Tag Archives: Poor Law Union

Armagh : Poor Law Union Townlands

Civil Registration Districts (Poor Law Unions)

Armagh Poor Law Unions = Civil Registration Districts (after civil registration was introduced)

  1. Armagh
  2. Banbridge
  3. Castleblayney
  4. Dundalk
  5. Lurgan
  6. Newry

Townlands in each Poor Law Union (Civil Registration District) as per townlands listed in 1851 census of Ireland.  The web page to which you are being directed below is hosted by the Leitrim Roscommon Genealogy web site.  The book from which the list of placenames was created was based on the townlands listed in the Irish 1851 census and a man who we all knew as John Broderick a.k.a. Sean Ruad (R.I.P.) was responsible for having the whole book typed up by helpful individuals over a number of years.  This book the ‘General Alphabetical Index to the Townlands and Towns, Parishes & Baronies of Ireland’, which was printed by Alexander Thom & Co. of Dublin, gives you the size of a townland, the barony that the townland was in, the name of the civil parish, and the name of the Poor Law Union.  The names of some of these townlands have changed or may be known under a different spelling locally.  Some errors were noted in the Co. Laois placenames and this may have occurred with other placenames as the book was typed up.

Poor Law Unions (Civil Registration Districts) spread through more than one county at times e.g. in this list we have Dundalk and the town of Dundalk is actually in Co. Louth.  Anyone born, married or died in one of the townlands of the Dundalk Poor Law Union/Civil Registration District will be registered under Dundalk Poor Law Union or Civil Registration District and not as part of Co. Armagh.

Armagh Poor Law Union

Banbridge Poor Law Union

Castleblayney Poor Law Union

Dundalk Poor Law Union

Lurgan Poor Law Union

Newry Poor Law Union

Poor Law Union/Civil Registration District, Antrim

Poor Law Union = Civil Registration District
Antrim

  1. Antrim
  2. Ballycastle
  3. Ballymoney
  4. Ballymena
  5. Belfast
  6. Coleraine
  7. Larne
  8. Lisburn
  9. Lurgan

Townlands in each Poor Law Union (Civil Registration District) as per townlands listed in 1851 census of Ireland.  The web page to which you are being directed below is hosted by the Leitrim Roscommon Genealogy web site.  The book from which the list of placenames was created was based on the townlands listed in the Irish 1851 census and a man who we all knew as John Broderick a.k.a. Sean Ruad (R.I.P.) was responsible for having the whole book typed up by helpful individuals over a number of years.  This book the ‘General Alphabetical Index to the Townlands and Towns, Parishes & Baronies of Ireland’, which was printed by Alexander Thom & Co. of Dublin, gives you the size of a townland, the barony that the townland was in, the name of the civil parish, and the name of the Poor Law Union.  The names of some of these townlands have changed or may be known under a different spelling locally.  Poor Law Unions (Civil Registration Districts) spread through more than one county at times e.g. in this list we have Coleraine and Coleraine town is in Derry or Londonderry County.  Anyone born, married or died in one of the townlands of the Coleraine Poor Law Union/Civil Registration District will be registered under Coleraine and not as part of Antrim.

Antrim Poor Law Union

Ballycastle Poor Law Union

Ballymoney Poor Law Union

Ballymena Poor Law Union

Belfast Poor Law Union

Coleraine Poor Law Union

Larne Poor Law Union

Lisburn Poor Law Union

Lurgan poor Law Union

Donegal. Poor Law Unions: Civil Registration Districts

Poor Law Union = Civil Registration District
Donegal

  1. Ballyshannon
  2. Donegal
  3. Dunfanaghy
  4. Glenties
  5. Letterkenny
  6. Londonderry
  7. Milford
  8. Strabane
  9. Stranorlar
  10. Inishowen

Townlands in each Poor Law Union (Civil Registration District) as per townlands listed in 1851 census of Ireland.  The web page to which you are being directed below is hosted by the Leitrim Roscommon Genealogy web site.  The book from which the list of placenames was created was based on the townlands listed in the Irish 1851 census and a man who we all knew as John Broderick a.k.a. Sean Ruad (R.I.P.) was responsible for having the whole book typed up by helpful individuals over a number of years.  This book the ‘General Alphabetical Index to the Townlands and Towns, Parishes & Baronies of Ireland’, which was printed by Alexander Thom & Co. of Dublin, gives you the size of a townland, the barony that the townland was in, the name of the civil parish, and the name of the Poor Law Union.  The names of some of these townlands have changed or may be known under a different spelling locally.  Poor Law Unions (Civil Registration Districts) spread through more than one county at times e.g. in this list we have Londonderry which belongs to Co. Derry (Londonderry) and we also have Stranbane whichis in  Co. Tyrone.  People born, married or died in any townland in Co. Donegal which belongs to Londonderry or Strabane Poor Law Union/Civil Registration District will have been registered in either Londonderry or Strabane Poor Law Union and not in a Donegal union.

Ballyshannon Poor Law Union

Donegal Poor Law Union

Dunfanaghy Poor Law Union

Glenties Poor Law Union

Letterkenny Poor Law Union

Londonderry Poor Law Union

Millford Poor Law Union

Strabane Poor Law Union

Stranorlar Poor Law Union

Inishowen poor Law Union

Labourer’s Rent, Rate Collection, Rathkeale, 1887

Rents of Labourer’s Cottages

The Clerk reported that there were some arrears on the rents of labourer’s cottages, generally from one to five weeks, but there are about 12 weeks due on one woman in Iverus, whose uhsband had died. He wished to know would there be proceedings taken against her.
Mr.Naughton said that the woman in question was very poor and had a large family.
Mr. Hewson thought the rule they had made could not be broken. The money had been given them to provide house for the labourers and he thought it their duty to see that the rent was collected. It was agreed to adhere to their usual rule of proceeding against any tenant who owed more than four weeks rent.

Unsatisfactory State of the Rate Collection

The Clerk drew the attention of the Board to the state of the rate collection, which he described as being in a most unsatisfactory condition. As the time would expire in a very short time, there were very many reasons why the rates should be collected. In the first place they were in debt and they could not pay all their bills today. This was the first time they could not meet their liabilities. The Treasurer he believed, would honour their cheques to the extent of four or five hundred pounds., but there were some £500 more
which could not be paid for the present. The collectors had been requested to have a sum collected, but apparently they had disregarded the order of the board.

Mr. Maunsell: How much is outstanding?
The Clerk: There are £4,000 outstanding.
Mr. Hewson: I think the collectors are running about the country in a way I never saw them before.
The Clerk : I think they ought to do much more than they have done.
Mr. Switzer: There are plenty fellows now swaggering around and paying nothing at all, and I don’t see why those fellows should be swaggering around while we pay the rates.
The Clerk : The collectors ought to be requested to collect the rates.
A Guardian said that the people would be better able to pay in a month’s time.
Mr. hewson said he would be in favour of not issuing cheques to these people to whome they owed money, and who were not pressing for payment. Everybody had to wait for money now, and h did no t see why the people there , any of them who could afford to wait, should not wait for a fortnight or a month instead of pressing the ratepayers as they were doing. He would rather do that than increase their indebtedness to the bank.
Mr. Maunsell: I think pressure ought to be put on the collectors.
Mr. Switzer: Of course we are supposed to represent the people in a certain sense, as elected Guardians from the people themselves. Now, there are some of those you know who won’t pay any rates. They are schemers, don’t you see – they will do nothing, and when we represent them I don’t see why we should not compel them to be equal to every other honest man.
The Chairman : How is it they are not compelled to pay rates?
Mr. Switzer: That is what I want to come to. They won’t pay anything. I am full sure that many of them are able to pay, and hey swagger around and won’t pay.
Mr. Hewson said that the persons referred to, though they might have plenty of money in their pockets, might not at the same time possess any goods capable of being seized in satisfaction for the rates.
Mr. Switzer; But idlers and schemers won’t pay anything.
Mr. Maunsell: Are you going to bring any pressure to bear on the collectors?
The Clerk said he had made an order urgently requesting them to collect the outstanding rates.

Taken from “The Munster News and Limerick and Clare Advocate”,
April 2, 1887

Rathkeale Dispensary Committee, 1887

There was one vacancy in the Committee of the Rathkeale Dispensary District, caused by the death of Mr. Blennerhasset, and it was filled up by the election of Mr. Keating.
Mr. Naughton was subsequently about to propose another man on the Committee when
The Chairman stated that Mr. Naughton was too late, the vacancy that existed having been filled up.

Mr. Naughton held that his proposition was quite in order and ought to be received.
The Chairman said that if his ruling on the matter were questioned he would put it to a poll.
Mr. Hewson hoped the Chairman would stick to his ruling, and not put the matter to the board.

The Chairman was about pressing the next business, when Mr. Curtin said : You are after saying this minute you would put it to a division, Mr. Chairman.
The Chairman: I will put it to a division now.
A Guardian : I beg your pardon Mr. Chairman, I don’t think you can do that.
The Chairman : It is quite uncalled for, Mr. Curtin, to be going on in this manner.
Mr. Maunsell : It is a question entirely for the Chairman. If he decides to put it to a division h can.
Mr. Hewson said if this question were opened now, it might be that in half an hour’s time again another guardian would raise the matter on the new when most of the members of the board would have left.
The Clerk: I think it would be tantamount to a vote of censure on the Chairman –
Mr. Piggott (sic) Go on to the next business, Mr. Chairman.
A Guardian: I think whatever the Chairman has done, he has done properly.
The matter then ended.

Taken from “The Munster News and Limerick and Clare Advocate”, April 2, 1887

Rathkeale Poor Law Union, Election of Chairman, 1887

Once again in this newspaper extraction you will see that the journalist does not use the same spelling for a name in all instances, e.g. Pigott and Piggott

J.P. = Justice of the Peace

Rathkeale Board of Guardians
Election of Chairman
The usual weekly meeting of the Guardians of the Rathkeale Union was held on Wednesday, Mr. Patrick Cahill, Chairman, presiding. The other Guardians in attendance were : Messrs. B. Hewson, J.P. ; D. M. Maunsell, J.P. ; Joseph Casey, J. P. ; Carroll Nash, Cornelius Curtain, Robert Pigott, Edward Cussen, John M. Switzer, Thomas Lynch, Patrick Madigan, Edmond O’ Connor, Michael Naughtin, Timothy Foley, Thomas Lyons, Denis Scanlon, Daniel Ranahan, William O’Neill and Thomas Lyons.

Election of Chairman, etc.
The first business taken up was the election of Chairman, Vice-Chairman and Deputy Vice-Chairman for the opening year.
Mr. Joseph Casey proposed the election of Mr. P. Cahill, as Chairman and spoke in high terms of the manner in which he discharged his duty during the last year, and the peace and harmony that prevailed at the Board since he was first elected to the position.
Mr. Casey’s proposition having been duly seconded and there being no opposition.
Mr. Cahill was declared elected unanimously.
Mr. M. Naughton proposed the election of Mr. R. Pigott to the Vice-Chairmanship, and it having been seconded by Mr. T. Foley, the proposition was unanimously agreed to.
Mr. C. Curtin was elected to the position of Deputy Vice Chairman, having been proposed by Mr. T. Lyons and seconded by Mr. Daniel Ranahan.
The three Chairmen are Nationalists, and this is the first year in which no opposition has been shown from the Conservative members of the Board.
Taken from “The Munster News and Limerick and Clare Advocate”,
April 2, 1887