be reserved to the city, videlicet, number seventy seven, number ninety two, videlicet, seventy seven on the south side and ninety two on the north side of the canal, for such public use as shall be thought necessary; that that part of the Strand undivided be reserved in common for raising of stones, for carrying on the whole work and improving the same, and accordingly there is a map drawn, which is hereunto annexed; the meares and bounds of the Strand mentioned in Mr. AMORYS lease are described in the map hereunto annexed; that each person whose name is in a list hereunto annexed have two lots.

For the better and more effectual carrying on of the said work, we, the committee, are of opinion that a committee of directors be chosen, consist ing of four aldermen and eight commons, adding thereto the Lord Mayor and Sherriffs for the time being, the aldermen to be chosen by the Mayor and aldermen that are proprietors, and the commons to be chosen by their respective classes of proprietors:
[i.] That five be a quorum, of which the Lord Mayor, one Sheriff, one alderman and two of the commons that are proprietors be present; that the said committee of directors be invested with full power of contracting with workmen, to buy materials, and for carrying on the said work.
[ii.] That any of the said committee may, by the majority of votes by his proper class, be removed, and another chosen in his place, and likewise, on the death of any of the said committee, the said proprietors in like manner to make choice of another in his place from time to time.
[iii.] That every quarter the committee do lay before (Roll xix. M. 53b) the body of proprietors their proceedings, which body shall consist of twenty one proprietors at least.
[iv.] That every person intituled to draw the said lots do, before the said lots are drawn, give their note for five pounds, sterling, value received, to such person as shall be appointed treasurer by the assembly to take the same, and the money to be applied towards fencing out the sea and carrying on the work, and so to be mentioned in the said note.
[ v.] That any person refusing, or on his behalf a sufficient person neglecting, to give such note, he shall not be intituled to draw any lot.
[ vi.] That every proprietor shall perfect his deed in three months after the said lots are drawn, or his grant to be void, and the five pounds to be lost to him, but applied to the publick work.
[ vii. ] That a wall shall be built to keep out the sea ; that the canal be made and walled in.
[ viii]. That the whole ground fronting to the channel containing the 132 lots be taken in at the publick charge, and likewise all the streets in the said 132 lots be walled foundation high, and filled up at the publick charge, and also a key, to be continued, from the northeast corner of the 132 lots to Clantarfe Island, and from thence to the shore on the angle on the west of Clantarfe house, be built at publick charge.
[ix. ] That there be a clause in every deed that the proprietors shall pay quarterly till all aforesaid work be finished, two pounds ten shillings per quarter, the first payment to be made next Michaelmas.
[ x. ] That a fee farm be granted to each proprietor at a pepper corn per annum, if demanded.
[ xi]. That the fees of the city seal be remitted. Mr. Recorder and the Town Clerk are willing to remit their fees; and nothing to be paid but to the clerk for ingrossing.
[xii.] That the committee of directors, or the quorum at least, have power to draw from time to time out of the treasurers hands what sums they shall think fit for carrying on the work.
[xiii. ] That this committee be continued, or a new one appointed, to see what is further to be done, and report their proceedings to the next assembly.
[xiv.] That there be inserted in the fee farm deed Deed. such other clauses as the Recorder and such other council as he shall think fit to advise with [sic].
[ xv.] That the road or strand leading from the Abbotts wall towards Ballybough Bridge, from thence to Clantarfe, be all eighty foot wide, and that the key fronting the channel and also the key continued to Clantarfe Island, and from thence to the angle on the road to the west of Clantarfe house, be all sixty foot wide.
(m. 52. )[ xvi.] That the streets, videlicet, the middle street, back street and all the cross streets, as described in the map containing the eighty eighth and forty fourth lots, be all fifty foot wide, and that the three roads running through the other lots all to be left two perch wide :

All which is humbly submitted to the honorable assembly, this 20th March, 1717: ,
Ordered that the annexed report with the following amendments be confirmed, videlicet :
That the canal be eighty foot wide at the west end of the canal, and to be enlarged from thence so that the mouth of the canal in the east be 120 foot, the enlargement to be taken out of the lots equally of each side of the canal.
That if the Lord Mayor and Sherriffs be not proprietors, then any five of the committee of directors be Sheriffs a quorum.
That if any proprietor shall fail to take out his deed in the time appointed by this report, the committee of directors may give further time to perfect such deed not exceeding three months further time than appointed (Roll xix. M. 52) and by the said report.

That the within committee be continued to consider further, and report to the next assembly what is proper to be done.

That the little brook near Hollybrook be conveyed into the sea at public charge.

That Mr. COGGIN, one of the numbers in the place of Adam REA, deceased, have REA’s lot.
That John NICHOLSON, dyer, being dead, be left out of the list of proprietors.

That the committee of directors do account quarterly, and swear to their accounts once a year.
That the note to be given for the five pounds mentioned in the within report, be made payable within fifteen days after the giving the same.
That alderman BURTON be appointed treasurer, and Mr. Lewis JONES, clerk; that Friday in Easter week be appointed for signing the notes and drawing the lots, and the said committee that is now continued take care that notes be given and the lots drawn in such manner as they shall think proper.

April 26.- Post assembly.( m.52b.)
Upon the petition of certain of the commons, setting forth that there is a vacant lot left for one of the numbers of the corporation of sheermen and dyers, on the death of John NICHOLSON, and that the said lot is to be disposed of: it is ordered that Mr. Robert BULL have a lot according to the condition of the former act of assembly.

May 3.- Second Friday after Easter.( Easter day, 21 April, 1717). (m.56.)
[1.] Daniel COOKE, clerk to the right honorable the Lord Mayor, setting forth that his Lordship, Thomas BOLTON, esquire, came into the Mayoralty sooner than he expected, and thereby obliged to neglect his own private affairs; that the prices of provisions are advanced, and that a lord lieutenant is expected and a parliament tomeet, by which the expence of the Mayoralty must be greater than otherwise it would be, and therefore prays an augmentation for his Lordships use: ordered that the treasurer of the city do pay to the petitioner, on the Lord Mayors warrant, for his Lordships use, four hundred pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[2.] Jacob PEPPARD, esquire, town clerk, setting forth that the present Sherriffs, William EMPSON and David KING, esquires, unexpectedly entered on the office of Sheriffs, and their time wholly taken up in discharge thereof, and that the income wont bear half the expence, and therefore pray consideration: ordered that the treasurer do pay the petitioner for the use of the Sherriffs, on the Lord Mayors warrant, two hundred pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed on his accounts.

[3.] William PARRY, setting forth by his petition at a former assembly that in the year 1700 he obtained a lease in reversion from the city of a tenement and two back houses in Cooke street for a term of years commencing 1717; that about two years ago one BUTLER, who was possessed of both the said back houses, knowig his time was to determine at the commencement of the petitioners said lease in reversion, pulled down the said two houses and carried away the materials, of which the petitioner gave early notice to the treasurer of this honorable city, who went and forbid the same, thepetitioner having no right to the said two houses till his aforesaid lease in reversion. commenced, and therefore could not in his own name or right any ways interrupt the waste so committed by the said BUTLER, he not deriving under the petitioner: ; that by reason of said waste the premises are much less in value than even the said original reserved rent of ten pounds, sterling; that (Roll xix m. 56) the petitioner has been much reduced in his fortune by losses at sea in the late war, besides several losses and discouragements which he sustained in the late times by his known zeal for the Protestant succession, and his voting and appearing in the interest of the city, and he is not able to rebuild the said two back houses; in tender consideration of the premises and the citys own right only to sue for the said waste, and in regard the antient reserved rent was but ten pounds, that the petitioner being no way accessory or liable to the said waste, and paid ten pounds as a fine for his lease in reversion and advanced five pounds per annum rent in expectation of enjoying the whole three houses, whereas (m. 56b) he has now but the old house left to enter upon at the advance rent, besides the loss of his fine since 1700 ; therefore prays to take his case into consideration so far as to grant him such relief therein as this honourable city shall think fit: whereupon the same was referred to a committee, who have made the following report : Pursuant to your honours order of last assembly to us directed, we, the above committee, have viewed the within premises, and find that there have been great wastes committed on the same to the prejudice of the petitioner; that Mr. BUTLER, who made the said, waste, is no ways ingaged by articles to repair the premises, nor able to make compensation: we are therefore of opinion, in regard to the petitioners loss, that five pounds per annum be remitted him out of the yearly rent of fifteen pounds, which he is obliged by lease to pay the city, which we submit to your honours this 22nd of February, 1716:’

Thereupon it was ordered that the said report be confirmed and made an act of assembly.

[4.] On the petition of Elizabeth JENNINS, alias NOYCE, setting forth that her husband was a freeman and served Sheriffe in this city, and that she is much reduced from a flourishing condition by sickness and old age, and therefore prays relief: ordered that the treasurer on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner six pounds, the same to be allowed on his accounts and that she petitioned no more.

[5.] George SERGANT, shoemaker, having petitioned and prayed to be admitted into the place and imployment of Conn MATHEWS, deceased, late regulator of the corn and meale markets of this city: ordered that the petitioner do serve in the room of Conn MATHEWS, deceased, to have the usual salary and perquisites dureing the citys pleasure.

[6.] Certain of the commons, praying to enlarge the assembly: ordered that the assembly be enlarged to nine o’clock.

[7. ] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 3rd of May, 1717 :
That the weather has been so bad that we have not been able to go on with piling or any, other of our works, and likewise the produce of the Office has not been sufficient to carry on any work this winter, as doth appear by the annexed abstract of the cash, but we design to carry on the works as money shall come in, the season of the year now permitting: ‘ Ordered to proceed.
‘That we have agreed with Mr. SHRIGLEY for a number of kishes, and expect them daily, and desire to know whether we may proceed in buying any more kishes:
Ordered to buy more if occasion.
‘That the new engine is not finished; the maker has promised to have it speedily finished, but his promises have been so ill performed for the time past, that thereis no depending on him; therefore we desire to be advised by your honours what course shall be taken to make him perform his contract: ‘ Ordered that the committe do as they shall think fit.
(m. 55) That we design to go on with the old engine in driving the short piles on the South Bull as money comes in: Ordered to proceed.

That there is a dispute between Sir John ROGERSON and the office about sand which was delivered according to an agreement made with your honours, a copy of which agreement and your honours order thereupon is hereunto annexed, together with Sir Johns account and answer.
An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed :
All which is humbly submitted to this honorable assembly:
Mathew PEARSON – Thomas CURTIS – Edward SURDEVILLE -John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE –William EMPSON – Henry GLEGG -Phillip COOLEY – William ASTON – Joseph KANE – James KING – William MAPLE’

An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 17th day of January, 1716[-17], exclusive, to the 2nd day of May, 1717, inclusive :

Ballast Office, Dr.
To balance of the accounts to the By sundry disbursements on the 17th Jannary, 1716[-17,] inclusive: £12 11 s. 7 ½ d.
To cash received from ships etc., from 17th January, exclusive to 2nd May 1717 inclusive: £385 13s 11d.
To cash received from Mssrs Burton and Harrison: £150 0s. 0d.

Total: £748 5s. 6 ½ d.

In Messrs BURTON and HARRISON’s hands: £550 0s 0d.
Deduct the balance on the other side: £44. 6s. 0 ½ d.

Balance in Cash ; £505 13s. 11 ½ d.

Per Contra Credit
By sundry dibursments on the Office Account from the 17th January 1716(17), exclusive to the 2nd May 1717, inclusive : £752 11s. 7d.
By Money paid towards making the new engine: £40 0s. 0d.

Total: £792 11s. 7d.
Deduct: 748 5s. 6 ½ d.

Balance: £44 6s. 0 ½ d.
Sir John Rogerson to the Ballast Offire,.Dr.
To 390 tun of fine sand at six pence per tun £9 15s. 0d.
To 12,000 tun of sand to his wall at three pence per tun ..£150 0s. 0d.
Total.. £159 15s. 0d.
Of which received £50 0s. 0d.
Remains due £109 15s. 0d.

(Roll xix. M. 55)
To Sir John ROGERSON, knight :-March the 20th, 1716[-17.].
Sir,-The Office having earnest occasion for money we desire you would be pleased to pay the above balance of one hundred and nine pounds fifteen shillings to Thomas Pearson, esquire, “or order, and you will oblige your humble servants,- Mathew PEARSON – Henry GLEGG -James KING -Thomas STRINGER – William MAPLE- Phillip COOLEY’

Sir John ROGERSON’s answer to the Ballast master,
March 22, 1716[ -17] :
That he has kept an account between him and the Office, and that he has as much to defalk from them as Bog they now charge him with; that the Office has not pursued their agreement with him, for that he was to have gabbards to attend his work at certain times with ballast for filling, which not being observed he has suffered extremely for want of them, and through their default he has had more earth wasted away by the floods than what he stands charged with by the Office, and that as soon as he has leisure to look into the account, if any balance is due he will pay it.’
Sir John ROGERSON having informed us that he designs very speedily to take in the Strand between Lazy Hill and Ringsend, which we humbly conceive will not only be an advantage to trade, but will also contribute very much to the mending our new channel; therefore he desires to be furnished by the Ballast Office with gravel or sand dredged out of the channel by their gabbardmen (when they have no business in supplying of shipping or any other matter relating to the good of the Office), he paying so much a tun for the mens labour and reasonable wear and tear; and are of opinion that three pence per tun may be sufficient for the same to be delivered at his wall or keay, he finding hands to throw the said ballast out of the gabbards, and not to delay them longer than a proper time for throwing out such ballast. we mustlikewise acquaint you that sir John being obliged by his lease to leave as much Strand as shall be thought proper for enlarging the channel to the southward, your honors will think fit to appoint a committee to see the said Strand staked out between the anchorsmiths shop and Ringsend point: which is humbly submitted to your honors.’

[8.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that it has been customary to present the new Government with the freedom of the city in a gold box, that in regard of the great zeal and fast friendship of the right honorable the Lord BRODRICK(Alan BRODRICK, created viscount Midleton in 1717) lord high chancellor of Ireland, now one of the lords justices of this kingdom, shewn to the city interest on the late troubles in this city by his many services and advice on all occasions, and appearing on hearings and consultations without fees, as also when Speaker in the house of commons, as a mark of the citys gratitude, notwithstanding his former freedom, he should have the same certified in a gold box; and therefore pray the same be certified accordingly: ordered that his excellency the lord high chancellor of Ireland, one of the lords justices, have his freedom certified under the city seal in a gold box not exceeding thirty pounds.

[9.] Certain of the Commons, setting forth that it has been customary to present the new Government of this kingdom with the freedom of this city in a gold box, that in regard of the great zeal and friendship of his excellency William CONOLLY, (speaker of House of Commons, Dublin, 1715) esquire, one of the lords justices of this kingdom, shewn in the house of commons and else where on all occasions in favour of this city in the late troubles, that as a mark of the citys gratitude, acknowledgment thereof, notwithstanding his former freedom, he should have the same certified in a gold box, and therefore pray the same be certified accordingly: ordered that his excellency William CONOLY, esquire, one of the lords justices of Ireland, have his freedom certified under the city seal in a gold box not exceedingthirty pounds

(m 54.)
[10.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that the committee appointed for regulating the tolls and customs had made the following report, and prayed to make the same an act of assembly, and to continue the committee or appoint a new one, which report is as followeth : –
Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inspect into the city tolls and customs, have made further inquiry into the same, and have ordered Mr. PEPPARD to lay the charter of the three penny customs and the act of parliament before Mr. Recorder, to have his opinion in writing thereon as to the citys right in receiving the said three penny customs, which by reason of the shortness of time we have not as yet received, and therefore think it proper that the said committee be continued or a new one appointed; we have likewise made some further inquiry into the petty customs, but have not brought the same to a conclusion; there is a new toll house built at Stephens Green, and some other toll houses are repaired: which we submit to your honour’s this 29th April, 1717 : ,
Ordered that the report be confirmed and the committee continued.

[11.] Alderman Anthony BARKEY is elected Lord Mayor for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next.

[12.] Mr. John REYSON and Mr. Vincent KIDDER are elected Sherriffs for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next.

(m. 57) Admissions to franchise. ”

1717. July 19.- Fourth Friday after 24 June.
[1.] Richard LOVE, officer at mace, having petitioned to surrender his imployment: ordered that he be discharged.

(Roll xix m. 59b)
[2.] William LEECH having petitioned for said imployment : ordered that William LEECH be admitted officer at. mace in the room of Richard LOVE during citys pleasure, and giving bonds to indempnifie the city.

[3.] Richard WEST, Rowland PARKER, Gilbert KELLY and Mathew BOWEN, city adjutants, praying consideration for their services and time spent in exercising the militia : ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay them twenty pounds, sterling, five pounds each to be allowed on account.

[4. ] John COLCOTT, setting forth that by act of assembly in the Mayoralty of sir Michael MITCHELL, John MORRISON, then keeper of Newgate, was obliged to pay him ten pounds per annum daring the said COLCOTTs life, and paid the same till the said MORRISON died, and after his death, John SAUNDERSON, present keeper of Newgate, agreed to pay the petitioner the same before he was admitted into the said imploy, and paid the same, and prays that SAUNDERSON’s successor may be obliged to pay the said annuity as formerly: ordered that the petitioner be paid ten pounds per annum by half yearly payments by the gaoler of Newgate.

[5.] Peter DESMYNIERES, son to Peter DESMYNIERES, who served Lord Mayor, (John DESMYNIERES was Lord Mayor of Dublin 1666, 67. Lewis DESMYNIERES held that office in 1669-70.) praying relief, having wife and children: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner six pounds, sterling, per annum, half yearly, to commence from Easter last, the same to continue during the citys pleasure, or till he is otherwise provided for.

[6.] Samuel ORD, mace bearer, praying consideration for the loss of perquisites which his predecessors had ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner ten pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed on his accounts, and that the petitioner apply no more.

[7.] Jane BROOKS, widow of John BROOKS, late peruke maker, and one of the numbers of this city, praying relief for two children her late husband had by a former wife: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay six pounds, sterling, for putting out the said two children to trades as he shall think fit, to be allowed the same on his accounts.

(m. 59b)
[8.] Joseph FALKINER, praying the citys charity, being reduced: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioner six: pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[9.] Certain of the commons, praying to inlarge the assembly: ordered that the assembly be inlarged till nine a clock.

[10.] Robert KING, gentleman, praying to be admitted King city attorney: ordered that he be admitted during citys pleasure.

[11.] The committee of directors for the proprietors of the North Strand, praying further time to prepare a draught of the fee farm deed: ordered that the time be inlarged to the next assembly.

[12.] William OAKLY having formerly petitioned and set forth that the petitioner is tenant to the city for a house situate at the Old Bridge foot, built on one of the arches of the said Bridge, which house is very much out of repair and untenantable in the winter time, occasioned by danke coldes that arise through the floor of the same; that he is willing to rebuild the said house provided he could obtain a lease and leave to enlarge the said house frontwards as far as the arch runs, which he humbly proposes to do without interrupting the water course, praying the same to be taken into consideration, which petition. was referred to a committee, who made the following report :

Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly (Roll xix m. 59b)
To us directed, we have viewed and surveyed the within premises, and are of opinion that the petitioner have a lease of the same, together with an addition on the north side thereof to the first pier of the Old Bridge, containing in front thereof seventeen feet, and in depth eastward, to the extent of the said house, twenty one foot; that he do not obstruct the passage of the water through the arch ; that he pay twelve pounds, sterling, per annum for the term of ninety nine years, payable half yearly on every Easter and every Michaelmas, capons to the Lord Mayor, and ten shillings, on the perfection of the leases, to the Poor house, for the use of the poor; a map of the old tenement together with the new addition is hereunto annexed:
Thomas BOLTON, William EMPSON, David KING, William QUAYLE, Francis ARMSTEED : ,

Ordered that the petitioner have a lease pursuant to the committees report; leases to be drawn as Mr. Recorder shall advise, and the rent of twelve pounds do commence from Michaelmas next, the petitioner paying and discharging his present rent to that time.

[13.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 19th of July, 1717 :
That we have since our last report laid and filled with stones on the north side of the channel 258 kishes, and are laying more: ‘ Ordered to proceed.-Allowed.
‘ That we have drove on the South .Bull above, three hundred piles with the old engine, in three rows, and are filling between them with stones and hurdles:
Ordered to proceed.-Allowed.

‘The new engine is now finished; and we hope to have (m.58) it at work next week; if so, we design it to drive the long piles, and the old one the short piles, by which means the work on the South Bull will go on with better speed than it has done, if money comes in fast enough to keep them at work: ‘ Ordered to proceed.-Allowed.
We do find that of twenty seven gabbards and four Gabwherries, which are said to belong to Mr. John MERCER, and do not pay their dues to the Office, Mr. Thomas HOLT, one of the Office surveyors, has an interest in, and part of, sixteen of the said gabbards and three of the said wherries, and are of opinion that the said Mr. HOLT ought to pay the Office for them: ‘ Ordered that Mr. HOLT pay the whole where he is a partner.-Allowed.
‘There are other owners of gabbards, etc., that are come-atable who refuse to pay the office dues, whom we have ordered to be prosecuted before my Lord Mayor, according to the act of parliament: ‘ Ordered to proceed. -Allowed.
‘ We have agreed with one Mr. CALDWELL, a merchant, for two hundred tun of oak timber, fit for piles, at two pounds thirteen shillings per tun, to be delivered by fifty tun at a time, the first fifty this month, and the last in December, next: ‘ granted.-Allowed.
On a malicious report being spread by some people that the Ballast Office had occasioned the bar to rise much higher than it formerly was, we caused the same to be sounded, and do find that the said report is not only false and groundless, but that the bar, by keeping the channel clear and suffering the water to have a full current against it, is much lower than it formerly was, as may appear by the annexed chart: ‘ Ordered that the directors of the Ballast Office do publish the same: -Allowed.

‘An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed: all which is humbly submitted to this honorable assembly:
Mathew PEARSON – Thomas CURTIS -Thomas SOMERVELLE -Joseph KANE -William EMPSON – William ASTON – James KING -William MAPLE -Philip COOLEY’.

Roll xix m. 58
An abstract Of the Ballast Office accounts, from the 4th day of May 1717, exclusive to the 18th of July, 1717 inclusive.

Ballast Office Dr.
To cash received from ships etc., from the 2nd May 1717, exclusive to the 18th July, 1717, inclusive £735 4s. 0d.
Deduct: £550 6s. 9 ½ d.
Balance in Office £ 184 17s. 2 ½ d.
Besides in Messrs Burton and Harrisons hands £550 0s. 0d
Total in cash: £734 17s. 2 ½ d

N.B. That there are several debts due and growing due from the Office which when paid will sink a considerable part of the above cash.

Per Contra Cr.
By balance of the accounts due to the 2nd May, 1717 inclusive £44 6s. 0 1/2d
By sundry disbursements on the Office account, from the 4th May 1717, exclusive to the 18th July 1717 inclusive £506 0s 9d

Total £550 6s. 9 ½ d.

Admissions to Franchise (m. 60)

September 21.-Post assembly. (m.61.)
Certain of the commons, setting forth that the committee to whom the inspection of the management of the city lights were referred, have made the following report, and prayed the same might be made an act of assembly, which report is as followeth :
“Pursuant to your honours order of last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inspect into the management of the city lights, have accordingly met, and think it proper that there should be lights placed on the dead walls at the same distance as in the streets, and lights fixed on the four bridges, videlicet, Essex Bridge, Ormonde Bridge, the Old Bridge and Elliss’ Bridge, one in the middle and one at each end of every bridge, to continue burning all night, all the lamps to be of the same white glass mentioned in the present act, the lamps to be lighted at five o’clock in the evening, and to continue burning till one of the clock next morning ; that a penalty be laid on those who shall break the said lights, or carry away the lanthorns or the irons which hold the same, and upon those who shall hinder the lamp men from lighting the said lamps; that the present light man do deliver up all the lanthorns to the city when they shall require or demand the same, to be all in good repair and glazed with white glass as aforesaid, as by the said act is directed; that the said act is now near expired, and that application be made to the present parliament for continuing the said act in the city, with such other directions as your honours shall think fit ;’ Ordered that the said report be confirmed and referred to Mr. Recorder and Mr. Alderman BURTON, the city representatives in parliament, to act therein as they shall think proper.-Allowed.

1717. October 18. –Third Friday after September 29.
Lord Mayor: Anthony BARKEY ; Sheriffs: John REYSON and Vincent KIDDER.

[1.] Samuel COOKE; clerk to the right honorable the Lord Mayor, praying an allowance as usual for his Lordship to support the dignity of the Mayoralty: ordered that the treasurer do, on the said Lord Mayors warrant, pay to the petitioner for his Lordships use Pay the sum of five hundred pounds, sterling, one moietie to be paid at Christmas next and the other moietie at midsummer next, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[2.] Samuel COOKE, praying a consideration for his trouble and services as clerk to the commissioners of array of the horse and foot militia of the city of Dublin, for four or five years past: ordered that the petitioner be paid by the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, the sum of forty pounds, sterling, for his services [stated] in his said petition, the same to be allowed the treasurer on account.

[3.] James CATHCART, clerk, setting forth that by the promotion of Mr. BULKLY, present city chaplain, the said (m. 63) chaplainship will now become vacant, and therefore prays the citys favour in being admitted city chaplain : ordered that the petitioner be admitted city chaplain during the citys pleasure, with the usual salary.

[4. ] Mary AUSTIN, widow, praying to be admitted one of the city poor widows, in the room of her sister ; ordered that the petitioner be admitted and allowed three pounds per annum, to be paid quarterly during the citys pleasure.

[5.] Ann COSSART, setting forth that she is the widow of alderman David COSSART, deceased, and that she is in her fortune much reduced since his decease, and praying an annual allowance for her relief and subsistence : ordered that the petitioner be paid thirty pounds per annum, half yearly, by the treasurer, the payment to commence from Michaelmas last, and to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[6.] Charles MATHEWS, praying to be admitted city scavengeer for the south side of the river Anna Liffy, for one year from the expiration of Mr. ALLEN’S time, to enter into such articles as Mr. Recorder shall advise to have the same salary as Mr. ALLEN lately had.

[7. ] Thomas PILKINGTON, praying to be continued in his employment of city scavenger of that part of this city lying on the north part of the river Anna Liffy: ordered that the petitioner be continued in his employment for one year longer, to commence from the expiration of his present term.

[8.] David DUNBARR, esquire, setting forth that it was proposed that the city should contribute forty Pounds to cover with an arched shore a nuisance on the north side of Lazy hill; that he had contracted with Mr. Nicholas CARTER to make the same, and therefore prays the said forty pounds may be paid to the said Nicholas CARTER: ordered that the said Nicholas CARTER be paid the sum of forty pounds when the work is finished, and the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[9.] The committee of directors for the proprietors of the North Strand, setting forth that there is now due from each proprietor fifty shillings, and pray the payment of the same may be postponed; that the deeds are not ingrossed, and pray further time to perfect the same, etc. : ordered that further time be given for the perfecting the deeds of fee farm within mentioned for the proprietors of the North Strand, and that the payment of the fifty shillings from each proprietor be postponed till Christmas next, and that whatsoever is necessary further to be inserted in the said deed, to be referred to the committee for the said Strand.

[10] Certain Commons, praying to inlarge the assembly :- ordered that the assembly be inlarged till nine o’clock.

[11.] Certain commons, setting forth that his majestie king George, upon his seasonable and happy accession to the crown of these realms, having confirmed to this city its ancient rights and privileges, which had been invaded and almost subverted by the illegal and arbitrary measures taken by Sir Constantine PHIPPS, and also honoured it with many distinguishing marks of his royal favour, and particularly in sending over his royal picture to this city, and placing upon the establishment of this kingdom the sum of three hundred pounds per annum in augmentation of the city revenues, to the end that they of this city may in some measure express and perpetuate their gratitude for So many and great benefits they daily enjoy under his majesties most gracious protection; and therefore pray that a statue of his most sacred majestie king George may be erected in honour of his majestie, and placed in such convenient part of this city as to this city shall be thought most proper for that purpose: ordered that to perpetuate, as far as in us lies, the many distinguishing marks of his majesties royal bounty conferred upon the city, and the inestimable blessings we daily enjoy under his majesties most auspicious government, and as a lasting monument of that profound veneration with which our hearts are so justly filled for his most sacred of maiestie our second deliverer, a statue be erected in this city, and that the right honourable the Lord Mayor, Sherriffs, treasurer, Sir John ROGERSON, aldermen BURTON, sir John ECCLES, CURTIS, SURDEVILLE and PORTER, and twelve of the commons, to be named by the commons, or any seven of them, whereof the Lord Mayor and one of the Sherriffs to be always two, are appointed a committee to consider of a proper place within this city for erecting the same in, and to treat with some skilful and able statuary in Great Britain or this kingdom for such statue, and to report their proceedings to the next assembly: [Commons :Sir Nathaniel WHITWELL, Joseph KANE, Humphry FRENCH, Peter VERDOEN, William ALDRICH, William EMPSON, Joseph WALKER, John MEAKINGS, Christopher INCH, Jeremiah PEPYAT, Edward DUDGEON, John WRIGHT.

[12.] Jeremiah PEPYAT, city stationer, having formerly petitioned that he was apprehensive that it would be necessary that a committee should be appointed to examine his accounts for the year ending Michaelmas next, and to report their opinion to the next assembly, and prayed that a committee may be accordingly appointed, and a committee was thereupon appointed, who made the following report :
“Pursuant to your honours order of last assembly, we have viewed and examined the petitioners accounts, and are of opinion that he be paid in full of the said account fifty nine pounds, eighteen shillings, and one penny, sterling, which we submit to your honours this 11th day of October, 1717 : ‘ and having this assembly petitioned and prayed that the said report may be confirmed and made an act of this assembly: it is therefore ordered that the said report be confirmed and made an act of this assembly.

[13.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 18th of October, 1717 :
Roll xix. M 62
‘In our last we gave your honours an account that there were three hundred piles driven on the South Bull, since which there are 567 piles more driven on the same in three rows, and part of the intervals between the said rows filled with stones, and the rest afilling as fast as the weather will allow; the said row contains a length from east to west about thirty eight perches. The charge in driving and filling between the said piles, when finished, will amount to above six hundred pounds over and above what the timber cost, which amounts to above three hundred pounds more, so that the whole charge of the said piles will amount to nine hundred pounds:’ ordered to be considered next assembly-
‘The season of the year will not permit the engines to work any longer this winter, and the next spring it may be considered whether or no your honours will think fit to carryon the said work.
“We have laid and filled with stones on the North Strand this summer four hundred kishes, and stopped the gap that was formerly laid open at the request of Sir John ROGERSON, and are going on in laying and filling more kishes on the Strand, and have bought five hundred kishes for that use, part of which are already laid and filled ‘ ordered to proceed as the season will permit.
‘There is some progress made in filling the City Keay, and that work going on at all times when the gabbards can be spared from the office work :’ ordered to continue the work till finished.
‘Of the two hundred tun of timber, reported in our last to be bought, we have yet received but twenty odd tuns.
‘We have taken a yard at Ringsend, to lay timber and other materials belonging to the Office in, at seven pounds ten shillings per annum, much nearer the work than the former yards, and more commodious than the said two yards which we before had at fifteen pounds pet annum : approved of.

Roll xix. m.62
‘An abstract of the cash is hereunto annexed: all which is humbly submitted to this honorable assembly: Thomas BOLTON – Math. PEARSON -Thomas CURTIS – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William MAPLE – William ASTON -Joseph KANE – James KING -Philip COOLEY – William EMPSON -Peter VERDOEN -Thomas STRINGER’
An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the (m.62b). 18th of July, 1717, exclusive, to the 17th day of October, 1717, inclusive :
Ballast Office. Dr.
To balance of accounts to the 18th By sundry disbursements on the
day of July, 1717, inclusive £184 17s. 2 ½ d.
To cash received from ships, etc., 18th July to the 17th October, 1717, inclusive
£738 12s. 7d.
To cash received from Messrs. Burton and Harrison £200 0s. 0d.
Total £1123 9s. 9 ½ d.
Deduct £1093 16s 5 ½ d.
Balance in Office £29 13s. 4d.
Besides in Messrs. Burton and Harrisons hands. .£350 0s. 0d.

Per Contra, Cred.
By sundry disbursements on the Office Account from 18th July, 1717 exclusive to the 17th October 1717 inclusive £1038 19s. 6d.
By money expended since the 18th July 1717, in filling and backing the City Kay on the city account £54 16s. 11d.
Total: £1093 16s. 5d.

m. 64
Admissions to Franchise

m. 66
1717[-18.] January 17.- Fourth Friday after 25 December, 1717.

[1.]Lord Mayor and Sherriffs, aldermen BOLTON, Sir John ROGERSON, WALTON, Sir John ECCLES, PLEASANT, QUAYLE, FORBES, SURDEVILLE, SOMERVILLE, and eighteen of the commons, to be named by the commons, or any nine of them, whereof the Lord Mayor and one of the Sherriffs to be always two, are appointed auditors of the city accounts for the last year :
[The eighteen of the commons: ] Joseph KANE, Major ALDRICH, Charles HENDRICK, James SOMERVILLE, – Henry GLEGG, John SHAW, Thomas GLEDSTAINES, James STEVENSON, David LATOUCH, Major VERDOEN, Samuel CARD, John MEAKINS, Joseph WALKER, Anthony ALLEN, James ESDALE, Timothy DOW[TON], Edward DUDGEON, Terence REA.

[2.] William EMPSON and David KING, late Sherriffs, are appointed masters of the city works for the ensuing year.

[3.] Committee of the water course: :~
Lord Mayor and Sherriffs, and twelve of the Commons, to be named by the commons, or any nine of them, whereof the Lord Mayor and one, of the Sherriffs to be always two, are appointed a committee to view the water course: everyone of the committee to have timely notice of their meeting.
[The twelve of the commons :] Joseph Kane, Richard Blair, Peter Verdoen, William Milton, Charles Hendrick, James Somerville, Hugh Cuming, George Cholmondly,
Thomas Cogan – James Esdall, Joseph Walker, John Paine:

[4.] Mark Henry Blackhall, setting forth that he is the son of George Blackhall, who served Lord Mayor and treasurer of this city for several years, and that [he is now] by several mischances much reduced, and therefore praying some provision in the city for his support : ordered that the petitioner be paid eight pounds per annum, to be paid quarterly, and to commence from Christmas last, during citys pleasure.

[5.] Margaret Stoughton, setting forth that she is the daughter of George Stoughton, who formerly lived in a plentiful condition, upon whose death your petitioners mother had ten pounds per annum during her life settled on her by the city, which ten pounds was the main support as well of the petitioner as of her mother, now deceased, and therefore prays the citys charity and consideration: ordered that the petitioner be paid the sum of five pounds per annum, the same to be paid half yearly, and the same to commence from Christmas last.

[6.] Edward Foreman, setting forth that he has been a freeman of this city of Dublin upwards of fifty four years, and has served the city in the capacity of clerk (Roll xix, m. 66) Clerk to the market upwards of twenty years, and faithfully and honestly discharged his duty; that through great age and weakness he is now incapable of serving himself or the city, and therefore praying the citys charity and consideration: ordered that the petitioner be paid ….. shillings now and four pounds per annum, the same to be paid quarterly, to commencing from Christmas last, during the citys pleasure.

[7] James Tasker, by his petition, setting forth that he is an antient inhabitant of this city and freeman of the same, and is now so reduced that he cannot subsist without the citys charity, and therefore prays the citys charity and consideration: ordered that the petitioner be paid the sum of four pounds a year, to be payable quarterly, and the same to commence from Christmas last, during the citys pleasure, arid further that the treasurer do pay him twenty shillings this present assembly.

[8] Maurice Fitzmaurice, praying to be admitted city attorney: granted during citys pleasure.

[9.] James Ramsey, praying to be city surveyor, for that he served his apprenticeship with Mr. Joseph Moland, late in that imployment, now deceased: ordered that the petitioner be admitted city surveyor during the citys pleasure.

[l0.] Certain of the commons, praying to enlarge the assembly till nine of the clock: ordered accordingly.

[11] The committee of directors for the proprietors of the North Strand, setting forth that there is now become due from the proprietors of the North Strand the sum of fifty shillings each, as per act of assembly, for fencing out the sea and carrying on the work; and desire the said payment of fifty shillings, sterling, may be postponed till midsummer next, by reason of the deeds not being as yet perfected; ordered accordingly; and whereas by former order the first payment was to be made at Christmas: it is now ordered that the first payment be made at midsummer next, pursuant to the prayer of the within petition.

[12.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that Richard Jones, gentleman, has preferred a bill in the high court of chancery against several persons, and has made the Lord Mayor, Sherriffs, commons and citizens of this city defendants in the said bill, and likewise with others they are made defendants to a bill preferred by David Elwood against lord Lanesborough, and praying that Mr, Recorder may draw the answers, and that the same be put under the city seal: ordered that Mr. Recorder do draw answers to the said bills, and the same to be put under the city seal.

Comment: Taken from “The Calendar of the Assembly Rolls of the Corporation of the City of Dublin”. Extracts from the Rolls of 1717.

Dublin Assembly Rolls, 1716

The Dublin City Assembly Rolls record the Minutes of the Dublin City Assembly (council) from 1441 to 1841. Transcriptions of these rolls exist as the ‘Calendar of Ancient Records of Dublin’. The calendars record a lot of the history of Dublin city, construction of the Bull Wall, the various prisons. Names given are not just those of the councilmen (aldermen, Sheriffs etc) but of ordinary people. Petitions were made to the council for monetary support. The index on this page lists the surnames found on the various abstracts on this web site and the manuscript number as given in the calendar transcription. Abstracts from a number of years are covered and it is hoped that more will be added to this web site.

Article: Roll xix. M. 37.
1716. April 13.-Second Friday after Easter 1716. (Easter Day 1st April, 1716)

[1.] Daniel COOKE, servant to the Right Honorable the Lord Mayor, setting forth that his Lordship has been at extraordinary expence on his coming into the new house, as also by reason of a new government in his Lordships time of Mayoralty, a parliament likewise sitting and the franchises to be rid and therefore prays an augmentation for his Lordships use: it is thereupon ordered that the treasurer of the city do pay to the petitioner, on the Lord Mayors warrant for his Lordships use, four hundred pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[2.] Jacob PEPPARD, esquire, setting forth that John PORTER and John TISDALL, esquires, present Sheriffs, by reason of the change of the government of this kingdom, and the sitting of a parliament this year, are considerable losers, the profits of the office not bearing half their expence, and praying an allowance: it is therefore ordered that the treasurer of the city do pay to the petitioner, on the Lord Mayors warrant, for the use of the present Sheriffs, two hundred pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

Roll xix.37
[3. ] Benjamin BURTON, esquire, in behalf of himself and the rest of the officers belonging to his regiment militia horse, setting forth that the trophy money, which this honorable city has already granted the said regiment, has fallen very short of the necessary trophies which belong to such a regiment, as per the following account :
For six trumpets at six pounds each £36
For six trumpet banners and two standards £75
For kettle-drum and banners £25
For two standard staffs £3
For seven housings and six pair of bags for the trumpets and kettle drummer £4 12s.
For seven livery coats for the trumpeters and kettle drummer £62 8s.
For repairing the arms got out of the stores £47
For hats laced for the trumpeters and kettle drummer £3 10s
For cutting swords for said regiment, 30 to each troop, at 7s. per sword. £63
For two hundred and forty carbine belts at five shillings each £60
Total: £379 10s.

And therefore prays a consideration: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioner for the use in the petition motioned, the sum of two hundred ninety nine pounds ten shillings, sterling, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

(m. 37 b.)

[4.] William QUAILE, alderman, setting forth that last assembly he obtained of the city a lease of lives renewable for ever of the ‘Three wolfs heads,’ in High street, but that Mr. MAPAS, the present tenant, whose time is not quite expired, refuses to attorn or come to reasonable terms for such his small time therein, which renders the lease for lives impracticable, and therefore prays a fee farm instead of the lease for lives, on a reasonable fine in lieu of the casual fines: ordered that the petitioner have a fee farm of the premises at twenty pounds per annum rent, and to pay to the treasurer, for the use of the city, thirty pounds as a fine, the rent to commence from Easter, 1719, and paying ten shillings to the Poor House for the use of the poor. Deeds to be drawn as Mr. Recorder shall advise.

[5.] William BAYLY having petitioned for further recompence for past services done the city, and a gratuity for what he is now doing and is to do: ordered that the treasurer do pay to the petitioner thirty pounds, sterling, on the Lord Mayors warrant, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[6.] On the petition of Bucknall TOTTIE, setting forth Tottie. that her father was Lord Mayor (Sir John TROTTY, Lord Mayor, 1671-2) that on the citys account he was imprisoned in London; that he died poor by reason of his sufferings on the city account; that the tithes of Rathdrum were set to one who broke, and is Rathdrum now in gaole for the arrears: which petition was referred, and the committee made the following report, “Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly, Report. we have examined the contents of the petition, and are of opinion that the petitioner be remitted the arrears of rent due out of the premises to the city till Michaelmas last, and that the petitioner is a fit object for the citys favour, 5th of April, 1716”

And having petitioned this assembly to have said report made an act of assembly: Ordered: That the arrears of rent be remitted the petitioner according to the above report.

[7] Certain of the commons, setting forth that James Butler, the late duke of Ormonde, is attainted of high treason, and actually in rebellion, and pray that the Butlers’ arms, on the front of the Tholsell, may therefore be taken down or defaced: ordered that the said arms be taken down.

[8] Certain of the commons, setting forth that it is customary for the City to present the secretaries of State with the freedom of the city; that the right honorable Martin BLADEN, esquire, hath not received that compliment as yet, and pray he may: ordered that the freedom of this city be presented to Mr. Secretary Bladen in a silver box, as usual, the expence thereof to be paid by the treasurer and allowed him on his accounts.

[9.] Certain of commons, setting forth, the same in behalfe of Mr. Secretary DELAFAY, and praying the like compliment may be paid him ordered that Mr. Secretary Delafay be presented with the freedom of this city in a silver box, the expence to be paid by the treasurer and allowed him on his accounts.

m. 36

[10.] Certain of the commons, praying to inlarge the assembly: ordered that the assembly be inlarged till nine o’clock.

[11] Richard GOODENOUGH, praying to be admitted city attorney: granted during the citys pleasure.

[12.] On the petition of Ann DENHAM, setting forth that she is the widow of Thomas Denham, Sheriff of Dublin in 1694-5) who was one of the Sheriffs of this city; that by reason of her great age she cannot now well subsist on the allowance of ten pounds per annum, formerly granted her by this honorable city, and prays an additional allowance: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioner ten pounds sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[13.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 13th April, 1716 :
Report. “Since our last report we have some more timber come in, and expect the remainder of our agreement for two hundred tun, with Captain ROGERS, every day, and likewise a quantity of kishes are soon expected. And it being now a proper season not only to go on with the pileing below Ringsend, as formerly proposed, but also to carry the bank of kishes up towards Mourneys dock, we intend to go on with the said work with all expedition, according’ to the best advice we can get.’ Ordered to proceed with all expedition.- Allowed.

“Pursuant to the order of last assembly, we have advised with council about removing the heaps of small stones which lye in the channel, laid down there by Mr.VERNON, which opinion we have hereunto annexed for your honors directions how to proceed therein.” Ordered to follow the councils advice and pursue his opinion.- Allowed.

The city wall between Mr. MERCER and ir John Rogersons keay being now a building, and the receiver general having signified to us that, the city is at present out of cash, therefore desires that the Ballast Office should advance the money for carrying on the said work, and that the city will repay the same when in cash, or when the office shall have occasion for the same, which we are willing to do, provided this honorable assembly approves thereof: Approved of.- Allowed.

We have prepared an abstract of all the receipts and Receipts. payments of the Ballast Office from the first of May, Payment 1713, inclusive, to the first of November, 1715, exclusive, in order to have the city seal affixed to it, that the said abstract may be laid before the Government, as the act of parliament directs: Ordered to be sealed and presented to the Government,- Allowed.

In the first abstract laid before their excellencies the lords justices and council, in the year 1710, it was therein mentioned that the city expended £484 5s. 2 1/2 d. in obtaining the act for the Ballast Office, which was reserved to their further considerations. We desire your honours directions if you think it proper to be mentioned in the abstract now to be laid before the Government and council.’ Ordered: the £484 5s. 2id., to be mentioned in the abstract, to be presented as above, an that the City petition the lords ,justices and council for the allowance thereof to the city out of the Ballast Office.- Allowed.

An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed: All which is humbly submitted to this honourable assembly:
Signed Thomas BOLTON, Mathew PEARSON, Thomas CURTIS, John PORTER, Jos. KANE, Thomas STRINGER, William EMPSON, William ASTON, Edward SURDEVIL

Roll XIXm.36b.

An abstract of, the Ballast Office accounts from the 18th day of January, 1715[16] exclusive, to the 12th day of April, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office, Dr-
To balance of accounts to the 18th January, 1715[-16] inclusive £36 11s. 2d.
To cash received from 18th January, exclusive, to 12th April, inclusive £627 9s. 5d.

Total £664 0s. 7d.

Deduct payments. £557 8s. 10d.
Balance in the Office £106 11s. 9d.
Besides in Messrs. BURTON and HARRISONs hands, as per account £2530 0s. 0d.
Total in cash £2636 11s. 1d.

Per contra. Cred.
By sundry disbursements on the Office account from the 18th January,
1715[-16], exclusive, to the 12th April, inclusive. £557 8s. 10d.

[14.] [Case for advice and opinion of counsel.]
By an act passed in the late queens time for erecting a Ballast Office in the city of Dublin, the Lord Mayor, Sheriffs, commons and citizens of the city of Dublin are constituted keepers and conservators of the port of Dublin. They have made a lease to Sir John ROGERSON of a piece of ground on the south side 0£ the channel, which Sir John Rogerson was obliged to inclose : Sir John Rogerson, in order to carry on the work, has contracted with one VERNON, (of Clontarf, Co. Dublin) to furnish him with stones. Vernon has laid down a great quantity of them on the north side of Sir John Rogersons wall, by Sir Johns directions, as Vernon alleges, and within the channel. Sir John Rogerson has taken what stones he thought were fit for his use, and has left the rest : Vernon alleges that Sir John was to take both small and great stones as they rise out of the quarry, and therefore refuses to remove them, by which means they continue in the channel and area very great nuisance to our shipping.

Query: How is the city to remove them? And whether against Sir John Rogerson or Vernon, or both? or whether the city may not remove them of their own authority without apprehending any law suit from Vernon?

[Opinion:] , Every navigable river is a high road, and any person whatsoever may remove whatsoever is thrown into it that obstructs the passage, and the city may, without all doubt, as conservators of the river and port of Dublin, reform this nuisance, and are obliged to do it, and Vernon, or the persons who throw in the stones, may be proceeded against by indictment or presentment.

But the most expeditious method of proceeding against them is by an act made in the sixth year of the late queen for erecting a Ballast Office, by which any person who has thrown any rubbish into the river, upon conviction upon oath before the Lord Mayor, or any justice of the city or county at large, is to forfeit five shillings to the informer, to be levied by distress and sale of his goods.

m.35.
Though the city may remove the stones, yet the property continues still in sir John Rogerson or Vernon, and though the city may remove them and throw them out of the channel on the banks, yet I am of opinion they cannot hinder those who have the property from taking them again.

I am of opinion that the city have no reason to apprehend any law suit either from Sir John Rogerson or Vernon for removing those Stones, for if there should be any clause in sir Johns lease that he may lay stones for building his walls in the channel of the river, yet they must be removed in convenient time, and not suffered to lye there longer than is absolutely necessary,

Dated and signed: April the 9th, 1716.-Thomas Marlay.(Note : Appointed Chief Justice, King’s Bench, Ireland 1741)

m.35 cont’d

[15.] Alderman Thomas PLEASANTS is elected Lord Mayor for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next.

[16.] Mr. Thomas SOMERVILL and Mr. William EMPSON are elected Sherriffs for the said year, commencing as aforesaid.

[17.]Alderman Thomas PLEASANTS, after his approbation by the Government, applied to the Lord Mayor and aldermen to be excused from undergoing the Mayoralty: he was excused accordingly.22nd May, 1716.

[18.] Alderman Thomas BOLTON is elected Lord Mayor for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next.

[19.] Mr. Thomas SOMERVILLE, having applied to the Lord Mayor and aldermen to be excused from-serving as one of the Sherriffs for the ensuing year, he was excused accordingly.-9th June, 1716.

[20.] Mr. David KING is elected Sherriff for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next, instead of Mr. Thomas SOMERVILLE

m.38 Admissions to franchise.

m.39
1716. June 9
[I.] Upon the petition of Thomas BULKLEY, clerk, setting forth that the living of Rathdrum, in the county of Wicklow, is become vacant by the removal of Charles WATTS, late incumbent of the said living and praying the city to grant him a presentation to the same under the city seal: ordered that the petitioner have a presentation to the said living under the city seal.

Roll XIX m.39
[2.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that his majesty, with God Almightys assistance, the wisdom of his council, and success of his arms, has seasonably suppressed the late horrid rebellion fomented in Great Britain, and that it is the duty of this city to address his majesty thereon ; that Mr. Recorder has prepared the following address, and pray that the same be the address of this city, and sent to his majesty under the city seal : ordered that the same be the address of this city, and sent to his majestie under the city seal :
“To the kings most excellent majesty:
The humble address of the Lord Mayor, Sherriffs, Commons and citizens of the city of Dublin, at an assembly held at the Tholsell of the said city on the 9th day of June, 1716 :
Most gracious sovereign:
We, your majesties most dutiful and loyal subjects, at this time humbly beg leave to approach your majestie with our hearty and sincere congratulations upon the happy success wherewith it has pleased Almighty God to bless your arms and councils, in suppressing the late horrid and unnatural rebellion in Great Britain, and frustrating the designs of your enemies, well knowing that the natural result of all attempts of this nature, when confounded and extinguished as this has been, must necessarily tend to the more firm establishment of that most just, mild and gracious government which your subjects everywhere enjoy under your majesty.
‘We are thoroughly convinced that all your majesties real interests are our own in the highest degree, and that the extirpation of the Protestant religion, and the subversion of our laws and liberties, must have been the unavoidable consequences of the late horrid attempt, raised and carried on by your majesties traitors and perjured subjects in favour of a Popish pretender, bred up in Romish superstition and arbitrary principles.
And, therefore, we of this city cheerfully lay hold of this opportunity of declaring our utmost detestation and abhorrence of the principles and practices of those of your majesties subject’s, whom neither your majesties goodness and unparalleled clemency can reconcile to your government, nor your power deter from their disloyalty, and do most humbly assure your majestie, with the profoundest sincerity, that we are ready to sacrifice our lives and our all in defence of your sacred person, which is so justly dear to us, and in support of your rightful and lawful title to the imperial throne of your ancestors, and of the succession in your royal house.
‘May all your majesties open and secret enemies, as well abroad as at home, be timely discovered, and all their projects and wicked devices against your majestie be brought to shame and confusion, while we shall ever rejoyce and glory in being ranked among the most dutiful, loyal and obedient of your majesties subjects :
‘In testimony whereof we have caused the common seal of the said city to be hereunto affixed.’

1716. July 20.- Fourth Friday after 24 June. (m. 42)
[1.] Certain of the commons setting forth that, for the honour of the city of Dublin, some more distinguishing mark of the citys favour should be placed on their late worthy Recorder (John FORSTER) than was formerly granted him, who, by his abilities, vigilance and steady adherence to the true interest of this city, was highly instrumental in preserving its liberties, to the neglect of his private affairs, and the considerable detriment of his own fortune; that in Christmas assembly, 1714, there was an order for five hundred pounds to be paid by him, which as yet he has not received, and therefore pray he may be rewarded in some other manner as most becoming the honour and dignity of this city, and the eminent services by him performed in defending the rights thereof : whereupon it is ordered as followeth: whereas by an (Roll xix.) act of assembly, of Christmas, 1714, it was ordered that the late Recorder, in consideration of his having faithfully stood by the rights and liberties of this city in times of extream danger, should be paid the sum of five hundred pounds sterling, as an acknowledgement of such his services, which sum has not as yet been paid him ; and certain of the Commons having this assembly prayed that he may be rewarded in some other manner for the same: it is therefore ordered that the said order as to the five hundred pounds be and is hereby discharged, and that in lieu thereof fifty pounds per annum of the rent payable by him to the city out of the lands of Dunakerny be remitted to the said late Recorder, the present lord chief justice Forster, during the remainder of the term his lordship has therein, from Michaelmas next ensuing.

[2.]On the petition of alderman Edward SURDEVILLE’s and Mrs. BRADSHAW, widow of Thomas BRADSHAW, alderman, deceased, setting forth that in the year 1703 the lower part of the Old Crane in Winetavern street was set by the city for fifty one years at fifteen pounds per annum, to be paid the Sherriffs of this city, and successors, at Michaelmas and Easter, and capons or five shillings, to the Lord Mayor, with clause of distress and re-entry; that petitioner served from Michaelmas, 1712, to Michaelmas, 1713, and thereby [is] intituled to a years rent, being fifteen pounds, but could not get the same from RYDER, Who lately held the Crane, nor JONES, who now has it, and therefore pray relief by the citys compelling RYDER or JONES to pay them, or by distress or re-entry, and by allowing them the rent for the year commencing 1713: ordered that the contents of the petition relating to the weigh house be referred to Mr.Recorder, to order such proper measures for recovery of the rent thereof as he shall think fit, and that the petitioner be impowered to receive all the Sherriffs rents that fell due for the year commencing Michaelmas, 1713.

[3.] On the petition of Samuel FAIRBROTHER, printer setting forth that the report and proceedings in relation (Roll xix. M 42b) to the election of magistrates for the city of Dublin, which was reported the 6th of June, 1716, in the house of commons, are now in the press, and he appointed to print the same, and prays incouragement from the city to so good a work: ordered that the petitioner be paid for two hundred of the reports (when finished) for each a British half crown, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his account, and that the said reports be distributed to the Lord Mayor, Sherriffs and Commons, and one to each corporation.

[4.] On a former petition of Joseph TININSON, setting City lights forth that he has been concerned in the city lights five years past; that he has faithfully discharged his office and has been a loser, by reason of the great rate oil bore and the frequent damage sustained by the breaking his lamps; that he is desirous to continue the said imploy, having oil mills of his own, which petition was referred to a committee, who made the following report :
We, the committee appointed to inquire about the city lights, are of opinion that Mr. Joseph TININSON is fit and proper person to be concerned in the management of the city lights for one year; that the same number of lights be continued as required by the act ; that four hundred of the lamps be glazed this year with glass. French or white glass by said TININSON ; that he begins to light on the 15th of September, -and continue to the 13th of April; that he begins to light each dark night at five o’clock, so as the light continues till one; that one light be placed at each end of the four bridges, and one in the middle of the same, to continue burning all night; that where there are dead walls and no houses built, the lights to be placed at the same distance as the act directs in the streets, and at the end of the said year all the lamps be delivered up by said Tininson, glazed as aforesaid, pursuant to the statute. And the said TININSON having now petitioned to have (m..41) the same report made an act of assembly, it is ordered accordingly, and that the lights and utensils be delivered up to the city next May, if they shall think proper, and that he shall enter into articles to perform the agreement in the report mentioned, as Mr. Recorder shall advise, the said Tininson receiving such profits for the same as are allowed by the statute in that case made and provided.

[5.] Upon a report of the standing committee for Stephens Green, and petition of certain of the commons to make the same an act of assembly: ordered that gravel be dug for the north walk when the season offers, and that Robert BELFORD oversees the work of the Green, the Green keepers to receive their orders from him, and he to provide such trees as are wanting, first giving my Lord Mayor notice from time to time, and that Mr. William DOBSON be on the said committee a commoner, in the room of Mr. Alderman SURDEVILLE.’

[6.] Rowland PARKER, Gilbert KELLY, Matthew BOWEN and Richard WEST, city adjutants, setting forth that by reason of their constant attendance in disciplining the city militia, they cannot mind their own private affairs, and praying a salary or further gratuity: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioners twenty pounds, sterling; five-pounds to each, and the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[7.] On the petition of Joseph PARSONS, setting forth that he is a freeman, and reduced to extreme poverty, having a wife and four children in a perishing condition, and prays relief and the citys charity: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner ten pounds towards his relief, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[8.] On petition of certain of the commons to enlarge the assembly: ordered the same be enlarged to nine o’clock.

Roll xix m. 41
[9.] On the petition of William BAYLY, praying a further consideration and gratuity for past services: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner twenty pounds, sterling, in consideration of his past services, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[10.] John DRAYCOTT, setting forth that he is a free-man and an attorney in the exchequer, and prays to be admitted an attorney of the Tholsel court: granted during the citys pleasure.

[11.] John WALSH, setting forth that he is a freeman and an attorney in the kings bench, and prays to be admitted an attorney of the Tholsel court of this city: granted during the citys pleasure.

[12.]The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 20th of July, 1716 :( m 41b)
‘That since the last assembly the ground on the south side the channel below Ringsend is staked out, according to the opinion of several merchants, and others skilled in the seafaring trade, in order to be piled; that one engine is sent for to Holland, another making here ; that as soon as they are ready, shall go on with driving the piles, according to the said opinions; that a man is sent for to Holland that shall be skilled in pileing, making of banks, and to have the overseeing and direction of the said work :’ ordered to proceed; the assembly agreeing to this paragraph.
‘That the kishes on the north side the channel are. now brought up to the land, as far as it is thought necessary, and will be so strong, when backed and finished, , as may prevent the floods from breaking through to the northward for the future, and keep the current in its right channel : the like order.
‘That the gabbards belonging to the Office being rather too few in number to carry on the several works now going on, and to supply the necessary occasions of the Office, have built a large float, carrying forty tuns at least, and cost £112 14s., to bring stones, etc., to the said works, or be otherwise imployed, as the directors shall think proper:’ ordered as before.

Roll xix, m. 41 b.
‘That the collecting the annual. rents due to the Ballast Office from gabbards, wherrys and boats, meets with difficulty, the arrear considerable and increase yearly for want of full power by the act to recover the same; and the city, having a power to make by laws by the said act, as they shall think fit and necessary for the good government of the said Office, propose that a by law be made, as Mr. Recorder shall advise, to oblige owners of gabbards, etc., that ply in the river to pay their rents more punctually than hitherto they have done :’ Ordered that Mr. Recorder be applyed to draw such by law as shall be proper.

Mr. Alderman SURDEVILLE continued one of the directors, as an alderman, and Mr. Peter Verdoen in his room as a commoner.

An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed, and humbly submitted to this honorable assembly :
‘Thomas BOLTON.- Mathew PEARSON.-Thomas CURTIS.- Edward SURDEVILLE.- John PORTER -William ASTON – Joseph KANE – Henry GLEGG – William EMPSON:

m. 40
An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts, from the 12th of April, 1716, exclusive, to the l0th of July, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office Dr.
To balance of accounts from 12th April 1716, inclusive £107 1s 9d
To cash received from the 12th April exclusive to 19th July 1716 inclusive… £1035 17s. 5d.
Total: £1142 19s. 2d
Deduct: £1093 7s. 10 1/2 d.

Balance in Office : £49 11s. 3 1/2 d.

Besides in Messrs Burton & Harrisons hands, as per account: £2133 16s. 8d.

Total: £2188 7 s. 11 1/2 d.

Per Contra
By sundry disbursements on the Office Account, from 12th April 1716, exclusive to 19th July 1716, inclusive £840 5s. 5 1/2 d.

By money expended in building the new city wall between Sir John Rogersons ground and Mr. Mercers, as per account £253 2s. 5d.
Total: £1093 7s. 10 1/2 d.
m. 46 con’t
[12.] On the petition of Daniel COOKE, gentleman, setting forth that the piece of ground on the Blind Key, whereon are three old houses formerly leased by the city of Dublin to Richard PROUDFOOT, is now by mesne assignment come to the petitioner, which lease being near expired and the aforesaid houses being very much out of repair, and ruinous and old, that he is desirous to become tenant to the city for the same after the expiration of the present lease, and prays a lease of the premises, which petition was referred to a committee, who made the following report : Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly to us directed, we have viewed and surveyed the within preinises and do find that the same contain in front to the Blind Key seventy-two foot, fronting the river seventy-six foot, on the west end forty-eight foot, and on the east end forty-seven foot, and we are of opinion that the within petitioner have a lease of the said premises, he leaving out nine foot of the forty-eight in breadth backwards towards the key next the river Liffy, whenever he rebuilds the aforesaid premises, which will make the said key in all twenty-five foot broad, as may appear by the annexed survey, for the term of ninety and nine years, to commence from Michaelmas, 1722, being the expiration of the old lease, at the yearly rent of fifteen pounds four shillings, and capons to the Lord Mayor, the rent to be paid half-yearly, at every Easter and every Michaelmas, to the treasurer for the citys use, and paying ten shillings on perfection of the lease for the use of the Poor House.’
Ordered that the petitioner have a lease of the premises within mentioned, pursuant the committees report, with such clauses as Mr. Recorder shall advise. Leases to be perfected next assembly.
[13.] Certain of the commons, having petitioned and set forth that the committee appointed to inspect into the hide markets, and to find out a proper place for selling hides, have made the following report, and pray the same may be made an act of assembly, videlicet :
‘Pursuant to your honours order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inquire for convenient places for hide markets, are of opinion that where the potatoes are now frequently sold on the. Key near Ormonde Bridge will be a fit place for a hide market, and that it may be made in length and breadth so large as can conveniently, to be inclosed by a, wall of (Roll xix m 45.) seven foot high next the street, and the wall next the river to be raised to the same height; that the market be flagged and a conveniency made to carry off the water, the slip to be made up, and that posts and rails with tenter hooks may be placed within the yard, in such manner as will contain the hides of the markets; that a pump be fixed in the yard, and doors and gates be placed therein. We have also examined Thomas street for a proper place to make a hide market, and find the most convenient place for that purpose is the back of the Glibb-water, and that rails and other necessarys be placed along the butchers stalls in the city side, from the sign of the Butchers Arms as far as shall be found necessary for hanging the hides, the care of the said hide markets to be committed to the charge of some proper persons; and, to defray the expence in making the said Markets, and imploying men to attend them, that butchers and all owners of hides do pay one halfpenny per hide for lodging and selling the same in the said Markets, to be paid for the use of the city to the treasurer :Ordered that the said committee be continued, and that a hide market be built on Ormonde key, as mentioned in the said report, and that the said committee see the said work done.

[14.] John OATES and Henry THOMAS, having formerly petitioned that there has been appointed a standing committee for fire, to reward the petitioners and others serviceable in extinguishing fires in this city, therefore prayed the said committee might be revived, Upon which a committee was appointed, who made the following report, videlicet :
‘We, the standing committee appointed to reward such persons as shall be serviceable in extinguishing fire, do find that there are several buckets lost and wanting, as also other necessary materials. We are of opinion that what old buckets there are be immediately repaired, and that fifty new buckets be forthwith made, four shovels and two pickaxes :’ Ordered, according to the said report, and that the materials therein mentioned be bought by the treasurer and the old buckets repaired, the expence thereof to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[15.] The report of the directors for the Ballast Office to the generaL assembly of the 19th of October, 1716:
That we have made some progress in pileing below Ringsend with an engine made here, and do intend to continue that work so long as the season will permit : ordered that the committee do proceed;
And we design to provide materials for pileing on the South Bull early the next spring; it being the opinion of several skilful men that we should go on with that part of the work first, in order, as well as we can, to preserve the ships that are most exposed to storms: ordered accordingly.
We find it difficult to be supplied with oak, which we hope to compass; the fir we can readily be supplied with, and at cheaper rates than the oak :’ Ordered that the committee do provide timber as they shall think proper, and proceed.
We are building a second float of about thirty tuns, the former not being sufficient for the office business, and are going on in laying kishes on the north side of the channel and backing them, in order to prevent the floods overflowing that way :’ Ordered to proceed.
‘In our last we reported that we had sent to Holland for an engine to drive down the piles with; and for a man skilled in piling, etc. ; in answer to which we have an account that the engine is shipped and daily expected here, and that a man so skilled is not willing to come alone without a second, and must have six pounds per month wages and eight shillings per week board wages, for himself; and five pounds per month wages and six shillings per week board wages for his second, as per (Roll xix m. 44) letter, which amounts to one hundred and sixty eight pounds eight shillings per year for them both :’
Respite this paragraph as to the sending for the men till next assembly.
We are of opinion that their demands are very high, and that one of them would be sufficient to direct our people here, and that next spring will be soon enough for his coming over, if we can get one to come: respite this also. ,

An abstract of the cash now in the office is hereunto annexed :
All which is humbly submitted to your honors :
Thomas BOLTON – Mathew PEARSON -Thomas CURTIS. – Edward SURDEVILLE – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William EMPSON -Thomas STRINGER – William ASTON – Henry GLEGG -19th October, 1716; ,
Ordered that alderman Porter and alderman Somerville be continued on the said committee as aldermen, and that the commons name four commoners :-James King, senior, William Maple, Perceval Hunt, Philip Cooley.

An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 19th of July, 1716, exclusive, to the 18th of October, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office. Dr.
To balance of accounts to the 9th July 1716, inclusive: £49 11s. 3 1/2 d.
To cash received from the 19th July 1716 to the 18th )ct0ber 1716, inclusive: £1457 11s. 8d.

Total : £1507 0s. 11 1/2 d.
Decuct: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Balance in the Office £22 2s. 5d.

Besides in Mssrs Burtons and Harrisons hands as per account: £1600 5s. 5d.

Total in Cash: £1622 2s. 5d.

Per Contra
By sundry disbursements on the office accounts, from 19th July 1716 exclusive to 18th October 1716 inclusive: £1094 14s. 11d.
Expended towards carrying on the city wall, as per account: £390 5s. 7 1/2 d.

Total: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Franchise. Admissions to franchise. m.47.

[12.] On the petition of Daniel COOKE, gentleman, setting forth that the piece of ground on the Blind Key, whereon are three old houses formerly leased by the city of Dublin to Richard PROUDFOOT, is now by mesne assignment come to the petitioner, which lease being near expired and the aforesaid houses being very much out of repair, and ruinous and old, that he is desirous to become tenant to the city for the same after the expiration of the present lease, and prays a lease of the premises, which petition was referred to a committee, who made the following report : Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly to us directed, we have viewed and surveyed the within preinises and do find that the same contain in front to the Blind Key seventy-two foot, fronting the river seventy-six foot, on the west end forty-eight foot, and on the east end forty-seven foot, and we are of opinion that the within petitioner have a lease of the said premises, he leaving out nine foot of the forty-eight in breadth backwards towards the key next the river Liffy, whenever he rebuilds the aforesaid premises, which will make the said key in all twenty-five foot broad, as may appear by the annexed survey, for the term of ninety and nine years, to commence from Michaelmas, 1722, being the expiration of the old lease, at the yearly rent of fifteen pounds four shillings, and capons to the Lord Mayor, the rent to be paid half-yearly, at every Easter and every Michaelmas, to the treasurer for the citys use, and paying ten shillings on perfection of the lease for the use of the Poor House.’
Ordered that the petitioner have a lease of the premises within mentioned, pursuant the committees report, with such clauses as Mr. Recorder shall advise. Leases to be perfected next assembly.

[13.] Certain of the commons, having petitioned and set forth that the committee appointed to inspect into the hide markets, and to find out a proper place for selling hides, have made the following report, and pray the same may be made an act of assembly, videlicet :
‘Pursuant to your honours order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inquire for convenient places for hide markets, are of opinion that where the potatoes are now frequently sold on the. Key near Ormonde Bridge will be a fit place for a hide market, and that it may be made in length and breadth so large as can conveniently, to be inclosed by a, wall of (Roll xix m 45.) seven foot high next the street, and the wall next the river to be raised to the same height; that the market be flagged and a conveniency made to carry off the water, the slip to be made up, and that posts and rails with tenter hooks may be placed within the yard, in such manner as will contain the hides of the markets; that a pump be fixed in the yard, and doors and gates be placed therein. We have also examined Thomas street for a proper place to make a hide market, and find the most convenient place for that purpose is the back of the Glibb-water, and that rails and other necessarys be placed along the butchers stalls in the city side, from the sign of the Butchers Arms as far as shall be found necessary for hanging the hides, the care of the said hide markets to be committed to the charge of some proper persons; and, to defray the expence in making the said Markets, and imploying men to attend them, that butchers and all owners of hides do pay one halfpenny per hide for lodging and selling the same in the said Markets, to be paid for the use of the city to the treasurer :Ordered that the said committee be continued, and that a hide market be built on Ormonde key, as mentioned in the said report, and that the said committee see the said work done.

[14.] John OATES and Henry THOMAS, having formerly petitioned that there has been appointed a standing committee for fire, to reward the petitioners and others serviceable in extinguishing fires in this city, therefore prayed the said committee might be revived, Upon which a committee was appointed, who made the following report, videlicet :
‘We, the standing committee appointed to reward such persons as shall be serviceable in extinguishing fire, do find that there are several buckets lost and wanting, as also other necessary materials. We are of opinion that what old buckets there are be immediately repaired, and that fifty new buckets be forthwith made, four shovels and two pickaxes :’ Ordered, according to the said report, and that the materials therein mentioned be bought by the treasurer and the old buckets repaired, the expence thereof to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[15.] The report of the directors for the Ballast Office to the generaL assembly of the 19th of October, 1716:
That we have made some progress in pileing below Ringsend with an engine made here, and do intend to continue that work so long as the season will permit : ordered that the committee do proceed;
And we design to provide materials for pileing on the South Bull early the next spring; it being the opinion of several skilful men that we should go on with that part of the work first, in order, as well as we can, to preserve the ships that are most exposed to storms: ordered accordingly.
We find it difficult to be supplied with oak, which we hope to compass; the fir we can readily be supplied with, and at cheaper rates than the oak :’ Ordered that the committee do provide timber as they shall think proper, and proceed.
We are building a second float of about thirty tuns, the former not being sufficient for the office business, and are going on in laying kishes on the north side of the channel and backing them, in order to prevent the floods overflowing that way :’ Ordered to proceed.
‘In our last we reported that we had sent to Holland for an engine to drive down the piles with; and for a man skilled in piling, etc. ; in answer to which we have an account that the engine is shipped and daily expected here, and that a man so skilled is not willing to come alone without a second, and must have six pounds per month wages and eight shillings per week board wages, for himself; and five pounds per month wages and six shillings per week board wages for his second, as per (Roll xix m. 44) letter, which amounts to one hundred and sixty eight pounds eight shillings per year for them both :’
Respite this paragraph as to the sending for the men till next assembly.
We are of opinion that their demands are very high, and that one of them would be sufficient to direct our people here, and that next spring will be soon enough for his coming over, if we can get one to come: respite this also. ,

An abstract of the cash now in the office is hereunto annexed :
All which is humbly submitted to your honors :
Thomas BOLTON – Mathew PEARSON -Thomas CURTIS. – Edward SURDEVILLE – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William EMPSON -Thomas STRINGER – William ASTON – Henry GLEGG -19th October, 1716; ,

Ordered that alderman Porter and alderman Somerville be continued on the said committee as aldermen, and that the commons name four commoners :-James King, senior, William Maple, Perceval Hunt, Philip Cooley.

An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 19th of July, 1716, exclusive, to the 18th of October, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office. Dr.
To balance of accounts to the 9th July 1716, inclusive: £49 11s. 3 1/2 d.
To cash received from the 19th July 1716 to the 18th )ct0ber 1716, inclusive: £1457 11s. 8d.

Total : £1507 0s. 11 1/2 d.
Decuct: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Balance in the Office £22 2s. 5d.

Besides in Mssrs Burtons and Harrisons hands as per account: £1600 5s. 5d.

Total in Cash: £1622 2s. 5d.

Per Contra
By sundry disbursements on the office accounts, from 19th July 1716 exclusive to 18th October 1716 inclusive: £1094 14s. 11d.
Expended towards carrying on the city wall, as per account: £390 5s. 7 1/2 d.

Total: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Franchise. Admissions to franchise. m.47.

(Roll xix. M. 50)
1716-17. January 18.- Fourth Friday after Christmas. 1716:

[1.] George WALTON, city Marshal, having petitioned and set forth that the committee to whom the plan and estimate for building a marshalsea on the Merchants Keay were referred, had made the following report, and praying to have the same confirmed and made an act of assembly: ‘ Pursuant to your honours order of last assembly to us directed, we, the within committee, are of opinion that the plan hereunto annexed be the plan or ground plot for the building of a marshalsea on the Merchants Keay ; that the work and buildings be carried on with all convenient speed, and that the said building, with all the materials that will be used therein, to be provided at the citys charge, and that Mr. Richard MILLS do oversee the said work to be ‘done accordingly :ordered that the said report be made an act of assembly, and that the work be carried on with all convenient speed. ,

[2.] Auditors of the city accounts for the last year: Lord Mayor and Sherriffs, Alderman STOYTE, Sir John ROGERSON, Aldermen QUIN, BURTON, BARKEY, Mathew PEARSON, QUAYLE, CURTIS, SURDEVILLE, and eighteen of the commons, to be named by the commons, or any nine of them, whereof the Lord Mayor and one of the Sherriffs to be always two, are appointed auditors of the city accounts for the last year :
[Eighteen of the commons :] Joseph KANE, William DOBSON, Humphry FRENCH, William ALDRICH, Thomas STANFORD, William MAPLE, Henry GLEGG, William ASTON, James SOMERVILLE, Richard WALSH, John REYSON, John WRIGHT, Robert JACKSON, Christopher INCH, Vincent KIDDER, Jeremiah PEPPYAT, Philip COOLEY, Edward DUDGEON.

[3] Alderman John PORTER and Mr. John TISDALL, late Sherriffs, are appointed masters of the city works for the ensuing year.

[4.] John THOMSON, gentleman, and attorney of his majesties court of kings bench, praying to be admitted a city attorney: granted during the citys pleasure.

[5.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that Captain COPE’S house in Dawson Street having been several times attempted in a most outragious manner by thieves with fire-arms, as, by examination given into the lords justices and council, who have been pleased to (Roll xix m. 50 b) declare they shall be ready ,to issue a proclamation with a pardon and such reward as this honorable board shall think fit to offer on that account, and praying that this assembly would take the same into consideration, that a violence so uncommon and impudent in this great city be not suffered to pass with but due regard, but that such reward may be offered as in all probability may discover the actors of this particular villainy, and prove a terror to all who shall be so audacious to attempt the like disturbances for the future: it is thereupon ordered that the Lord Mayor and Sherriffs do wait on the Government and acquaint them that the city will give twenty pounds reward to any person that shall discover the persons that attempted to rob captain Copes house [named] in the within petition, so that such persons be convict of the said fact, which twenty pounds is ordered to be paid by the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, to the discoverer, on conviction of the offenders, and the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

m.50 con’t

[6.] On the petition of Jeremiah PEPPAYAT, setting forth that the committee to whom the contents of his petition were referred have made the following report in relation to the settling of prices and rates on such work as he does for the use of the city, as he is city printer, and prays the same may be made an act of this assembly: ‘Pursuant to your hnours order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inspect into the contents of Mr. Peppyat, city stationer and printers petition, have viewed his account, which is hereunto annexed, and are of opinion that he be paid in full of the said account, thirty four pounds, four shillings and seven pence, sterling. We have also considered of the prices that he may reasonably charge for the future for such work as he shall do for the citys use, which are as follows :-

For every hundred assize of bread, being the number to be printed at one time £0 10s. 0d.
For every hundred proclamations for regulating pavements, being two sheets £1 5s.
For every hundred proclamations for regulating watches, being two sheets £1. 5s.
For every hundred proclamations for keeping the Sabbath, one sheet £0 12s. 6d.
For every hundred. proclamations relating to carrs, carts, etc., one sheet £0 12s. 6d
For every hundred proclamations relating to beggars, one sheet £0 12s. 6d.
For every hundred proclamations for May day, one sheet £0 12s. 6d.
For every hundred advertisements relating to scavengers, folio £0 4s. 0d
For every hundred advertisements relating to scavengers, quarto £0 2s. 0d
For every thousand pipe water receipts £0 15s. 0d
For every hundred orders of committee for pipe water £0 6s. 3d.
For every hundred presentments of grand jury £0 12s. 6d
For every hundred warrants on ditto. £0 6s. 3d
Where there are but 50 proclamations printed and one sheet to be allowed
for each proclamation. £0 0s. 2d.

(Roll xix m. 50b) It is thereupon ordered that the report be confirmed, and that the treasurer do pay to the petitioner the money that is in the within report mentioned, the same to be allowed him in his accounts.”

[7.] On the petition of Samuel JOHN, setting forth that he is the only surviving son of Mr. Isaac JOHN, late of the city of Dublin, goldsmith, who had the honour to serve in the office of one of the Sherriffs of this city who by will bequeathed twenty pounds to the Blue boys Hospital; that by misfortunes of his own and others he has been for a long time in confinement for debt till lately released by the act for the relief of insolvent debtors, and therefore prays the citys charity: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the within petitioner six pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[8.] On the petition of Joseph HARPER, setting forth that he has attended this honorable city in the place and imployment of Conn MATHEWS, ever since his misfortune, and therefore prays the citys consideration for such his services: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the above petitioner ten pounds, sterling, to be allowed the same on account.

[9.] Certain of the Commons, praying to enlarge the assembly: ordered that the assembly be enlarged till nine o’clock.

[10.] On the petition of Elizabeth TAYLOR, widow, praying to be admitted one of the city widows in the room of her mother, Catherine COSGRAVE, deceased: ordered that the petitioner be admitted one of the city poor widows at the usual allowance during the citys pleasure.

[11] Jacob PEPPARD, esquire, town clerk, setting forth that he pays one hundred pound per annum for the Tholsell office, and since July, 1703, hath paid eight hundred and fifty pounds rent of said office, which sum, with the abatement of one hundred and fifty pounds, the city was pleased to allow the petitioner for his trouble and loss on two former acts of parliament for discharging insolvent debtors without fees, and with the like allowance of one hundred and fifty pounds, sterling, for the time the said office was shut up by reason of the late distractions in the city, clears all the rents payable out of the said office to the city, excepting two years ending January instant; that in order wholly to apply himself to the business of this city he quitted his other offices and business, and for his zeal in the citys service during the late unhappy contest he underwent many personal indignities and great disquiet of mind, having many severe orders sent him by those men in power to terrifie the petitioner from his faithful discharge of his duty to the city; that the petitioner, during the year and a halfes unhappy dispute in the city was deprived of all gain and profit by his said office, and for so long lost his usual subsistence and has had no allowance or consideration from this honourable city for himself and two clerks, who during the said dispute were constantly imployed and paid an uncommon attendance on that occasion: that the petitioner has lately discharged many prisoners on the last act of grace without fee or reward, which lessens much the profits of the said office, and therefore prayed that his case may be taken into consideration, and such abatement and allowance made as the honorable assembly shall think fit: it is thereupon.ordered that the within petitioner be remitted the two years rent due by him to the city for the Tholsell office, and that he apply no more for himselfe or his clerks.

[12.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 18th of January, 1716[17] :

That we have continued pileing below Ringsend as long as the seas would permit, and have finished some. small part of what was designed to be piled, and hope in time it may answer the ends proposed by it : ordered to proceed.

That we intend next spring:, if your honours think fit, to go on with the pileing on the South Bull, according to our last report; have some oak timber by us towards carrying on the said work, fit for the second, third and fourth row of the said piles, but shall want for the first row, which must be oak, and a longer length than what we already have :’ ordered to proceed.
The second float, mentioned in our last to be then building, is now finished and at work
We have carried the kishes as far westward on the north side of the river as we designed them, and likewise as high at that end, being three rows, and have filled them with stones, and are now backing them, and do design to continue laying kishes to the same height eastward on the said river side :’ ordered to proceed.
The engine from Holland, mentioned in our last, we have received and tried, and do find it much more chargeable in working than was expected, neither is it capable of driving piles of a length sufficient for Cock lake and the said South Bull; but there is one Wilks, a smith, who proposes to make an engine which he says will drive the longest pile which the office will have occasion to drive, with half the number of hands which the Dutch engine requires and with more expedition, of which they have made a model which has been seen by my Lord Mayor and others ,and several of them do approve of it; but the price demanded for it being fifty pounds, sterling, we would not order the building or making of it without your honours approbation thereof and directions therein: ordered that the engine be made as the committee shall direct.

‘We having seen the working of the engine from Holland, and being pretty well acquainted with the engine that is offered to be made, we are of opinion that our workmen here are capable of driving the piles Dub without assistance from Holland.

‘We have neither kishes nor hurdles by us to go on with the said works, so that the charge of furnishing them and the long timber for the said piles, the great quantity of stones, both for the said piles and filling the said kishes, together with backing them, and the other great expences of the said office the next summer, will far surmount the produce of the same, and the most part of the fund of cash which we had beforehand being already laid out, as may appear by the office accounts and abstract of the office cash, we fear we shall not be able for want of cash to go on with the said work next summer unless the city will please to assist us, which we hope they will do, and that the rather because the said office has, by their directions and for their use expended on the city wan on the north side of Lazy Hill £693 16s. 1d., sterling, of the said office cash, as may appear by vouchers and certificates:’ ordered to go on with the work as money comes in.

‘We do humbly conceive that if the cash book of the Ballast Office was closed at the making the report to be delivered to the assembly, it would be much easier from time to time to examine the said cash book than it is at present, which is closed every quarter, ending the lst May, August, November and February, yearly: ‘ ordered that this be referred to the committee.

‘An abstract of the cash now in the office is here unto annexed :

All which is humbly submitted to this honorable assembly: Mathew PEARSON – Thomas CURTIS – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William EMPSON – Peter VERDON – Philip COOLEY – William ASTON – William MAPLE – Thomas STRINGER – Percivall HUNT – Henry GLEGG -James KING’

Roll xix, m. 48
An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 18th October, 1716 inclusive to the 17th January 1716(17) exclusive.
Ballast Office Dr.
To balance of account to 18th October, 1716 inclusive: £22. 2s. 5d.
To cash received from ships etc., from the 18th October, 1716 exclusive to 17th January, 1716[17], inclusive: £535 2s. 1d.
To cash received from Messrs Burton & Harrison : £900 0s. 0d.
Total: £1457 4s. 6d.
Deduct: £1445 0s. 6 1/2 d.
Balances in the Office £12.3s. 11 1/2 d

Besides in Messrs Burton & Harrisons hands: £700 0s 0d

Total in cash: £712 3s. 11 1/2 d

Due to Sundry Persons from the Office: £212 6s. 10 1/2 d

Remains: £499 17s. 1 1/2d.

Per Contra Cr.
By cash paid sundry disbursements from 18th October 1716, exclusive to 17th January 1716 (17) inclusive: £1103 18s. 7 1/2 d
By cas disbursed for the city, from 18th October 1716 exclusive to 17th January 1716 (17) inclusive: £341 1s. 11 d.

Total: £1,445 0s. 6 1/2 d