Tag Archives: 1790s

Marriage index. Ardcath (Clonaliz, Clonashalvey), Meath. 1797-98

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Ardcath (Clonaliz, Clonashalvey), Meath

  Ardcath, (Clonaliz, Clonashalvey), Marriage Index 1797-1798

This is an index of the names of the people who were married in the Roman Catholic parish of Ardcath (Clonaliz, Clonashalvey) during the years 1797-1798  The following table of marriages is transcribed from Microfilm No. 4180 held online by the National Library of Ireland accessible through their Roman Catholic Parish Register Search page.   All names and surnames given here are as I read them.

My list is sorted by the surname of the groom.  Question marks indicate letters or words I had a problem reading.  The letters ‘sic’ indicate that is how I read the letters I have typed.
[ ] indicates that the letters within the brackets are my best guess at what the letters might be.

Townlands are not given.

Nicknames, Shortened names used in Irish records

If you go to the page i have linked to below and are sitting at a PC and want to search the records for a surname that you are interested in then press Ctrl and F together.  A box will pop up for you to enter the characters you’d like to find on the page you are on. Pressing enter will bring you to the next entry for that name and so on.  My thanks to Clare Lawler Kilgallen who posted this information on a Facebook page.

If you are working with a Mac then press ⌘ & F and continue as above.

Page 2 Marriage Records Ardcath (Clonaliz, Clonashalvey) Roman Catholic Parish : Transcription begins on this page of microfilm.

 

NameSurnameBride NameBride SurnameDateYear
Jo?n??PierceAnnCampbell03-Dec1798
JamesAndrewsCathrineTonson16-May1798
ChristopherBallMaryHowart24-Nov1798
PeterBrennanNancyMulreed05-Sep1798
JamesCainRoseByrne28-Nov1798
MathewCarrolCathrineSheridan29-Dec1798
PatrickCormickMaryGaurgan13-Dec1798
WilliamDonniganRoseDunn15-Feb1798
RichardDowlanAllyMagrane12-Sep1797
AndrewDowlanMaryWalsh28-Jan1798
JamesDuffCathrineWalsh11-Sep1797
PatrickEverettMaryEnnis18-Feb1798
ThomasFlinnBridgetMagin20-Aug1797
JamesFloodyMaryWalsh20-Sep1797
ThosGarganMaryDonnelly10-Jan1798
ThomasGuiganCathrine??Thoshel06-Dec1798
PeterGuilshenanFannyCarr28-Oct1798
JohnHalliganBridgetWalsh21-Jun1797
BartleKellyNancyBrennan03-Oct1797
ChristopherMagraneJeneDuff?1 Mar1798
MathewMagrathMaryDuff12-Oct1797
JohnMagreaneAnn?Chi[r]ine18-Jun1797
JamesMaguireMaryHardford24-May1798
WilliamMathewsMaryBryne29-Aug1797
NicholasMc[K]ennnaBridgetMcLaughlin15-Mar1798
EdwdOneilBridgetCrosby02-Jan1798
WilliamPlunketElizabethConnel06-May1798
ThomasRogersBettyHacket23-Apr1798
RichardSmythAliceTeernan08-Feb1798
ChristopherWalshMargaretFelmer07-Jul1797
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Dublin Under The Georges, 1714-1830

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Dublin Under the Georges
1714-1830
Constantina Maxwell

CHAPTER IV
Life of the Poor

The city of Quang-tcheu [Dublin] … is much celebrated amongst the Quang-tongese for its size and magnificence, and is supposed to contain 400,000 souls, but this cannot be; for, in that case, 200,000 of them must, of necessity, be hurdled [sic] together in extreme filth and misery, which, in such a polished and charitable age and nation, it is absurd to suppose.
JOHN WILSON CROKER, “An Intercepted Letter from J. T., Esq., Writer at Canton, to his Friend in Dublin, Ireland (1804) (a satire on Dublin society, published anonymously)

Great exertions have been made, and are daily making, by humane societies and individuals, for relieving the Poor.
SAMUEL ROSBOROUGH, “Observations on the State of the Poor of the Metropolis (Dublin, 1801)

The Rev. Thomas Campbell, an Irish clergyman who was acquainted with London, while praising the elegance of the fashionable parts of Dublin, remarked in his Philosophical Survey of the South of Ireland, published in 1777, that “the bulk” of the city was “like the worst parts of St. Giles”. “I must say,” wrote Mrs. Delany earlier in the century, “the environs of Dublin are delightful, [but] the town is bad enough – narrow streets and dirty-looking houses.” And practically every other eighteenth-century visitor refers to the filth and squalor of the Dublin poor. “Poverty, disease, and wretchedness exist in every great town,” wrote Curwen, an Englishman who made a tour of Ireland shortly after the Union, “but in Dublin the misery is indescribable.” .

The population of Dublin was variously estimated during the eighteenth century. Sir William Petty put it at 58,045 in 1682. Dr. Rutty, the Quaker physician who wrote “A Natural History of County Dublin”, estimated it in 1772 at 128,570, while the ‘Post-chaise Companion’, published towards the end of the century, gives the figure as 300,000, which represented the popular view. In 1798 the Rev. James Whitelaw,(1) the charitable Rector of St. Catherine’s Church in Thomas Street, determined to investigate the matter and to carry out a census of his own. With the sanction of the Government he took a number of assistants, and together they carried out a house-to-house search. This was not an easy task, for it occupied them ten hours a day during five successive months, and took them into the lowest and dirtiest quarters of the city. “My assistants and I,” wrote Whitelaw, “undeterred by the dread of infectious diseases, undismayed by degrees of filth, stench, and darkness inconceivable by those who have not experienced them, explored, in the burning months of the summer of 1798, every room of these wretched habitations from the cellar to the garret, and an the spat ascertained their population” He put the total population of Dublin at 172,091, but considered that another 10,279 persons should be added if the soldiers in the garrison, the staff of the Castle, the inmates of various institutions, and the students of Trinity College were included. The return under the Population Act of 1814 was 175,319 which shows that Whitelaw was not very far out; it also shows that Dublin had at the time of the Union a greater population than any of the towns in England, London of course excepted. (2)

Petty had shown that the inhabitants of Dublin were “more crowded and straitened in
their housing than those of London,” and by the end of the century-judging from the
account given by Whitelaw – the congestion seems to have grown worse. This was
especially true of the districts known as the Liberties, most of which lay to the south
-west of the, river – in the oldest part of the city.

Whitelaw writes:
‘The streets [in this part of the City] are generally narrow; the houses crowded
together; the rears or back-yards of very small extent, and some without accommodation
of any kind. Of these streets, a few are the residence of the upper class of shopkeepers
or others engaged in trade; but a far greater proportion of them, with their numerous
lanes and alleys, are occupied by working manufacturers, by petty shop-keepers, the
labouring poor, and beggars, crowded together to a degree distressing to humanity. A
single apartment in one of these truly wretched habitations, rates from one to two
shillings per week, and to lighten this rent two, three, or even four families become
joint tenants. As I was usually out at very early hours on the survey I have frequently
surprised from ten to sixteen persons, of all ages and sexes, in a room not 15 feet
square, stretched on a wad of filthy straw, swarm¬ing with vermin, and without any
covering, save the wretched rags that constituted their wearing apparel. Under such
circumstances it is not extraordinary that I should have frequently found from 30 to 40
individuals in a house. An intelligent clergyman of the Church of Rome assured me that
number 6 Braithwaite Street some years since con¬tained 108 souls. These however in 1797
were reduced to 97; and at the period of this survey to 56. From a careful survey twice
taken of Plunket Street, it appeared that 32 contiguous houses contained 917 souls,
which gives an aver¬age of 287 to a house, and the entire Liberty averages from about 12
to 16 persons to each house ….

“This crowded population [Whitelaw goes on to say] wherever it obtains is almost
universally accompanied by a very serious evil – a degree of filth and stench
inconceivable except by such as have visited these scenes of wretchedness. Into the
backyard of each house, frequently not 10 feet deep, is flung from the windows of each
apartment, the ordure and other filth of its numerous inhabitants; from which it is so
seldom removed, that I have seen it nearly on a level with the windows of the first
floor; and the moisture that, after heavy rains, oozes from this heap, having frequently
no sewer to carry it off, runs into the street, by the entry leading to the staircase.
One instance out of a thousand that might be given, will be sufficient. When I attempted
in the summer of 1798 to take the population of a ruinous house in Joseph’s Lane near
Castle market, I was interrupted in my progress by an inundation of putrid blood, alive
with maggots, which had from an adjacent slaughter yard burst the back door, and filled
the hall to the depth of several inches. By the help of a plank and some stepping stones
which I procured for the purpose (for the inhabitants without any concern waded through
it) I reached the staircase. It had rained violently, and from the shattered state of
the roof a torrent of water made its way through every floor, from the garret to the
ground. The sallow looks and filth of the wretches who crowded round me indicated their
situation, though they seemed insensible to the stench, which I could scarce sustain for
a few minutes. In the garret I found the entire family of a poor working shoemaker,
seven in number, lying in a fever, without a human being to administer to their wants.
On observing that his apartment had not a door, he informed me that his landlord,
finding him not able to pay the week’s rent in consequence of his sickness, had the
preceding Saturday taken it away, in order to force him to abandon the apartment. I
counted in this style 37 persons; and com¬puted, that its humane proprietor received out
of an absolute ruin which should be taken down by the magistrate as a public nuisance, a
profit rent of above £30 per annum, which he extracted every Saturday night with
unfeeling severity. I will not disgust the reader with any further detail, and only
observe that I generally found poor room-keepers of this description, notwithstanding so
many apparent causes of wretchedness, apparently at ease, and perfectly assimilated to
their habitations. Filth and stench seemed congenial to their nature; they never made
the smallest effort to remove them; and if they could answer the calls of hunger, they
felt, or seemed to feel, nothing else as an in¬convenience ….

“In July 1798 the entire side of a house 4 storeys high, in School-House Lane, fell from
its foundation into an adjoin¬ing yard, where it destroyed an entire dairy of cows. I
ascended the remaining ruin, through the usual approach of shattered stairs, stench and
filth. The floors had all sunk on the side now unsupported, forming so many inclined
planes; and I observed with astonishment, that the inhabitants, above 30 in number, who
had escaped destruction by the circumstance of the wall falling outwards, had not
deserted their apartments. I was informed, that it had remained some months in this
situation, and that the humane landlord claimed, and actually received for it, the usual
rent …. The most dense population, as might naturally be expected, is found within the
walls of the ancient city, comprehending the parishes of St. Werburgh, St. John, St.
Michael, St. Nicholas Within, the eastern part of St. Audoen, and the Deanery of Christ
Church. This space, containing an area of nearly 45 acres English, had in 1798, 15,683
inhabitants in 1,179 houses; which gives an average of 349 souls nearly to an acre, or
13.3 to a house. There were at that period 137 houses waste. The density of population
however varies within this space; for St. Nicholas Within has only 215.5 to an acre, or
10.5 to a house; while in St. Michael’s it amounts to 439 to an acre, and almost 16 to a
house.”

To be continued

(1) The Rev. James Whitelaw, statistician and philanthropist, was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated in 1771. His most important service was his census of the City of Dublin, carried out 1798-1805. His most important work was his History of Dublin, in which he collaborated with John Warburton, Keeper of the Records in Dublin Castle. Neither lived to see the publication of this work, which was completed by Robert Walsh, at that time Curate of Finglas, Co. Dublin. Whitelaw founded several charitable institutions, the most useful of which was the Meath Charitable Loan (1808) for the benefit of unemployed members of the Coombe. He died of a malignant fever contracted from visiting his poor parishioners in 1813.

(2) The population of London, calculated from the parish registers of baptisms, was 674,350 in 1700 and 676,250 in 1750. According to the census returns of 1801 and 1811 it was 900,000 and 1,050,000 respectively. See M. D. George, London Life in the Eighteenth Century, pp. 329-30.

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Marriage Records, Carrigeen and Mooncoin, Co. Kilkenny, 1799

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Notes on with some extracts from the section of this register which covers marriages 1799. Marriage register is titled “Carrigeen and Mooncoin”. People are listed as being from Polrone and other parishes. All that could be read easily for Jan & Feb 1799 transcribed completely.

Note – first few marriages are listed that the people are both of the parish of Polrone – why??

Jan 16th Thos. Walsh & Mary Carroll – Poulroan parish
Michael Carroll & Elizabeth Walsh

Jan 25th Richd Doherty & Margaret Kenedy.Polrone Parish
Edmd Macky & Maurice Phelan & Willm Carroll

Jan 27th
Michael Dullard & anstas Dunphy of Polron parish
Martin Dunphy, Edmd Dullard & Walt Grant

Jan 27th
Jas Feore of Aglis Catherine Henebry of Ballybrazill
Edmd Feore, Nicholas Henbry & Willm Broders

Feb 3rd.
Patrick Hickey of Cloga to Margaret Grant of Cur?boddy
Kyran Brennan, William McDonnell & Patrick Knox

Feb 5th
Jas. Howley to Mary Begley – Polrone parish
Willm Dunne, Philip Carroll & Ell?a Commerford

Feb 5th
David Keefe to Jean Walsh both of ?Glin
Robbin Walsh, Walt Walsh & James Conway

Feb 9th Michael ??ibs of ?Dowr?mone to Catherine Cuddihy of Donebrone?
Jno Quin, Edmd Stone & Edmd Grant

Feb 11th
Martin ?Nonane of Monchoine to Anne Browne of Ardry.
Thomas Dunphy, Edmond Heign & John Connors

Feb 12th
Jno Phelan of Ballincurry to Catherine Power of Polrone
Rihd Hayes, Jas Morahan, & Richd Phelan

Feb 15th
Jas. Divine, parish of Ownen to Joan Walsh of Silversprings
Michl Cullanan, Thos Walsh, Ann Tobin

Feb 15th
Edmd Walsh, Portnascully to joan Henebry of Ballybrasil
Nicholas Henebry, Danl Walsh & Margaret Macky

Feb 16th
Jno Broders and Anstas Walsh of Doonane
Jno >Dedy, Thos Henebry & Richd Feore

Feb 17th
Edmond McDonel Eleanor Walsh both of Doonane
Richard Walsh, Richard Feore & Anstace Walsh

Feb 18th Patrick Balden of Mothel parish to Elizabeth Brennan of Rath?Crub.
Edmd Fielding, Jno Duggan, Walt Walsh

Feb 18th
Richd Hogan & Mary Fribs both of Grange
Robert Fribs ??? Hogan & Patrick Duigan

Feb 12th, 1792
Married : Thos. Reddy of Kilmacow parish by a certificate from Revd. Mr. Gorman) to Catharine Maguire of Rathkyran present: Mathew Reddy, David Lyons and Thos. Maguire

May 1799
Rathkyran: May 7th. Married, John Reed to Joan Cudihy. Both of this parish and related in the 3rd degree of consanguinity
Wit: Thomas Reed & Margt Reed & Cathy Knox

Ballala?siria. Septr 12th. Married Thomas Ready to Margt Cudihy
Both of this parish
Witnesses: Richd Reed & Cathy Walsh

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Baptism and Marriage Extracts, Church of Ireland, Carlow Town, 1747-1855

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A few baptismal and marriage extracts from the Church of Ireland parish registers of Carlow town, Co. Carlow.
Spellings are exactly as I read them with no changes. Question marks show where I had difficulty reading a word or a name

Carlow Church of Ireland Parish Register Extracts
Baptisms : 1836-1852
Marriages : 1836-1845
Burials : 1836-1865
R.C.B. Library Ref.: P. 317.1.3

BAPTISMS:
Baptised : Nov. 11th, 1838.
Born : Oct. 12th, 1838
Name : Henry
Parents : Wm. & Elizabeth Black?burne
Abode: Carlow
Profession/Occupation father: ?Saddler

Baptised : July 31st, 1842.
Born : July 10th, 1842
Name : James Edward
Parents : James & Dorcas Porter
Abode: Carlow
Profession/Occupation father: Physician
Curate: William Brandon

Baptised : Dec 27th, 1843
Born : Sept 27th, 1843
Name : Edward Albert
Parents : Thos. James & Jane Margaret Rawson
Abode: Carlow
Profession/Occupation father: Surgeon & M.D.
Rector: J. Jameson

Baptised : July 11th, 1846.
Born : Not given
Name : Robert Nicholas
Parents : Thomas & Jane Rawson
Abode: Carlow
Profession/Occupation father: Doctor
Wm. Brandon – Private baptism, child (?very) ill

MARRIAGES:
Groom: Mansergh Lugworth Flood of Carlow Parish
Bride : Anne Catherine Moore of Carlow Parish
By Banns. 2nd May 1837
Signed : Lugworth Flood & Catherine Moore
Witnesses: Jane Emerson & Patrick Devereux

BURIALS:
# 379. John Blackburne, Carlow. Aug 22nd, 1855. 2 years. Thos. Shelland Curate.
#461. Un-named Blackburne. Carlow. 28th Jan 1860. No age given
Baptisms 1852-1864
P. 317.2.1
No Blackburne, Flood or Rawson listed.

Carlow Church of Ireland Parish Register Extracts
R.C.B. Library Ref.: P. 317.1.2

1747
Month?? 31st Baptised. Joseph son of John and Ann Bowles. Killeshin

1748
Aug 27th Married. Robert Carr and Ann Bowles, being called in Church July the 31st, Aug 7th & 14th

1756
Oct. 17th Married: Will’m Bowles to Mary Harborne. Rich’d Mills

1757
July 24th Baptised : James Bowles son to Will’m & Mary Bowles

1764
July 9th Married: Jno Bowles to Eliz. McGrath with Lycence

1772
April 12th Marr’d: Joseph Bowels and Ann Tunstead with Lycence

1774
June 20th Bapt’d : Robt. Son to Wm. And Sarah Bowles

1775
Mary 21st Bapt’d: Jane Daughter to Jno and Mary Bowls (sic)

1808
Feb 27th Married / By Mr. D. / Joseph Bowles to Jane Feltus, both of this parish, by Licence
1810
May. Omitted, about 7th. Bapt : Eliza Daughter of Joseph and Jane Bowles

1811
June 16th. Marr’d: James Bale and Mary Budds
Sept 9th. Bapt’d: John son of Joseph and Elizabeth Bowles

1812
Jan 26th Bapt’d: Margt. Daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Bowles
Aug 31st. Mar’d: John Graham and Lucinda Bowles

p. 122
1821
May 17th Bapt’d: Eliza. Daughter of Joseph and (Blank) Bowles.

Next page of register (p. 123) = blank note re 10 pages on – did not go ten pages to see if it continued at that point

Page 124 – 1822
Page 125 – 1825
Page 127 – 1824

No mention of Bowles or Feltus surnames on these pages.

1825
Dec 12th. Married by ?C. Francis Flood of the parish of Carrick, Co. Kilkenny to Dorcas Burchaell of (??this parish)

 

 

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Admiralty Passing Certificates, Co. Cork, 1782-92

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Records of admiralty passing certificates for people of County Cork between the years of 1782 and 1792.

Surname Name Townland Year Note
Broderick John 1789 Bantry
Conor Richard Daniel 1790 Cork
Denstan Thomas 1782 Cork
Dundas Thomas Lawrence 1788 Middleton
Earle Edward Charles 1792 Cork
Elmore Henry Mathias 1782 Cork
Fair Robert 1763 Cork
Falkener Charles Leslie Samuel, Esq 1789 St. Paul’s
Fitzgerald henry John 1789 St. Paul’s
Hungerford John George 1788 Cloughnokiley
Johnston William Benjamin William 1786 Upper Shannon
Morgan Robert 1771 Christ Church
Nason Henry John of Kinsale 1790 Clifton
Nason Richard Henry 1786 Castlelyons
O’Hea Matthew James 1786 Clonmel Cove
Otway Robert Robert 1788 St. Mary, Shandon,
Reid henry James 1792 Middleton
Rumley James William, Esq 1788 Ahada
Sarsfield Domnick Michael 1790 St. Mary & St. Ann, Shandon
Smith George Charles Thomas 1790 Cork
Trant Philip Henry 1786 St. Paul’s, Cork
Walsh Stephen Russell Richard Esq. 1792 Christ Church
Warren Robert Thomas William 1792 Carrigaline
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Irish Marriages, Portapatrick, Wigtownshire, Scotland

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This page features free transcribed records relating to Irish people to emigrated to and married in Portapatrick, Wigtownshire, Scotland in the late 1700s and early 1800s.

1763 July 3rd Wilkinson William, a gent from Cachorelly ,Co. Limerick married mrs. Jacoba Susanna Bowchier from Killcullane, Co. Limerick

1764 March 25th Holmes Cornelious from Shennagh, Co. Cork married Miss Margret Wilkison from Calreleigh, Co. Limerick

1780 Jan 19th Cox Richard, Sir, Bart from Dunmanway, Co. Cork married Miss Mary O’Bryan from Limerick now residing Portapatrick

1784 May 17th Fitzgibbon Thomas, Esq Co. Limerick married Miss Mary Fitzgibbon from Ballyseeda, Liberties of Limerick City Witnesses: Quin, Elizabeth & Quinn, William

1784 June 3rd Vincent Thomas, Esq from Limerick City married Miss Mary Ann Cowney from Limerick City

1785 Feb 1st Fitton Terence, Esq from Cork City married Miss Lucinda Browne Lucinda, from Rathcahill, Co. Limerick

1786 Jan 22nd Royce Nicholas Ford, Esq from Nantinan, Co. Limerick married Miss Mary Catherine Croker from Rawleighstown, Co. Limerick

1786 May 12th Grady Standish, Esq Grange, Co. Limerick married Mrs. Margaret Foord from Limerick City widow of Abraham Foord, Esq. late of City of Limerick Witness: Grady, William jun

1786 Oct 9th Fitzgerald John, Esq. from Rathkeal, Co. Limerick married Elizabeth Dartnell from Rathkeal, Co. Limerick she the 3rd dau of Edward Dartnell. Witness: Dartnell, Edward

1788 Nov 8th Goggin Michael, Esq from City of Limerick married Miss Eliza Harrison from Limerick City

1791 Dec 29th Massy George, Hon. from Stagdale Lodge, ?Co. Limerick (he was from Co. Limerick) married Miss Elizabeth Scanlan from Balynaha, Co. Limerick Witness: Scanlan, Michael jun

1792 March 12th Massy Hugh,Rt. Hon. Lord, Baron from Co. Limerick married Miss Margaret Everine Barton from The Grove, Co. Tipperary Witnesses: Barton, Thomas & Barton, Charles & Cody, Judith

1793 Sept 19th Hunt Edmund, Esq. from Inchirourke, Co. Limerick married Miss Teresa Butler from ss Millbrooke, Co. Clare dau of James Butler Esq.

1794 May 13th Forbes Frederic, The Hon. from Co. Longford ; Lieut of 80th & 5th regt of foot married Mary Butler from Limerick City Spinster

1794 June 21st Whyte Charles, Esq. Lieut. 80th & 5th Regt of Foot married Anna Ross Lewin from Fortfergus, Co. Clare spinster Witnesses: Collis, henry: Limerick City & Williams, Joseph, servant to C. Whyte & Fyfe, Andrew: from Portpatrick

1795 Aug 28th Horan Ringrose Drew Esq. from Co. Limerick married Miss Jane Buchanan from King’s Co/Offaly Witness: Murray, Alexander: Commander Hillsborough Packet

1797 April 27th Hunt Thomas Edward, Esq Captain in His majesty’s 64th Regt of Foot married Miss Mary Mahony from Limerick City dau of Pierce Mahony, Esq Witrnesses: Mainsell, Jno & Mack, James & Mahony, Pierce & Fyfe, Andrew – Portpatrick

1797 Dec 4th Blennerhassett Arthur, Esq from Elmgrove near Tralee, Co. Kerry married Miss Dorcas Anna Twiss from Co. Kerry Witnesses: Harte, William Johnston Esq. of Coolruss, Co. Limerick & Sullivan, James – servant to Mr. Blennerhasset

1798 Jan 9th Gordon John, Sir Baronet of Park, Co. Banff married Miss Pyne Crosbie from Limerick dau to Hon. & Rev. Maurice Crosbie of Limerick Witnesses: Crosbie, Mrs. – mother to Miss Pyne & Morgell, Robert Hickson, Esq of Rathkeale, Co. Limerick & Wade, Mickel servant to Sir John Gordon

1799 Sept 22nd Meade, Christopher Henry Barry from Limerick married Miss Ann Fulton from Lisburn, Co. Antrim Witnesses: Fulton, Ann, Mrs & Major, John Esq. Cornet 22nd Dragoons & Murray, Alexander Commander of hilsborough Packet

1799 Sept 30th Hunt Henry Esq. from Golden Garden, Co. Tipperary married Miss Mary Bradshaw Limerick City Witnesses: Bradshaw, Mary of Limerick & Bradshaw, Benjamin Bennet, Esq, Mount William, Co. Tipperary & Buchanan, John: Ensign Perthshire Militia

1799 Oct 7th Naish Carroll Patrick, Esq from Ballyann, Co. Limericj married Miss Ann Johnson from Bettyville, Co. Limerick Witnesses: Johnson, William, jun. Esq – Bettyville & MacKenzie, James: Vintner & Ker, John Portapatick

1800 May 7th Creaghe Martin Connell, M.D. Limerick City married Miss Mary Lacy from Limerick City

1802 Dec 18th Sherlock Thomas, Esq from Rock Abbey, Co. Cork married Miss Mary Bevan from Miltown, Co. Limerick Witnesses: Bennett, James: Newbridge, Co. Limerick & O’Callahan, Daniel, Co. Limerick

1803 April 14th Copley John, Esq from Ballyclough, Co. Limerick married Miss Dorothea Stack from Ballyconry, Co. kerry Witnesses: Stack, John sq. Ballyconry, Co. Limerick & Monsell, Samuel, Mallow Co. Cork

1805 Jan 7th Johnston Nicholas George, Lieutenant 2nd Batt 61st Rgt of foot married Miss Mary Ann Keating from Limerick City dau of George Keating Esq. Doctor of Medicine

1805 May 20th Frewen Thomas, Esq from Castle connel, co. Limerick married Miss Margaret Dundun from Castleconnel, Co Limerick

1806 Aug 3rd Kingston Robert, Esq from London City Miss Charlotte Burdett from Limerick City

1807 May 7th Hogg Edmond William, Esq from Limerick City married Miss Mary Sargent from Limerick City dau of James Sargent, Esq of Limerick City Witness: Bell, James Belfast

1817 Aug 5th Head Michael Prattle, Esq from Derry castle, Co. Tipperary married Miss Mary Butler from Limerick

1822 April 24th Evans John, Esq from Limerick City married Miss Jemima Sexton Jemima, from Limerick City Witness: Sexton, William

1824 Oct 15th Lloyd Eyre, Esq from Limerick maried Miss Anne Hutchinson Masey from Limerick Witness: Wallace, Patrick servant to Eyre Lloyd

1826 Feb 6th Holmes Robert of Glennanore Esq from Castletown Roache, Co.Cork married Catherine Wilkinson Catherine, spinster from Mallow, Co. Cork Witness: Wilkinson, Francis of Limerick

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Omagh Assizes, Co. Tyrone, April 1797

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In the Spring months of 1797, the County of Tyrone passed into what could be and was called a state of ‘smothered revolt.’ The Government forces indeed acted strongly, as the Spring Assizes at Omagh in the beginning of April testify. Newton, the Coagh magistrate, was at Omagh ; from which place he wrote to the Revd. D. O’Connor in Dublin on the 4th of the month.(1) He informed him that the juries were packed with gentry, as the middle classes could not be depended upon to “do Justice.” The United Men were put in on lesser charges in order to absolutely ensure convictions (even though conviction in such cases resulted only in transportation  whereas the penalty for the graver charges was the death penalty. The motto of the prosecution seems to have been convictions at all cost). Four United men were taken at Newtownstewart, Newton informed O’Connor, “with white shirts on them in the dead of night.” John Toler, the Solicitor-General, (later Lord Norbury the infamous hanging judge and buffoon of the Irish bench) came down to Omagh to prosecute at the Assizes. He too wrote to Dublin outlining a few of his triumphs. He began his letter with a mundane item of commerce (2) “Linen yarn has risen this day at Omagh Fair from ¼ to 2/4 a spangle above the last market.” He then proceeded:

“Yesterday morn, (he was writing on April 5th) Owen Mc Bryan was brought in a prisoner here having been taken in the act of robbing a house of arms within 7 miles of the above town (Omagh) on the night before last. I ordered a bill of indictment to be sent up forthwith and brought on the trial instanter as the witnesses and prisoner were produced in court full of blood from the gallant defence made against the gang which consisted of 5 or 6, the rest of whom escaped. The prisoner who was servant to a private distiller was armed with a gun charged with slugs which was taken with him. The trial lasted about an hour when there was a verdict of guilty without leaving the box …. As the town was much crowded the prisoner was ordered to immediate execution.”

Three young men were also convicted of firing at Colonel Leith, Toler continues; apparently anything less than capital convictions did not merit mention in his eyes for he makes no reference to the many United men convicted of lesser charges. He concluded his letter thus: “This country has been in a most alarming state and the number of prisoners beyond belief.”

Dean Warburton, writing of the Armagh Assizes of the same Spring said that there were(3) “no juries, no prosecutions, no evidences against any person under the denomination of a United man.” The Tyrone Loyalists did get some minor results, but from their point of view they were disappointing. Over 100 persons were tried according to another letter of Toler at the end of the Assizes(4) But although practically all of them must in the eyes of the Government have been indictable on capital charges, they only secured four or five capital convictions. Connsidering that the Juries were packed and therefore as favourable as posssible to the prosecution, the outcome leads to one conclusion, namely that witnesses could not be induced to come forward through fear of reprisals. Andrew Newton thought poorly of the results. From Coagh on 3rd May he wrote (5):-

“I am extremely sorry to inform you that every day in this country affairs appear to have a more gloomy aspect. Men who here-tofore reprobated the conduct of the disaffected have totally changed their sentiments. This change has arisen in my opinion from the multitude of people taken up, without, I may say, any capital conviction.

To conclude our review of the Spring Assizes, we may quote some more of Toler’s letter at the end of the Assizes(6):-

In the course of the trials of more than 100 persons here it appears that the oaths and engagements are to reduce rents, tythes and that they would join the French when they landed. As to emancipation or reform they have no other idea connected with them but that they are to have the country themselves.

(1) Rebellion papers, 620/29/196.
(2) id., 620/29/182
(3) LECKY, History of Ireland … , Vol. iv, p. 31.
(4) Rebellion Papers, 620/29/336.
(5) id., 620/30/11.

Taken from “The United Irishmen in Co. Tyrone” – Published in Seanchas Ardmhaca, 1960/61
Author : Brendan McEvoy Vol 4, No. 1, pp 1-32

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United Irishmen, Co. Tyrone, 1797

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An extract – Chapter V : 1797 : January to April

Andrew Newton on the 1st of February 1797 informed a correspondent (1)

I know there was an ambassador from the Provincial Committee in Belfast last week to this place and that at this instant there is one from this (place) now in Belfast.

The information above concerning the United Irish society in Aughyarn, gives us some interesting information about the composition of a society; we may summarise a few conclusions that can be drawn from it.

A. An analysis of the names and the surnames (not, we know, an infallible guide) together with the fact that some of those mentioned were Defenders and others Yeomen indicates that the Corps was composed of both Protestants and Catholics. The analysis of the names would indicate that a majority were Protestant, and the number of Scottish names would lead one to surmise that at least quite a few of them were Dissenters.
B. Of the 42 men listed, 7 are definitely listed as being or having been members of the Yeomanry: one of them even was a sergeant of the Yeomen. This surely indicates intensive activity, for to convert the Yeomen must have been no easy task.
C. At least 2 of the Corps were former Defenders; they are listed as such.
D. The Corps met in various places. It met in the Catholic Chapel of Aughyarn at night; the main business at that meeting seems to have been the administration of oaths. There seem to have been several Protestants in the Chapel at that time. The Corps met also in an office-house of lame Andrew Sproull in Altamullin, in an office-house of Robert Neelan of Mornabeg, somewhere in Lisleen, and on Mullinabreen Hill.
E. The Corps was well organised and must have had a full complement, for there is mention of Captains, Lieutenants, Sergeants. There seems also to have been a certain amount of competition for Commissions, for there is specific mention of polling on two men for a Lieutenancy.
F. Members of the Corps were active in more positive acts of treason than taking oaths: two of them are specified as being concerned in raiding for arms .

Joseph Castles or Cassels of Aughnacloy

We maybe pardoned for giving some special mention to one United Irishman, namely Joseph Castles of Aughnacloy. We have already met his name. In the examination of John G- (Sergeant in the Manx Fencibles) taken before J. Hill, on 28th December 1796 the deponent outlined a meeting which he had with Castles in Aughnacloy.(2) On the strength of this information Magistrate-Parson John Hill made out a warrant for the arrest of Castles: writing to Beresford in February he mentioned, inter alia (3):-

“Cassells a watchmaker of Aughnacloy is now at Omagh Jail; it was at his house they generally met. It was upon a warrant of mine he was taken. He is a very leading man.”

The meetings in Cassells’ house seem to have been meetings of the County committee. The arrest of Cassells was not so easily effected, if we may believe Edward Moore, the rabidly loyalist Post-master of Aughhnacloy who wrote to John Lees of the General Post Office, Dublin on February 1st, 1797(4):-

“I found of late that it is almost impossible to rely on the Constables that are in this place, particularly where the Law is to be executed against United Irishmen. I had myself sworn a Constable for the County of Tyrone for 6 months.”

Thus fortified with the majesty of the law, and with the assistance of nine Dragoons, he arrested Cassells. On 5th February he laid some information, which is in the State Paper Office. It included the following (5) :

“I have taken one of the ringleaders of the United Irishmen in Aughnacloy, one Joseph Castles, a watchmaker, charged with having sworn a number of persons to unlawful oaths and other treasonable practises. Hope in a short time to bring more of them to Justice.”

Thomas Knox was gladdened by the arrest of Cassells. On February 4th he wrote from Dungannon to Sir George Hill (6):_ “Cassells is safe at Omagh. The people of Aughnacloy (a vile lot) were intended to rescue him.”

Movement takes the initiative
The failure of the French Expedition, and the arrest of their leaders were indeed checks to the United Irishmen; yet these checks together with the proclamation of many districts did not destroy the United Irish movement, in fact, it soon recovered from these blows, and was causing the Government authorities no little concern as the following letter from Lake to Pelham on 13th March 1797 will show (7) :-

“I think it necessary to say that from every information we receive that matters are drawing to a crisis and that there is a determination to rise very shortly .

Every town brings some fresh accounts of these scoundrels’ success in swearing in the men of the Militia; whether every report is true I cannot say, but I believe there is foundation for them and as I am so urged by General Knox and Lord Cavan to get them out of the district, I have to request you will if possible send Fencibles in their room. General Knox has received intelligence that the artillery and Militia men attached to the guns in Charlemont had determined to give up the fort whenever a Rising should take place General Knox has sent a strong detachment of the Northampton Fencibles into the Fort of Charlemont and sent the artillery men into the town keeping a sufficient for the guns.”

The Government already had felt it necessary to adopt new measures.

The latest measure really was to hand over the coercive powers already in operation in the proclaimed areas to the military to be ruthlessly enforced by them. The main purpose of the measure was to disarm the inhabitants; the authority was trammelled by no limitations whatever, as was expressly stated to General Lake, the Commander-in-Chief of the North. To this man there went forth from Dublin Castle on March 3rd, 1797 two letters, part of which I will quote;-

(A.) An explanatory covering letter from Secretary Pelham to General Lake regarding the instructions from the Lord Lieutenant to disarm the inhabitants of the Northern Districts. (8)

Dear Sir,
You will receive by the same messenger who will deliver this letter to you an official authority from the Lord Lieutenant to disarm the inhabitants of the North of Ireland suspected of disaffection. The authority is full without limitation excepting what your discretion may suggest You are aware that the great part of the counties, Down, Armagh, Antrim, Tyrone and Derry, are already proclaimed and consequently that the magistrates have authority this moment to carry this measure into effect, and it is much to be lamented that those gentlemen who urged the measure of the proclaiming were not prepared to carry the most efficient part of the Bill in to effect.”

The letter then goes on to re-enumerate the powers in less official language. I give a summary of them :-

1. Power to order registration of arms.
2. Power of search in houses and grounds of persons who have not registered arms or are suspected of giving a false account.
3. Power of arresting strangers.
4. Power of imposing curfew, and arresting ‘in fields, street, or road,’ anyone breaking it.
5. Power to enter houses in curfew, (absentees to incur the penalties of idle and disorderly persons).
6. Power to impound their arms from even qualified and registered owners.

(B). Instructions from the Lord Lieutenant to Lieut-General Lake with respect to disarming the inhabitants of the Northern District. (9)

Sir,
I am commanded by the Lord Lieutenant to acquaint you that from information received by His Excellency with respect to various parts of the North of Ireland, additional measures to those hitherto employed for preserving the public peace are become necessary. It appears that in the Counties of Down, Antrim, Tyrone, Derry and Donegal, secret and treasonable Associations still continue to an alarming degree, and that the persons concerned in these associations are attempting to defeat all the exertions of the loyal and well-disposed by the means of terror, that they threaten the lives of all those who shall venture from respect to their duty and oath of Allegiance to discover their treasons, that they assemble in great numbers by night, and by threats and force disarm the peaceable inhabitants; that they have fired on His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace when endeavouring to apprehend them in their nocturnal robberies; that they threaten by papers, letters, notices the persons of those who shall in any manner resist or oppose them; that in their nightly excursions for the purpose of disarming His Majesty’s loyal subjects they disguise their persons and countenances; that they endeavour to to collect great quantities of arms in concealed hiding places; that they cut down great numbers of trees on the estates of the gentry for the purpose of making pikes; that they have stolen great quantities of lead for the casting of bullets; that they privately by night exercise themselves in the practice of arms; that they endeavour to intimidate persons from joining the Yeomanry Corps established by law in order to resist a foreign enemy; that they refuse to employ in manufactures those who enlist in the said Corps; that they not only threaten but illtreat the persons of the Yeomen and even attack their houses by night and proceed to the barbarous extremity of deliberate and shocking murder … and that they profess a resolution to assist the enemies of His Majesty, if they should be enabled to land in this Kingdom. It further appears that the disturbances and outrages exist and even increase as well in the districts which have been proclaimed .

T. Pelham.

This certainly gives a startling view of the activities of the United Irishmen. The gentleman who now took over the control of the loyalist forces in the Eastern half of Tyrone was Brigadier-General John Knox, who made his Headquarters in Dungannon, and in West Tyrone it was Lord Cavan, in whose area of operations the Baronies of Omagh and Strabane lay.

It is remarkable that the course of action which was now adopted seems to have had no sanction of law; it was as illegal as the operations of the United men themselves. But that deterred nobody. Lake in Belfast informed the Government on March 13th that all the information he received tended to convince him that a speedy rising when the French arrived was determined upon, and urged that every precaution be taken; for his part he will impose “coercive measures in the strongest degree.” General Knox at Dungannon seems to have adopted the policy which had been .adopted already by his brother, magistrate Thomas Knox, namely of setting the Orangemen and the United men at loggerheads.

In the same month of March he wrote (10):-

But in the …. part of Tyrone, through which my brigade is at present quartered, a proportion of the people are hostile to the United Irishmen – particularly those calling themselves Orangemen …. I have arranged a plan to scour a district full of registered arms or said to be so …. and this I do not so much with a hope to succeed to any extent as to increase the animosity between ‘the Orangemen and the United Irishmen or Liberty men as they call themselves. Upon that animosity depends the safety of the Central Counties of the North.

Knox saw the incongruity of the Government measures which tried to impose Martial Law and to keep up still the facade at least of sustaining the Civil Code. He expressed this in a long letter to Pelham(11), on April 19th, 1797, in which he urged in the strongest terms the imposition of full Martial Law and the reduction of the whole North to utter subjection as if it were a foreign country at war with Britain. Having reduced it, he urged that the Government then offer the people Catholic Emancipation, Parliamentary Reform, and some Agrarian Reform in return for a Union with England. This he saw as the solution of the troubles that beset Ireland. He was particularly hostile to the Landlords in whom he seems to have seen no good. Knox went so far as to resign (or send in his resignation) on May 11th, 1797, nominally over a disagreement with other officers, but really, it would appear, over policy. When complete Martial Law was mooted, Knox quickly withdrew his resignation (Letter of May 12th) (12) :

“Since my letter of yesterday (his letter of resignation) I have learnt that the Report of the Secret Committee may induce Government to adopt decisive measures and proclaim Martial Law. I, therefore, request you will delay my resignation for a few days -as if Martial Law is proclaimed I wish above all things to assist in crushing the Jacobins of the North. “

Under the direction of Knox the Loyalists got more active. Here is an extract from a letter of the Reverend Armstrong to Mr. Knox dated 9th March 1797 (13) :

“I have got possession of 6 muskets in good order all charged, the locks off, found in the house of Catherwoods father beyond Stewartstown (Catherwood a watchmaker of Stewartstown now confined in Charlemont) against whom I received information for having a quantity of arms concealed; the old gentleman said they were registered. We have got two notorious Liberty men here from Munterevlyn, wealthy farmers. There was a third Liberated on bail in consequence of his having some days ago lodged a strong information against that unfortunate man, Mr. Russell.”

The name” Catherwood” is surely a mistake for Calderwood. Regular guards and patrols were established and the registration of arms was carried on. J. Knox writing to Lenox-Conyingham from Dungannon, on March 21st, 1797 said: “The United are taking up arms about Carranteel, I think that as soon as the registry business is settled, we shall recover most of the arms in the Barony(14).”

Another example of activity is afforded by the letter of Robert Lowry of Pomeroy to Pelham, dated 23rd March 1797 (15):

“Sir, ….
I waited on General Knox and by his direction have established a guard of 10 men to be stationed night about in the Church School-houses which are about 3 miles distant …. I had the Company out searching for arms. (The company consists of only 63) and neither met nor heard any person on our patrol. But what I dislike most in the appearance of the country, is the few arms I got the day I was out, I found safely built up in turf-stacks, well-charged with locks and screws off. On the guns being found, some gave me up the locks etc. Others I had information against refusing to give up any-swearing in the most solemn manner that they knew nothing of either guns or locks, I took the law into my own hands, made prisoners of them and sent them to the guardroom, promising to send them to jail the next morn, which had the desired effect for every gun, lock etc. was sent for and delivered up, perfectly clean and better appointed with flints than those I got from Government; We are at present tolerably quiet, but still dreadfully disaffected and I am sure the United business is coalescing more now than it was two months ago – for I thought it had at that time got a check, which I am sorry to say is not the case at present.”

With the warning of Lowry to Pelham that the United Irishmen are again advancing we take up the story of the proceedings of the Liberty men. The arrest of Joseph Castles did not apparently cow the rebels of Aughnacloy. Edward Moore, who arrested Castles, informed John Lees on the 30th of March(16) that the people of the town were every day becoming more and more disloyal and in their disloyalty more and more daring. They were disarming everyone who would not join the movement; they had damaged the house of Mr. Moore, the landlord and magistrate of the area; they had smashed his own windows; and they were threatening his life. “They don’t hesitate to say I will be sent after Hamilton (meaning the late Dr. Hamilton).”

The Report of the Committee of Secrecy of the Commons in Ireland (August 21st, 1798) included some information of the Provincial meetings of Ulster (17)• At the Provincial meeting on 14th April 1797 a census of the men and equipment in the different Counties was taken. The census for County Tyrone was :-

United Irishmen …………………14,000
Guns …………………………….     950
Bayonets ………………………     2,000
Pikes ……………………………    2,000
Lbs. of Powder …………………        90
Ball cartridges…………………    .2,263
Balls……………………………         427
Yeomen ……………………….        423

This list of men and arms is indeed formidable, especially when we remember the amount of arms confiscated by the magistrates, Yeomen, and Military. It would appear as if at least 2,000 men were prepared to take the field. Incidentally the number of United men had increased enormously since the Provincial meeting of the 24th of January of the same year when it was given for Tyrone as 7,500. This surely points to great activity in the month of March 1797, when we remember the check they had received in the beginning of the year.

(1) id., 620/28/206.
(2) id., 620/26/174.
(3) id., 620/28/285.
(4)td., 620/28/216.
(5) id., 620/28/260.
(6) id., 620/28/231.
(7) Pelham transcripts. T.755, Vol. IV, p. 165.
(8)McCance Collection, P.R.O. Belfast.
(9) ibid.
(10) LECKY ; History of Ireland in 18th century.
(11) Pelham transcripts, Vol. IV, p. 287.
(12) Pelham transcripts, Vol. IV, p. 28.
(13) Rebellion papers, 620/29/51.
(14) LENOX-CONYNGHAM, An old Ulster house, p. 139.
(15) Rebellion papers, 620/29/195.
(16) id., 620/29/142.
(17) Report of committee of secrecy of the House of Commons of Ireland.

Taken from “The United Irishmen in Co. Tyrone”. Published in Seanchas Ardmhaca, 1960/61.
Author: Brendan McEvoy Vol 4, No. 1, pp 1-32.

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Galway City Freemen, 1794

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“On the 9th of April 1793 the Irish Parliament passed a statute entitled.”

An Act fot the Relief of His Majesty’s Popish, or Roman Catholic, subjects of Ireland (33rd George III., chap. 21) whereby Catholics were enabled to become Freemen of Corporate Towns in Ireland without taking the Oath of Abjuration, upon taking merely an Oath of Allegiance to the King.On the 29th of April 1794 the following list of 300 Roman Catholics who had been admitted as Freemen or Burgesses of the Corporation of the City of Galway under the provisions of the above mentioned Act, was certified by Elieas Tankerville, Secretary and John Bradley, Notary Public at Galway. In this list 20 names are those of the ‘Tribe’ families and are indicated by the letter T, the remaining 280 names are those of ‘non-tribe’ families.

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Baptism Records, Kilnasoolagh, Co. Clare, 1785-93

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Kilnasoolagh, Co. Clare,(aka Killenasulagh), Ireland

Diocese of Killaloe

National Archives of Ireland film number MFCI5, M5222

Baptisms: 24th Feb 1785-20th June 1824
Burials 31st. Dec 1786 – 26th April 1828
Marriages: 1st Jan 1799 – 1st Feb 1820
Some mixed event entries on scattered pages 14th July 1823 – 21st June 1829

Baptismal Extracts

Feb 24th, 1785
Ann, the daughter of Ann & Thomas Studdert, Esq., Privately

April 1st, 1785
Frances the daughter of Ma?ry and John McNamara, Esqr. Privately

April 24th, 1785.
John the son of Thomas and Frances Roche. Eliza Fitzgerald, James Fitzgerald, Charles Creagh Esqr., the sponsors

May 5th.1785.
William, the Son of Samuel and Mary Scales. Sarah Jones, William Stamer, Paul Edwards, the Sponsors.

May 15th, 1785.
Hannah, the Daughter of Ambrose & Cecilia Woods. Elizabeth Crosson, Ellen Cross, James Hogan – Sponsors

June 12th, 1785.
Henry Jeremiah, the Son of Sir Lucius & Lady O’Brien. Privately.

September 6th, 1785
John the Son of Doragh and ?Matthew Blood, Esq. Privately

November 6th, 1785
Letitia & Maria, the twin daughters of John & Catherine Jordan. Privately

Burial : January 9th, 1788.
Miss Mary Blood was interred at Killenasulagh

April 20th, 1788
Diana, the Daughter of Anne & James Creagh, Esq., was baptized privately

June 16th, 1788
Anne Coffoe, a foundling was baptised privately.

Burial : November 29th, 1788
Luke Hickman junior, Esq., was interred at Killenasulagh

December 15th 1788
Jane, the Daughter of George & Catherine Austin was baptised. Catherine Dophin, Winny Shea and Joseph Woods sponsors.

Janry 4th, 1789. Henrietta, Catherine. Donatius, Lucinda, Anna Maria, Sydney and Henry Jeremiah, the children of the Right Honerable Sir Lucius & Lady O’Brien were received into the Church. And on the same day, William the son of Mary and Donatius O’Brien, Esq., and Robert the son of Mary and Acheson Trench, Esqr., were also received into the church.

January 6th, 1789.
Elenor, the daughter of ?Trophina & Thomas Roche, privately.

January 15th, 1789
Bridget, the Daughter of James and Mary Nash, privately

February 10th, 1789. Benjamin, the Son of Selena & Michael Hays, Lady O’Brien, Miss Harriet O’Brien, Thomas Arthur, junior Esqr., & Mr Benjamin Sergent, Sponsors.

April 3rd, 1789
Ellen, the Daugher of Anne & James Creagh, Esqr. Privately

Burial : June 21st, 1789. Thomas Hickman Esqr., interred at Killenasulagh

Burial : July 7th, 1789. Mrs. Henrietta O’Brien interred at Killenasulagh

Burial : July 29th, 1789. Miss Ellen Creagh interred at Killenasulagh

September 6th, 1789
Alexander, the Son of Martin & Diana Connolly: Miss Isabella Halloran, Jane Waters, Matthew Weeks & Haddock Mason, Sponsors.

Burial : January 12th, 1790
Samuel Cross was interred at Killenasulagh

April ?8th, 1790
Conner Williams, the son of Right Honble Lucius and Lady O’Brien was baptised privately

November 21st, ?1791
Mary the daughter of Dorothea and Mat. Blood Esq., baptised privately.

Burial : March 7th, 1792
Michael Fitzgerald, Esq., interred at Killenasulagh.

Burial : March 22nd
William Butler Esq., interred at Killenasulagh

Burial : January 15th
Mrs. Eleanor Byrn interred at Killenasulagh

February 25th, 1792
Margret (sic) the daughter of George & Catherine Austin: Eleanor Woods, Catherine Dolphin and John Woods sponsors.

March 17th, 1793
Mary the Daughter of Adam and Elizabeth ?Song : Haddock Mason, Anne Mason and Jane Mason, Sponsors

August 19th, 1793.
Catherine Anne, the daughter of Anne & James Creagh Esq., baptised privately.

Burial : August 26th, 1793.
Mrs. Jane Austin interred at Killenasulagh

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