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Dublin Under The Georges, 1714-1830

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Dublin Under the Georges
1714-1830
Constantina Maxwell

CHAPTER IV
Life of the Poor

The city of Quang-tcheu [Dublin] … is much celebrated amongst the Quang-tongese for its size and magnificence, and is supposed to contain 400,000 souls, but this cannot be; for, in that case, 200,000 of them must, of necessity, be hurdled [sic] together in extreme filth and misery, which, in such a polished and charitable age and nation, it is absurd to suppose.
JOHN WILSON CROKER, “An Intercepted Letter from J. T., Esq., Writer at Canton, to his Friend in Dublin, Ireland (1804) (a satire on Dublin society, published anonymously)

Great exertions have been made, and are daily making, by humane societies and individuals, for relieving the Poor.
SAMUEL ROSBOROUGH, “Observations on the State of the Poor of the Metropolis (Dublin, 1801)

The Rev. Thomas Campbell, an Irish clergyman who was acquainted with London, while praising the elegance of the fashionable parts of Dublin, remarked in his Philosophical Survey of the South of Ireland, published in 1777, that “the bulk” of the city was “like the worst parts of St. Giles”. “I must say,” wrote Mrs. Delany earlier in the century, “the environs of Dublin are delightful, [but] the town is bad enough – narrow streets and dirty-looking houses.” And practically every other eighteenth-century visitor refers to the filth and squalor of the Dublin poor. “Poverty, disease, and wretchedness exist in every great town,” wrote Curwen, an Englishman who made a tour of Ireland shortly after the Union, “but in Dublin the misery is indescribable.” .

The population of Dublin was variously estimated during the eighteenth century. Sir William Petty put it at 58,045 in 1682. Dr. Rutty, the Quaker physician who wrote “A Natural History of County Dublin”, estimated it in 1772 at 128,570, while the ‘Post-chaise Companion’, published towards the end of the century, gives the figure as 300,000, which represented the popular view. In 1798 the Rev. James Whitelaw,(1) the charitable Rector of St. Catherine’s Church in Thomas Street, determined to investigate the matter and to carry out a census of his own. With the sanction of the Government he took a number of assistants, and together they carried out a house-to-house search. This was not an easy task, for it occupied them ten hours a day during five successive months, and took them into the lowest and dirtiest quarters of the city. “My assistants and I,” wrote Whitelaw, “undeterred by the dread of infectious diseases, undismayed by degrees of filth, stench, and darkness inconceivable by those who have not experienced them, explored, in the burning months of the summer of 1798, every room of these wretched habitations from the cellar to the garret, and an the spat ascertained their population” He put the total population of Dublin at 172,091, but considered that another 10,279 persons should be added if the soldiers in the garrison, the staff of the Castle, the inmates of various institutions, and the students of Trinity College were included. The return under the Population Act of 1814 was 175,319 which shows that Whitelaw was not very far out; it also shows that Dublin had at the time of the Union a greater population than any of the towns in England, London of course excepted. (2)

Petty had shown that the inhabitants of Dublin were “more crowded and straitened in
their housing than those of London,” and by the end of the century-judging from the
account given by Whitelaw – the congestion seems to have grown worse. This was
especially true of the districts known as the Liberties, most of which lay to the south
-west of the, river – in the oldest part of the city.

Whitelaw writes:
‘The streets [in this part of the City] are generally narrow; the houses crowded
together; the rears or back-yards of very small extent, and some without accommodation
of any kind. Of these streets, a few are the residence of the upper class of shopkeepers
or others engaged in trade; but a far greater proportion of them, with their numerous
lanes and alleys, are occupied by working manufacturers, by petty shop-keepers, the
labouring poor, and beggars, crowded together to a degree distressing to humanity. A
single apartment in one of these truly wretched habitations, rates from one to two
shillings per week, and to lighten this rent two, three, or even four families become
joint tenants. As I was usually out at very early hours on the survey I have frequently
surprised from ten to sixteen persons, of all ages and sexes, in a room not 15 feet
square, stretched on a wad of filthy straw, swarm¬ing with vermin, and without any
covering, save the wretched rags that constituted their wearing apparel. Under such
circumstances it is not extraordinary that I should have frequently found from 30 to 40
individuals in a house. An intelligent clergyman of the Church of Rome assured me that
number 6 Braithwaite Street some years since con¬tained 108 souls. These however in 1797
were reduced to 97; and at the period of this survey to 56. From a careful survey twice
taken of Plunket Street, it appeared that 32 contiguous houses contained 917 souls,
which gives an aver¬age of 287 to a house, and the entire Liberty averages from about 12
to 16 persons to each house ….

“This crowded population [Whitelaw goes on to say] wherever it obtains is almost
universally accompanied by a very serious evil – a degree of filth and stench
inconceivable except by such as have visited these scenes of wretchedness. Into the
backyard of each house, frequently not 10 feet deep, is flung from the windows of each
apartment, the ordure and other filth of its numerous inhabitants; from which it is so
seldom removed, that I have seen it nearly on a level with the windows of the first
floor; and the moisture that, after heavy rains, oozes from this heap, having frequently
no sewer to carry it off, runs into the street, by the entry leading to the staircase.
One instance out of a thousand that might be given, will be sufficient. When I attempted
in the summer of 1798 to take the population of a ruinous house in Joseph’s Lane near
Castle market, I was interrupted in my progress by an inundation of putrid blood, alive
with maggots, which had from an adjacent slaughter yard burst the back door, and filled
the hall to the depth of several inches. By the help of a plank and some stepping stones
which I procured for the purpose (for the inhabitants without any concern waded through
it) I reached the staircase. It had rained violently, and from the shattered state of
the roof a torrent of water made its way through every floor, from the garret to the
ground. The sallow looks and filth of the wretches who crowded round me indicated their
situation, though they seemed insensible to the stench, which I could scarce sustain for
a few minutes. In the garret I found the entire family of a poor working shoemaker,
seven in number, lying in a fever, without a human being to administer to their wants.
On observing that his apartment had not a door, he informed me that his landlord,
finding him not able to pay the week’s rent in consequence of his sickness, had the
preceding Saturday taken it away, in order to force him to abandon the apartment. I
counted in this style 37 persons; and com¬puted, that its humane proprietor received out
of an absolute ruin which should be taken down by the magistrate as a public nuisance, a
profit rent of above £30 per annum, which he extracted every Saturday night with
unfeeling severity. I will not disgust the reader with any further detail, and only
observe that I generally found poor room-keepers of this description, notwithstanding so
many apparent causes of wretchedness, apparently at ease, and perfectly assimilated to
their habitations. Filth and stench seemed congenial to their nature; they never made
the smallest effort to remove them; and if they could answer the calls of hunger, they
felt, or seemed to feel, nothing else as an in¬convenience ….

“In July 1798 the entire side of a house 4 storeys high, in School-House Lane, fell from
its foundation into an adjoin¬ing yard, where it destroyed an entire dairy of cows. I
ascended the remaining ruin, through the usual approach of shattered stairs, stench and
filth. The floors had all sunk on the side now unsupported, forming so many inclined
planes; and I observed with astonishment, that the inhabitants, above 30 in number, who
had escaped destruction by the circumstance of the wall falling outwards, had not
deserted their apartments. I was informed, that it had remained some months in this
situation, and that the humane landlord claimed, and actually received for it, the usual
rent …. The most dense population, as might naturally be expected, is found within the
walls of the ancient city, comprehending the parishes of St. Werburgh, St. John, St.
Michael, St. Nicholas Within, the eastern part of St. Audoen, and the Deanery of Christ
Church. This space, containing an area of nearly 45 acres English, had in 1798, 15,683
inhabitants in 1,179 houses; which gives an average of 349 souls nearly to an acre, or
13.3 to a house. There were at that period 137 houses waste. The density of population
however varies within this space; for St. Nicholas Within has only 215.5 to an acre, or
10.5 to a house; while in St. Michael’s it amounts to 439 to an acre, and almost 16 to a
house.”

To be continued

(1) The Rev. James Whitelaw, statistician and philanthropist, was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in 1771. His most important service was his census of the City of Dublin, carried out 1798-1805. His most important work was his History of Dublin, in which he collaborated with John Warburton, Keeper of the Records in Dublin Castle. Neither lived to see the publication of this work, which was completed by Robert Walsh, at that time Curate of Finglas, Co. Dublin. Whitelaw founded several charitable institutions, the most useful of which was the Meath Charitable Loan (1808) for the benefit of unemployed members of the Coombe. He died of a malignant fever contracted from visiting his poor parishioners in 1813.

(2) The population of London, calculated from the parish registers of baptisms, was 674,350 in 1700 and 676,250 in 1750. According to the census returns of 1801 and 1811 it was 900,000 and 1,050,000 respectively. See M. D. George, London Life in the Eighteenth Century, pp. 329-30.

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Presbyterian Exodus, Co. Longford, 1729

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Thomas J. Barron.

Published in Breifne.

As far back as 1675, when South Ulster had not even one Presbyterian Congregation in either Fermanagh, Monaghan, or Cavan, there was a minister, Rev. ??? Jacques in charge of the Corboy church. Rev. John Mairs of Loughbrickland was ‘transplanted’ to Longford in 1697, where he complained about his work and the extent of his charge, ‘being at least ten miles over, and the two places in his charge (Corboy and Tully or Clongish) for preaching in each other Sabbath, being five miles distant’ He desired to return to Ulster, but his synod did not give him permission till 1706, when it released him ‘from his intolerable grievances, his wife losing her health, his own craziness (ill-health) and the greatness of his charge.’ He was succeeded by Rev. William Hare, who was ordained in Corboy in 1708, and resigned in 1720. The next, minister was Rev. James Bond who was ordained in 1722.

It was during Mr Bond’s ministry in, Corboy that an exodus from the district was organised by a Col. Charles Clinton, a copy of whose diary of the journey across the Atlantic to America is preserved in the New York State Library. I am much indebted to Mr Victor Murphy, a member of the Corboy Church, for the loan of this very interesting document.

First we must find the reasons why there was such great unrest amongst the Presbyterians in Ireland at this time which forced thousands of them to flee from the country in spite of the great hardships encountered in crossing the Atlantic and settling in untamed and undeveloped country. In the later part of 1728 Primate Boulter transmitted to the secretary of state in: England the following ‘melancholy account’ as he called it, of the state of the North and of the extensive emigration which was taking place to America:
“We have had for several years some agents from the colonies in America, and several masters of ships, that have gone about the country and deluded the people with stories of great plenty and estates to be had for going for, in those parts of the world; and they have been the better able to seduce people by reason of the necessities of the poor of late, The people that go from hence make great complaints of the oppressions they suffer here, not from the government, but from their fellow subjects of one kind or another, as well as the dearness of provisions, and say these oppressions are one reason for their going. But whatever occasions their going, it is certain that 4,200 men women, and children have been shipped off from hence to the West Indies within three years; and of these about 3,100 this last summer. The whole North is in a ferment at present and people every day engaging one another to go next year to the West Indies. The humour has spread like contageous distemper and the people, will hardly hear anyone that will cure them of their madness. The worst is that it affects only Protestants and reigns chiefly in the North, which is the seat of our linen manufacture.”

The Dublin authorities alarmed by the extensive emigration from Ulster consulted Presbyterian ministers on the subject. The answer of one of the presbyteries has been preserved. They specify the discouragements under which they lay, by the Sacramental Test excluding them from all places of public trust and honour as among the chief causes of driving them to other parts of the of the empire where no such discouragements existed. But they also state that :the bad seasons for three years past, together with the high price of lands and tithes, have all contributed to the general run to America, and to the ruin of many families, who are leaving their houses and lands desolate.

This, then, is the background of the tragic story contained in the diary of Colonel Charles Clinton, who led the exodus from County Longford. The company included a Mr Cruise, evidently the owner of the ship, who was accompanied by at least eight un-named ‘servants’ who died on the journey. These ‘servants’ were men who had contracted with the master of the ship for four years’ servitude and release after their arrival in America. As a native Irishman, Cruise would have been glad to encourage and facilitate the settlers in their exit from his country.

From Primate Boulter’s statement to the secretary of state in England we learn that there were in March 1729, seven ships at Belfast carrying off about 1,000 passengers to America; which enables us to arrive at about an average of 150 passengers to each ship. According to Clinton’s diary 83 passengers died during the 23 weeks’ journey; so at least half of the pilgrims going to a freer life than what they had known in Ireland, perished at sea. Strange to say little clue is given as to the cause of the deaths, except that it is stated that Clinton’s daughter, Katherine, and his son James were the first to become ill with measles on2 June; Katherine dying on 2 August, and, James on 28 August.

T. Witherow in his Memorials of Presbyterianism has an interesting note on the origin of the Delap family in Ireland, four of whom perished in the ill-fated enterprise. Hugh Delap appears to have been the first of the family who settled in Ireland, He married a Miss Aikin, and after his marriage he left Scotland, made his way across the Channel and set up business in ,the town of Sligo. In due time when he had a home fit for her reception, his wife, who is described as a woman of very small stature, followed him to Ireland, but in making her way over the Donegal mountains was robbed in passing through the Gap of Barnesmor. The Delaps were amongst the first Protestants who settled in Sligo; For years their children remained unbaptized, there being no Protestant minister in the place; but at last one named Roecroft arrived, by whom the rite, was administered. Two days before the Irish rebellion of 1641 LordTaffe sent for the family and brought them to Ballymote – an event which, in all probability, was the means of preserving their lives. Hugh Delap left a son Robert, who lived as a merchant successively in Sligo, Manorhamilton and Ballyshannon. Doubtless Tom Delap, mentioned in the diary, was another descendant of the dauntless little Scotswoman, who about a hundred years previously, had ventured through the wilds of Donegal to find her man in Sligo, What-ever Tories or Rapparees relieved her of her property must have had sufficient respect for her to leave her her life. This fact is all the more remarkable when we remember that these Irish, were living in an area hitherto unpopulated, until the Scottish settlers in East Donegal drove them into the mountains.

The Bonds: Rev James Bond’s ministry was the longest in the history of the congregation, viz. 39 years. He was grandfather of Captain Willoughby Bond of Faragh, County Longford, who was an elder in the church. Captain Bond was one of the largest landed, proprietors in the county. He was a generous contributor to the support of Corboy, as well as other Presbyterian churches.

After the Revolution (1689), the landed proprietors, anxious to induce persons to occupy their waste lands, granted very favourable leases, under which the Presbyterian tenantry had been stimulated to improve their holdings ,and to extend their cultivation, But as these leases, usually for thirty-one years, expired, the gentry raised their rents to such an amount that farmers were exceedingly discouraged, and began to thinkof relinquishing their farms, and of either returning to Scotland or emigrating to America. The rise of their rents brought along with it also a still more galling discouragement. It was almost always invariably accompanied by a proportionate increase of the tithe, which was felt to be more burdensome than the rent, being paid to a clergy from whom they derived no spiritual benefit, and who were often bitterly opposed to their civil and religious liberties. In 1718 a minister in Ulster wrote to a friend in Scotland that no less that six ministers had left their congregations and gone off to the American plantations taking great numbers of their people along with them…………In 1729, the year the Longford people set off, the Irish were coming to Philadelphia in such large numbers as to alarm the Quaker and English inhabitants, for, in a statement to the Council in that year the Deputy Governor of the Province said:
“It looks as if Ireland is to send all its inhabitants hither, for last week, no less that six ships arrived, and every day two or three arrive also. The common fear is that if they continue to come they will make themselves masters of the province.”

It-should also be noted that not the least of Presbyterian grievances was that marriages’ performed by a Presbyterian minister were not marriages by law nor were they valid till 1782.

DIARY OF COL. CHARLES CLINTON DURING HIS PASSAGE FROM IRELAND TO AMERICA, MAY 9th-OCTOBER 4th, 1729.
A Journal of my voyage and travels from the county of Longford in the Kingdom of Ireland to Pensilvania in America – Anno Dom’ 1729.

I took my journey from the County of Longford on Friday The 9th,day of may, Came to Dublin ye 12th Ditto. Enter’d on Ship Board The Ship Call’d The George and Ann ye 18th Sett Sail the 20th.

Came to Anchor at Glanarm on The 24th where matt’w mcClaughry and his wife and 2 of his family went on Shoar and quit Their voyage. Sett Sail from Glanarm on ye 25th and Came to Apchor at Green Castle in the Lough of oern (seems to have been Lough Foyle ed’s note) The 26th where we Stay’d till ye 29th then Sett Sail in Company with The John of Dublin, bound for new castle’ (New Castle in Delaware, in 1728 4,500 persons most of whom came from Ireland landed cf. Maginniss The Irish Contributon to America’s Independence)in The Same Country.

Ditto Came in Sight of Loughsuly (Lough Swilly) ye 30th Sail’d by Torry & hornhead on the 30th at night a Strong winde arose it Continued to ye first of June at Evening which Loosened our bowsprint with Hazard of our masts.

June,ye 2d ‘we had a fair breese on our westerly Course. on the 3d ditto my Daughter Katt’n and son James fell Sick of the measels.

A strong Gale of westerly wind Continues to ye l0th ditto.

James Willan’s Child Died ye 5th on the 7th met ye Mary from pensilvania from w’e she sailed to us in 5 weeks and 5 days. On The 8th ditto a Child of James mc Dowel’s died and was thrown over board.

(Editor’s Note: The Mary from Pensylvania, it seems, had crossed the Atlantic in 5 weeks and 5 days or roughly six weeks, According to the diary the George and Ann Were off the Swilly on 30 May and sighted America on 4 October, giving us exactly 23 weeks for the passage from east to west; in other words because of adverse winds the passage from east to west could take almost four times as long as the passage from west to east, in the days of the sailing ships. )

on the Tenth ye winde Came to East and be South.
on ye 11th Changed more Easterly and Continues fair and seasonable
on the12th the wind Blew north & be East, a fresh Gale by which we sail’d 40 Leagues in 20 hours and found we were in 49° 20’ north Latitude by observation the wind Changed on ye 13th do to ye South and so Continues to ye 15th being Sunday morning one of ye Serv’ts a board belonging to one Gerald Cruise threw himself over Deck & was drown’d
on ye 15th my Daughter Katt’n fell sick of ye measels a Serv’t of mr Cruise’s Dyed on ye 17th and was Thrown over Deck the wind Came to w b s & Continues a violent fresh Gale to ye 18th. the 19th and 20th we had a South & be west wind. on the 21st being Sunday ‘we had a perfect Calm in La,tt 27° 30’

a Serv’t of mr Cruise’s Died on monday a Child of James Thompson’s Died on Tuesday ye 23 a Child of John Brooks Died we had a fair wind on ye 22d 23d then another Child of Jam’s Thompson’s died. on The 28th a Child of James majore Died and one of Robt. Frazer’s

We now have w:n:w: wind Tuesday ye 1st of July a fair wind. July ye 3d a Child of John Brooks Died. a Child or Daughter of Will mcCutchan’s Died Do a Child of John Brooks Died. July ye 5th came in Sight of the Island of Curvo and flores (Ed’s note – must have been the Azores) which belongs to the portegees they Lye in the Latt’d of 40° : 09 north and 32 : 23 west Longitude

a Child of James mcDowels Died July ye 7th.
Ditto Robt Todd Died.
Mr. Ephram Covell
Quintin Crimbell
Robert Brown-merch’t
will Caldwell
a Brother of will hamilton’s
Will Gray
my own Daughter on 2 of agust at night.
a child of James majore’s
a Daughter of widow hamilton ,
James majore’s wife
Thorn Delap’s wife
Alex’d mitchel
a Child of James Thompson’s
Walter Davis his wife
widdow Hamilton
Robt Gray
a Child of widow Hamilton
Walter Davis
Jane Armstrong
A Child of Jam majore’s
an other servant of Cruise’s
william Gordon
Isabel mc cutchan
my son James on ye 28th of agust: 1729 at 7 in ye morning
a Son of James majore’s
a brother of And’w mc Dowell’s
a Daughter of Walter Davis’s
Robert frazer
Patt mc Came Serv’t to Tho: Armstrong

Will Hamilton
James Greer ser’t to Alex. Mitchell
Widdow Gordon’s daughter
James Morray died Thursday 11th 7br (September)
A serv’t of Mr. Cruise’s
A Son of John Beatty’s
Two of Mr Cruise’s men Ser’ts
James Thompson’s wife
James Brown
A Daughter of James Mc Dowell’s
A Daughter of Thom. Delap’s
A Serv’t of Mr. Cruise’s
John Oliver’s wife
James majores Eldest Daughter
John Crook a Sailor
Jos. Stafford
John mc Dowell’s sister
James Wilson’s wife
Sarah Hamilton will Ham’ns Sister
Thomas Armstrong died Monday ye 29th of 7br (September)
John Beatty’s wife
Isabella Johnston
Edw’d Morris
Marg’t mc Claughry
Widow Frazer’s Daughter
And’w mc Dowell’s Brother
Jos mc Claughry
A young Sister of And’w McDowell’s
Tom Delap – and his daughter Katherine
James Barkly
Discovered Land on ye Continent of America ye 4th day of 8br 1729 (8th October 1729)

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Will Abstracts, Lismore and Waterford, 1724-88

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Pre 1858 abstracts can be helpful even for those whose ancestors did not make wills – here we have domestic servants mentioned, there are placenames which may or may not be phonetic variations on those we find in the 1851 Townland Directory.

19 June 1724
Everard, George
Will of George Everard of Garrondillon Co. Tippy (Tipperary)- his wife Ellen, eldest son Edmond two thirds, John second youngest son one third of the property. To Dr. James Glysane, par. Priest, a young black filly & £4.6.8. To Mr. Wm. McCarthy one of executors, a young bay meare. Mr. Hamilton Lowe ffetheard, Mr. Wm. Mcarthy Clocully & wife Ellen Everard, Executors. Present: Laur Fanning, Nich White. Bond of £200 ster: due from Mr. Redmond Everard Bart of some other person for his use.

NOTE: John Bray: Burgess of Clonmel, Conf. Kilkenny & M.P. Clonmel in St. James II parliament, lived at Garondillon in 1677: he had forfeited under Cromwell & by deed of 26 Mar 1669 was demised 478 acres in Knockballymallow/Knockballynemollogh for term of 31 years, by Thomas Juxon

26 Nov 1729
Goss, Gration:
Will of Gration Goss, Citty of Waterford – all to his wife Catherine Goss. £5 to her Grandchild Thos. Comby, declared by Gration Goss in presents of Alexr Desmaison, Pirce Butler, James Walsh – after or in my life – my ffrince book to Alexr Desmaison in ye same order as at p.: sent, with the silver clasps on ye salme along wth them.

12 Feb 1725
Clancy, Johannes:
Admon of goods of Johannes Clancy intestate of Kildarmudy firmarius, granted to Marg. Clancy his Widow by Thomas bishop of Waterford & Lismore.

16 July 1725
Quarry, Isaac:
Will of Isaac Quarry, Knockane – his farm and cattle &c to be divided between his two sons John & William – joint Executors, to old servt Mary Ryane, house garden & grassing for four collops during lease of Knockane, rent free & to her two children my daughter by her £5 each at 19 years of age. To my good friend Wm. Gombon during my lease a house rent free for life and grassing for one beast & when he dies to daughter Esther. Prest Pierce Power, Robt Quarry Will Gambon.

14 Feb 1729:
Redmunds, Timotheus
Admon of goods to Timotheus Redmunds granted to Alicia Redmunds, Clonmel, Widow

5 Aug 1725
Wells, Simon
Will of Simon Wells schoolmaster – All to his wife Sarah Wels (execux) & daurs. Amy, Elizabeth & Lydia. Prest. John Fell, Thos. Murray, John Sault

27 Jan 1726;
Ellis, John
Will of John Ellis, gent: Leaves a Moydore to each Edwd Redmonds , Benj. Robinson, Wm. Blackcoat (son of John Blackcoat), his silver watch to John Norrinton, sword to Michl. Browne & rest, bonds debts to Susanna Browne. Prest. John Smith David Walls, Willm Lonergan.

Meade, Garrett. Dungarvan, Mercht.
2nd May 1787. Probate to Frances Lonergan 23rd Aug 1787
Partnership of Lonergan & Meade.: – Accts. & Bequest of £200 on Geo. Porter – conditioning Wm. Lonergan son of Francis Lonergan to have stores & cellars & £25. £25 to Revd. John Buckley for purpose I have mentioned him & further sum of £25 for said purpose. Gold watch to Wm. Lonergan, £39 to Mr. Thos. Fade. Residue to wife mrs. Elizabeth Lonergan for sole use & c. She and Frances Lonergan sole Execrs. G. Lonergan, James Kennedy.
Codicil to last: £5 to James Williamson for mourning. 40 guineas to Barthol. Guinan, Cork. 30 gns to Michl. Anthony, Jr. Tanner. £10 to Mrs. Marg. Connery, Dungarvan. Residue only; any effects to my brother Henry Meade not yet remitted should produce amount. William Walsh, Mary Power.

Robinson, John. Waterford City. Gent.
18th Nov. 1786. Probate to Robt. Backas 23rd Aug. 1787
Rbt. Backas, son of Alderman Geo. Backas & Elenor his wife, the dwelling house and garden in rere of Peirce’s Lane orwise Kisby’s Lane, city Waterford, which Mr. Kelly now holds under me with the Turrett and garden outside (inside) same to be held & enjoyed by said Robt. Backas and heirs. I also leave him my House in Barronstrand St now in possession of Mr. David Henry,(Heneary) also houses held by lease to Mr. John Archbold, Mercht. Near the new bridge. Robt. Backas sole Exr. & Rec. Legatee. Present: R. Dillon, Sylvester Pyne, Tho. Anthony.

Baldwin, John. Gent. Cahir.
9th Feb 1786. Probate 15th Oct. 1787.
5s each to sons & Daurs. Edward, Margt.McGrath (Als. Baldwin), Allice Mahony (Als. Baldwin), Thomas, James, John, bridget, Ellen. All the rest to wife Bridget Baldwin als. O’Brien. Prest. Jeffery Keating, Pierce Everard.

Bohen, Matthew. City of Waterford, Baker.
14th May 1787. probate 25th Jan 1788
Wife Margt. & Six sons. Bakery, houses to wife & Revd. D. Thomas Hearn. Exors. Andw. Dobbyn; Thos. Hunt and Thomas Cooke.
Codicil June 1787: Bequeaths Revd. Thomas Hearn £5.

Foster, Francis. Coolroe.
29th Feb 1788. 12th Mar. 1788 Probate.
Sister Ann Rogers als. Foster £50. Cath Moore als. Foster £20, Sister Elizabeth Cottanger £10, nephew Chris. Moore my bal or best bay horse. To nephew Wm. Moore my other bay horse. To friend and bror in law Pierce Rogers my watch. Rest to two sisters Sarah Gill and An Rogers. Trustee Revd. Anth. Sterling, sole exor. Prest. Will Cheeran, Jno, Edwd. Bourne.
Probate granted to Revd. A. Sterling.

Walsh, Richard. Mariner. Waterford City.
5th Jan 1788. Probate 23rd June 1788. Probate 23rd June 1788
Appoints wife Margt. Sole heiress Execx. & Adminx. Bequeath her all real and pers. Pres. Jas. Foristall, Ellen Hynes.
Probate granted to Margt. Widow.

Whelan, John, Waterford.
21st June 1784. Probate 16th July 1788
To be buried in St. Patrick’s. To each sisters children, John martin and Richd. Tobin, to John Neale’s son, Wm. Neale, silver ink horn with a gold and silver pen.- watch to keep in memory of me. £5 to repairs of Johnstown Chapple. Exors. Wm Neal, Joan Tobin als Morrisey, and Murphy.
Codicil to last:21st June 1784:
If Wm. Neale and Joan Tobin not living at death bequeath Mr. Henry O’Neile, bror of Mrs. O’Neile, Exors. £10 for trouble.

Osborne, Sir Thomas,
Tickincor, Co. Waterford, Knt.
13 Oct 1713. Precis ½ p., 17 Sept 1717

Wife Dame Ann Osborne als. Usher. Son Nicholas. Grandson John Osborne.
Edward Hubbart, lessee of Winsland als. Farrinbullin near White Church Rock. Edmond Power, lesee of the lands in B. Glannehiry, William Rony, Widow Gough, Widow Bull, Susanna Cox, John Fling, Joseph Thomas, William Hore of Caraine. Widow Ronane, Wm. Fies, Thomas Morrisy, Morrish Houllighane and Gerald Gibon, tenants in parish of Dungarvan.
Cullenagh, Coolepeasoone (?Coolnabeasoon), Knockmeale, Barneshangannagh in B. of Glannehiry; Cooleporsilly, Parknecorry, Clyneskie, Parkeirsheal, Clynegonniny and Garrystroppie, Parish of Dungarvan, Barony of Decies; Winsland als Farrinbullin, all in Co. Waterford
Witnesses: William Browning, Affane, Co. Waterford, Esq; James Usher, Ballintaylor, Co. Waterford, Esq.,; and Robert Carew, Tickinure, Co. Waterford, gent.
Memorial Witnessed By: Peter Molloy, Dublin gent; Cha. Browne
Ann Osborne (Seal)

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Presbyterian Exodus, Co. Sligo, 1729

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As far back as 1675, when South Ulster had not even one Presbyterian Congregation in either Fermanagh, Monaghan, or Cavan, there was a minister, Rev. ??? Jacques in charge of the Corboy church. Rev. John Mairs of Loughbrickland was \’transplanted\’ to Longford in 1697, where he complained about his work and the extent of his charge, \’being at least ten miles over, and the two places in his charge (Corboy and Tully or Clongish) for preaching in each other Sabbath, being five miles distant\’ He desired to return to Ulster, but his synod did not give him permission till 1706, when it released him \’from his intolerable grievances, his wife losing her health, his own craziness (ill-health) and the greatness of his charge.\’ He was succeeded by Rev. William Hare, who was ordained in Corboy in 1708, and resigned in 1720. The next, minister was Rev. James Bond who was ordained in 1722.

It was during Mr Bond\’s ministry in, Corboy that an exodus from the district was organised by a Col. Charles Clinton, a copy of whose diary of the journey across the Atlantic to America is preserved in the New York State Library. I am much indebted to Mr Victor Murphy, a member of the Corboy Church, for the loan of this very interesting document.

First we must find the reasons why there was such great unrest amongst the Presbyterians in Ireland at this time which forced thousands of them to flee from the country in spite of the great hardships encountered in crossing the Atlantic and settling in untamed and undeveloped country. In the later part of 1728 Primate Boulter transmitted to the secretary of state in: England the following \’melancholy account\’ as he called it, of the state of the North and of the extensive emigration which was taking place to America:
\”\”We have had for several years some agents from the colonies in America, and several masters of ships, that have gone about the country and deluded the people with stories of great plenty and estates to be had for going for, in those parts of the world; and they have been the better able to seduce people by reason of the necessities of the poor of late, The people that go from hence make great complaints of the oppressions they suffer here, not from the government, but from their fellow subjects of one kind or another, as well as the dearness of provisions, and say these oppressions are one reason for their going. But whatever occasions their going, it is certain that 4,200 men women, and children have been shipped off from hence to the West Indies within three years; and of these about 3,100 this last summer. The whole North is in a ferment at present and people every day engaging one another to go next year to the West Indies. The humour has spread like contageous distemper and the people, will hardly hear anyone that will cure them of their madness. The worst is that it affects only Protestants and reigns chiefly in the North, which is the seat of our linen manufacture.\”\”

The Dublin authorities alarmed by the extensive emigration from Ulster consulted Presbyterian ministers on the subject. The answer of one of the presbyteries has been preserved. They specify the discouragements under which they lay, by the Sacramental Test excluding them from all places of public trust and honour as among the chief causes of driving them to other parts of the of the empire where no such discouragements existed. But they also state that :the bad seasons for three years past, together with the high price of lands and tithes, have all contributed to the general run to America, and to the ruin of many families, who are leaving their houses and lands desolate.

This, then, is the background of the tragic story contained in the diary of Colonel Charles Clinton, who led the exodus from County Longford. The company included a Mr Cruise, evidently the owner of the ship, who was accompanied by at least eight un-named \’servants\’ who died on the journey. These \’servants\’ were men who had contracted with the master of the ship for four years\’ servitude and release after their arrival in America. As a native Irishman, Cruise would have been glad to encourage and facilitate the settlers in their exit from his country.

From Primate Boulter\’s statement to the secretary of state in England we learn that there were in March 1729, seven ships at Belfast carrying off about 1,000 passengers to America; which enables us to arrive at about an average of 150 passengers to each ship. According to Clinton\’s diary 83 passengers died during the 23 weeks\’ journey; so at least half of the pilgrims going to a freer life than what they had known in Ireland, perished at sea. Strange to say little clue is given as to the cause of the deaths, except that it is stated that Clinton\’s daughter, Katherine, and his son James were the first to become ill with measles on2 June; Katherine dying on 2 August, and, James on 28 August.

T. Witherow in his Memorials of Presbyterianism has an interesting note on the origin of the Delap family in Ireland, four of whom perished in the ill-fated enterprise. Hugh Delap appears to have been the first of the family who settled in Ireland, He married a Miss Aikin, and after his marriage he left Scotland, made his way across the Channel and set up business in ,the town of Sligo. In due time when he had a home fit for her reception, his wife, who is described as a woman of very small stature, followed him to Ireland, but in making her way over the Donegal mountains was robbed in passing through the Gap of Barnesmor. The Delaps were amongst the first Protestants who settled in Sligo; For years their children remained unbaptized, there being no Protestant minister in the place; but at last one named Roecroft arrived, by whom the rite, was administered. Two days before the Irish rebellion of 1641 LordTaffe sent for the family and brought them to Ballymote – an event which, in all probability, was the means of preserving their lives. Hugh Delap left a son Robert, who lived as a merchant successively in Sligo, Manorhamilton and Ballyshannon. Doubtless Tom Delap, mentioned in the diary, was another descendant of the dauntless little Scotswoman, who about a hundred years previously, had ventured through the wilds of Donegal to find her man in Sligo, What-ever Tories or Rapparees relieved her of her property must have had sufficient respect for her to leave her her life. This fact is all the more remarkable when we remember that these Irish, were living in an area hitherto unpopulated, until the Scottish settlers in East Donegal drove them into the mountains.

The Bonds: Rev James Bond\’s ministry was the longest in the history of the congregation, viz. 39 years. He was grandfather of Captain Willoughby Bond of Faragh, County Longford, who was an elder in the church. Captain Bond was one of the largest landed, proprietors in the county. He was a generous contributor to the support of Corboy, as well as other Presbyterian churches.

After the Revolution (1689), the landed proprietors, anxious to induce persons to occupy their waste lands, granted very favourable leases, under which the Presbyterian tenantry had been stimulated to improve their holdings ,and to extend their cultivation, But as these leases, usually for thirty-one years, expired, the gentry raised their rents to such an amount that farmers were exceedingly discouraged, and began to thinkof relinquishing their farms, and of either returning to Scotland or emigrating to America. The rise of their rents brought along with it also a still more galling discouragement. It was almost always invariably accompanied by a proportionate increase of the tithe, which was felt to be more burdensome than the rent, being paid to a clergy from whom they derived no spiritual benefit, and who were often bitterly opposed to their civil and religious liberties. In 1718 a minister in Ulster wrote to a friend in Scotland that no less that six ministers had left their congregations and gone off to the American plantations taking great numbers of their people along with them…………In 1729, the year the Longford people set off, the Irish were coming to Philadelphia in such large numbers as to alarm the Quaker and English inhabitants, for, in a statement to the Council in that year the Deputy Governor of the Province said:
\”\”It looks as if Ireland is to send all its inhabitants hither, for last week, no less that six ships arrived, and every day two or three arrive also. The common fear is that if they continue to come they will make themselves masters of the province.\”\”

It-should also be noted that not the least of Presbyterian grievances was that marriages\’ performed by a Presbyterian minister were not marriages by law nor were they valid till 1782.

DIARY OF COL. CHARLES CLINTON DURING HIS PASSAGE FROM IRELAND TO AMERICA, MAY 9th-OCTOBER 4th, 1729.
A Journal of my voyage and travels from the county of Longford in the Kingdom of Ireland to Pensilvania in America – Anno Dom\’ 1729.

I took my journey from the County of Longford on Friday The 9th,day of may, Came to Dublin ye 12th Ditto. Enter\’d on Ship Board The Ship Call\’d The George and Ann ye 18th Sett Sail the 20th.

Came to Anchor at Glanarm on The 24th where matt\’w mcClaughry and his wife and 2 of his family went on Shoar and quit Their voyage. Sett Sail from Glanarm on ye 25th and Came to Apchor at Green Castle in the Lough of oern (seems to have been Lough Foyle ed\’s note) The 26th where we Stay\’d till ye 29th then Sett Sail in Company with The John of Dublin, bound for new castle\’ (New Castle in Delaware, in 1728 4,500 persons most of whom came from Ireland landed cf. Maginniss The Irish Contributon to America\’s Independence)in The Same Country.

Ditto Came in Sight of Loughsuly (Lough Swilly) ye 30th Sail\’d by Torry & hornhead on the 30th at night a Strong winde arose it Continued to ye first of June at Evening which Loosened our bowsprint with Hazard of our masts.

June,ye 2d \’we had a fair breese on our westerly Course. on the 3d ditto my Daughter Katt\’n and son James fell Sick of the measels.

A strong Gale of westerly wind Continues to ye l0th ditto.

James Willan\’s Child Died ye 5th on the 7th met ye Mary from pensilvania from w\’e she sailed to us in 5 weeks and 5 days. On The 8th ditto a Child of James mc Dowel\’s died and was thrown over board.

(Editor\’s Note: The Mary from Pensylvania, it seems, had crossed the Atlantic in 5 weeks and 5 days or roughly six weeks, According to the diary the George and Ann Were off the Swilly on 30 May and sighted America on 4 October, giving us exactly 23 weeks for the passage from east to west; in other words because of adverse winds the passage from east to west could take almost four times as long as the passage from west to east, in the days of the sailing ships. )

on the Tenth ye winde Came to East and be South.
on ye 11th Changed more Easterly and Continues fair and seasonable
on the12th the wind Blew north & be East, a fresh Gale by which we sail\’d 40 Leagues in 20 hours and found we were in 49° 20\’ north Latitude by observation the wind Changed on ye 13th do to ye South and so Continues to ye 15th being Sunday morning one of ye Serv\’ts a board belonging to one Gerald Cruise threw himself over Deck & was drown\’d
on ye 15th my Daughter Katt\’n fell sick of ye measels a Serv\’t of mr Cruise\’s Dyed on ye 17th and was Thrown over Deck the wind Came to w b s & Continues a violent fresh Gale to ye 18th. the 19th and 20th we had a South & be west wind. on the 21st being Sunday \’we had a perfect Calm in La,tt 27° 30\’

a Serv\’t of mr Cruise\’s Died on monday a Child of James Thompson\’s Died on Tuesday ye 23 a Child of John Brooks Died we had a fair wind on ye 22d 23d then another Child of Jam\’s Thompson\’s died. on The 28th a Child of James majore Died and one of Robt. Frazer\’s

We now have w:n:w: wind Tuesday ye 1st of July a fair wind. July ye 3d a Child of John Brooks Died. a Child or Daughter of Will mcCutchan\’s Died Do a Child of John Brooks Died. July ye 5th came in Sight of the Island of Curvo and flores (Ed\’s note – must have been the Azores) which belongs to the portegees they Lye in the Latt\’d of 40° : 09 north and 32 : 23 west Longitude

a Child of James mcDowels Died July ye 7th.
Ditto Robt Todd Died.
Mr. Ephram Covell
Quintin Crimbell
Robert Brown-merch\’t
will Caldwell
a Brother of will hamilton\’s
Will Gray
my own Daughter on 2 of agust at night.
a child of James majore\’s
a Daughter of widow hamilton ,
James majore\’s wife
Thorn Delap\’s wife
Alex\’d mitchel
a Child of James Thompson\’s
Walter Davis his wife
widdow Hamilton
Robt Gray
a Child of widow Hamilton
Walter Davis
Jane Armstrong
A Child of Jam majore\’s
an other servant of Cruise\’s
william Gordon
Isabel mc cutchan
my son James on ye 28th of agust: 1729 at 7 in ye morning
a Son of James majore\’s
a brother of And\’w mc Dowell\’s
a Daughter of Walter Davis\’s
Robert frazer
Patt mc Came Serv\’t to Tho: Armstrong

Will Hamilton
James Greer ser\’t to Alex. Mitchell
Widdow Gordon\’s daughter
James Morray died Thursday 11th 7br (September)
A serv\’t of Mr. Cruise\’s
A Son of John Beatty\’s
Two of Mr Cruise\’s men Ser\’ts
James Thompson\’s wife
James Brown
A Daughter of James Mc Dowell\’s
A Daughter of Thom. Delap\’s
A Serv\’t of Mr. Cruise\’s
John Oliver\’s wife
James majores Eldest Daughter
John Crook a Sailor
Jos. Stafford
John mc Dowell\’s sister
James Wilson\’s wife
Sarah Hamilton will Ham\’ns Sister
Thomas Armstrong died Monday ye 29th of 7br (September)
John Beatty\’s wife
Isabella Johnston
Edw\’d Morris
Marg\’t mc Claughry
Widow Frazer\’s Daughter
And\’w mc Dowell\’s Brother
Jos mc Claughry
A young Sister of And\’w McDowell\’s
Tom Delap – and his daughter Katherine
James Barkly
Discovered Land on ye Continent of America ye 4th day of 8br 1729 (8th October 1729)

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