Category Archives: Journals

The Genealogical Society, Co. Cork

No. 1, 2001 – No. 2, 2002


CONTENTS No. 1

1. Extracts from the Estate Papers of Co. Cork No. 1; The Courtenay Papers – Jean Prendergast

2. The Moylan Brothers of Cork in the American Revolution – Anthony McCan

3. Corkonians Married at East Lane RC Chapel, Bermondsey, London, 1808-1816 – Transcribed by Audrey Moynihan

4. Suspected Fenians Arrested in Cork Mar. 4 to 23, 1867 – Jean Prendergast

5. Some Participants in the Manchester Martyr’s Procession, Cork 1867 – Jean Prendergast

6. What I did on my summer vacation (A Visit to Inchigeela) – Kathleen E. Flanagan

7. Letter from Fr. Tim Mahoney, 1900 – Transcribed by Kathleen E. Flanagan

8. Contributors to Poor Relief in Mallow, May 1846

9. Extracts from the Estate Papers of Co. Cork No. 2; The Doherty Papers; Estate of the Earl of Bandon Pt. 1 – Jean Prendergast

CONTENTS No 2, 2002

Burgesses of the City of Cork; Repeal Petition 1843
Jean Prendergast…………………………………………………………………………………………….4

Cork Insolvent Debtors 1843 Pt. 1
Anita Sheahan Coraluzzi………………………………………………………………………………….11

The West Cork O Connell Tribute Fund for 1842/3
Jean Prendergast…………………………………………………………………………………………….24

Extracts from the Doherty Papers (Estate of the Earl of Bandon), Pt. 2
Jean Prendergast…………………………………………………………………………………………….34

Pupils Attending the Presbyterian Charity School, Cork, in 1821
Jean Prendergast…………………………………………………………………………………………….53

Bantry Estate Rentals Dec. 1825 – Feb. 1826
Jean Prendergast ……………………………………………………………………………………………54

From Cork to Brazil in 1827; The Expedition of Col. William Cotter
Anthony McCan…………………………………………………………………………………………….59

Resurrectionists……………………………………………………………………………………………..61

The East Cork O Connell Tribute Fund for 1843
Jean Prendergast ……………………………………………………………………………………………62

Edmond O Loughlin (1837-1893), Fenian
Brendan Sisk ………………………………………………………………………………………………66

Lawrence Humphreys (1757-1835)
Rob Michael………………………………………………………………………………………………..67

The Duhallow & Muskerry O Connell Tribute Fund for 1842/3
Jean Prendergast………………………………………………………………………………………….68

The Ballyclough Station Book: 1843-53
Jean Prendergast………………………………………………………………………………………….73

Cork Spring Assizes 1843
Patty Pickett………………………………………………………………………………………………..76

The North East Cork O Connell Tribute Fund for 1842/3
Jean Prendergast………………………………………………………………………………………….80

East Riding Process Servers 1843…………………………………………………………………..88

The American Committee For Relief in Ireland And The Irish White Cross
Anita Sheahan Coraluzzi……………………………………………………………………………….89

Master Shoemakers of the City of Cork 1835…………………………………………………..92

Lismore Agricultural Society’s Ploughing Match for 1843……………………………………93

Surname/Nickname Index…………………………………………………………………………….94

Contact: Cork Genealogical Society,
c/o 12 Courtlands,
Silversprings,
Cork

Irish Journals: An Introduction

So many journals and so much information within their pages. Many ignore the likes of the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries in Ireland, what do genealogists want with an ‘Antiquarian’ journal. The first thing that spring to mind is archaeology when one thinks of antiquaries. The same can be said for all these journals lists as ‘Archaeological and Historical’ journals. What could possibly be in them that would be relevant to the family historian, the genealogist? History in school is always presented as facts and figures, so what would we find in an archaeological and historical journal?


A wealth of information – to those who went before the words ‘antiquary’ meant ‘about things past’ and that covered everything. They wrote parish histories, the gave lists and lists of names, they spoke of historical events – but not in the same way that we are ‘taught’ history in school. These were people who loved localities and topics with a passion and so they wrote about these places and these things. They wrote of folklore, traditions, customs, old words, meanings of words, placenames. It is in the older journals that we find the most information relevant to the genealogist. Todays publications tend to be more archaeological in content than in the past. Gradually, this web site will list the articles in these journals. Beginning now, with the first five years of ‘Seanchas’; ‘The Journal of the Waterford and South East of Ireland Archaeological and Historical Society’ and ‘The Journal of the Kildare Archaeological and Historical Society’. Two months from now, another five years will be added to each of these pages and a start will be made on ‘The Irish Ancestor’; ‘The Irish Genealogist’; ‘The Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society’ and ‘The Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society’.

Some of the journals listed here no longer exist, some may only have been published for a few years or a few volumes, some are the result of divisions of an earlier society, and some are the journals as named before that division. Some are produced by Historical Societies and others are simply published by enthusiastic local people on an annual basis.

Annelecta Hibernica

Archivum Hibernicum

Ardagh and Clonmacnoise Historical Society Journal

Ardmore Journal

Arklow Historical Society Journal

Athenry Journal

Bandon Historical Journal

Benbradagh – Dungiven parish magazine

Blackrock Society Proceedings

Bray Historical Record

Breifne

Breifny

Carlow past and present

Carlowviana

Carrickfergus and District Historical Society Journal

Charleville and District Historical Society Journal

Clogher Record – Clogher Historical Society

Cloughjordan Heritage

Collectiana Hibernicae
Cork Genealogical Society Journal

Craigavon Historical Society Review

Dál na gCais

Decies

Deenside

Derriana

Donegal Annual – Donegal Historical Society

Down & Connor Historical Society Magazine

Dublin Historical Record (Journal of the Old Dublin Society)

Dúchas Néill; Journal of the O’Neill Country Society

Duhallow Magazine (Seanchas Duhallow)

Dun Laoghaire Borough Historical Society

East Belfast Historical Society Journal

Eighteenth Century Ireland

Galvia (in Irish)

Glynns, The (Journal of the Glens of Antrim Historical Society)

History Ireland

Heart of Breifny

Historical Belfast Magazine

Irish Family Links

Irish Studies (publ. by the Irish American Cultural Institute)

In the Shadow of the Steeple – Tullaherin Heritage Society

Irish Family History Link to IFH Society.

Irish Historical Studies

Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad (Maynooth)

Journal of Irish Archaeology

Journal of the Ivernian Society (language, literature, music, art etc.)

Journal of the Bangor Historical Society

Journal of the Cork History and Archaeological Society

Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society

Journal of the Donegal Historical Society

Journal of the Dromore Dioscescan Family Historical Society (Seanchas Dhroim Mor)

Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society

Journal of the Galway Family History Society (Galway Roots)

Journal of the Glens of Antrim Historical Society (see Glynns)

Journal of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society

Journal of the Kildare Archaeological and Historical Society

Journal of the Kildare Society

Proceedings/Journal of the Kilkenny and South East of Ireland Archaeological and Historical Society

Journal of the Mourne Local Studies Group (12 Miles of Mourne)

Journal of the North Munster Archaeological Society (North Munster Antiquarian Society?)

Journal of the Old Athlone Society

Journal of the Old Drogheda Society

Journal of the Roscommon Historical and Archaeological Society

Journal of the Royal Antiquary Society of Ireland

Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries in Ireland

Journal of the Shannon Archaeological and Historical Society (The Other Clare)

Journal of the Waterford & South-East of Ireland Archaeological and Historical Society

Journal of the Waterford Archaeological and Historical Society

Journal of the Westport historical Society (Cathair na Mart)

Journal of the Wexford Historical Society

Journals of the Butler Society

Kenmare Literary and Historical Society

Kinsale Historical Journal

Lecale Miscellany

Limerick Field Journal

Lisburn Historical Society Journal

Local History Review

Lough Gur Historical Society Journal

Mallow Field Club

Mizen Journal

North Irish Roots. Journal of the North of Ireland Family History Society

North Mayo historical and Archaeological Society Journal

Old Athlone society

Old Blarney

Old Kilkenny Review

Old Limerick Journal

Old Newry Journal

Oughtera

Rathdowney Review

Reportorium Novum

Riocht na Midhe

Saintfield Heritage

Seanchas Ardmhaca

Seanchas Chairbre

South Derry Historical Society Journal

South Mayo Family History Research Journal

Teathbha

The Carlowvian

The Drumlin, a Journal of Cavan, Leitrim and Monaghan

The Glynns (see Glynns and Journal of the Glens of Antrim Historical Society)

The Irish Ancestor

The Irish Sword

The Past – Wexford’s Past

Roundwood Historical and Folklore Journal

Sliabh Aughty – East Clare heritage Journal

Studia Hibernica

Tempests Annual

Times Past

Tipperary Historical Journal

Transactions of the Ossory Archaeological Society

Ulster Journal of Archaeology

Progress and Suppression

Extract from the Galway Journal of Archaeology & Historical Society. Progress and Suppression of the United Irishmen in the Western Counties in 1798-1799. Rev. Patrick Egan. Published in the Journal of the Galway Archaeological & Historical Society VOL XXV Nos. 3 & 4 1953-54.


Contemporary or near contemporary published accounts of the Rebellion of 1798, those of Musgrave, Gordon, Plowden, Hay, Teeling and the rest, including Dr. Richard R. Madden, give scant reference to the belated rising in the western counties. Richard Hayes in ‘The Last Invasion of Ireland – When Connacht Rose’ has however, restored the balance and shown that when the French landed at Killala there were thousands, especially in the County Mayo, eager and waiting to join an insurrection. They were representative of all classes, Old Irish and Anglo-Irish, gentry, clergy, professional men, landowners, tradesmen, tenant farmers and labourers – all except the Ascendancy, a small Protestant minority, The insurgent leaders were anything but the notorious and desperate ruffians they were alleged to be by the prejudiced writers of the time. The Protestant bishop Stock bore witness to the extraordinary bravery of the untrained and ill-armed rank and file of the rebels on the battle field and remarked that “it is a circumstance worthy of particular notice, that during the whole time of this civil commotion, not a drop of blood was shed by the Connaught rebels, except in the field of war.” Stock’s sympathies lay not with the rebels and he was a deeply prejudiced writer in many respects, but honest as regards the facts which came within range of his own observation.1 Incidents of their singular bravery when taken out for execution after the suppression of the rising have been narrated by Dr. Hayes, 2 to which we might add the testimony of one of the most inhumane of the military leaders, Lieutenant General Lake, which refers in particular, however, to a district further south. Writing to the Castle from Limerick, on March 27, 1799, he says, “The Common people are more afraid of Corporal punishment

1. “The bishop in a publication on this event did them (the insurgents) ample justice, at the expense of his own translation” – Jonah Barrington ‘Rise and Fall of the Irish Nation,’ 1860 edition, p.367
2. 2. Op cit., passim

than of Death. From the moment that they see their Priest, they glory in the thoughts of it and become hardened beyond all imagination.” 3
The position in Connacht before the rebellion was somewhat different from that in the other provinces. Class antagonism, racial hatred and religious prejudice were less apparent there than ni other parts of Ireland and least of all in the counties of Galway and Mayo. The Protestant landowners were fewer than elsewhere, while the Catholic gentry were correspondingly more numerous and influential. Many of the native gentry, who had conformed to the Established Church to hold their property, were still, to some extent, united by race and blood to the tenant class.

When in December, 1791, the United Irishmen of Dublin issued a letter calling for the formation of societies for reform and Catholic emancipation it was followed by grovelling letters to the Viceroy from the Catholic aristocrats of, among other counties, Galway and Mayo, in disapproval of the determination of the Catholic Committee to sue for the repeal of the Penal Laws. 4 This was countered by meetings of Catholics in Galway and Roscommon in favour of the stand taken by the Catholic Committee. 5 Tone in his diary relates how in October, 1792, he had met the gentry of the West at the great fair of Ballinasloe and had at last secured their allegiance to the Catholic Committee. 6 The Catholic town of Galway, like Limerick, was loyalist 7 and the people of Connacht during the intervening years until 1798 were not provoked as they were in Ulster and elsewhere and remained comparatively quiet.
Musgrave, writing under a pseudonym, paints a different picture: “In short, in the years 1793, 1794, 1795 and 1796, the counties of Donegal, ‘Sligo, Mayo, Leitrim, Roscommon,’ (S,M,L,R included by Fr. Egan – not in original report)8 Cavan, Fermanagh, Armagh, Meath and Dublin, were agitated to an alarming degree” 9 by the Defenders “a Popish banditti, whose professed object was to deprive the Protestants of their arms.” 10 Later, however,, writing under his own name he states the opposite, that “the gentlemen and landowners in the province of Connaught piqued themselves on the peaceable demeanour, and a respect for the laws, which the lower class of the people there continued to evince, when most other parts of the kingdom were disturbed by

3. State Paper Office 620/7/73, p.8
4. 4. Rosamond Jacob, The Rise of the United Irishmen, p. 99
5. 5. Ibid., pl100
6. Ibid., p.118
7. Curtis, ‘A history of Ireland’ p. 339; Annelecta Hibernica, No. 14, pp.90-91
8. (italics are mine – Rev. Egan). Sligo and Mayo are not included in the Report of the Committee of Secrecy of the Irish House of Commons, August 21, 1798, p.5. There is some evidence of Defender Activity in County Galway
9. ‘A Concise Account of the Material events and Atrocities which occurred in the present Rebellion…..’ by Veridicus, Dublin, 1799, p. 41
10. Ibid., p.39

The United Irishmen.” 11 Their failure to resort to arms he explains away by the remark that the Roman Catholic peasantry of Mayo and Sligo were savage, ignorant and superstitious and though sworn would not have had the spirit to rebel if the French had not arrived. The libel has been repeated by Maxwell in face of the first hand testimony of Stock to the bravery of the Connacht rebels.

No such reason can be assigned for the failure of Connacht to rise with Ulster and Leinster. The rebellion was deliberately provoked in these provinces before the United Irishmen had the opportunity to perfect their organization in the West. “Leinster and Munster had been but partially organized – Connaught not at all.” 12 The official opinion was that “in May 1797, although numbers had been sworn both in Munster and Leinster, the strength of the organization, exclusively of Ulster, lay chiefly in the metropolis and in a few neighbouring counties, namely Dublin, Kildare,Meath, Westmeath and the King’s county (Offaly)” 13 The organization spread in Connacht by way of the northern counties. Maxwell 14 cites the report of the provincial committee at Dungannon, in the Autumn of 1797 to the effect that the United Irish system was gradually progressive then in Mayo and Sligo and that the northern refugees had given a fresh stimulus to the movement, but, until the end of 1797 the system had made very little progress in Connacht.

It was almost two years previously that the events occurred which resulted in this migration into Connacht. Lord Gosford in an address to the magistracy of Armagh, printed in the Dublin Journal, 5th January, 1796, stated that “a persecution, accompanied with all circumstances of ferocious cruelty, is now raging in this country. Neither age, sex, nor even acknowledged innocence can excite mercy. The only crime which the wretched objects are charged with is the profession of the Roman Catholic Faith. A lawless banditti have constituted themselves judge of this new delinquency, and the sentence they pronounce is equally concise and terrible; it is nothing less than confiscation of property and immediate banishment.” 15 At the time “it was generally believe that 7,000 Catholics had been burned or forced out of the county of Armagh, and that the ferocious banditti who had expelled them had been encouraged, connived and protected by the Government.” 16

The refugees from the North were received hospitably. Their reputation for industry and their knowledge of the linen manufacture were inducements to landlords to allow them to settle and several hundred families did so in west Mayo. A colony of Ulster weavers who were settled in Ballina were among the first

11. R.R. Musgrave ‘Memoirs of the Different Rebellions in Ireland,’ Dublin 1801, p.559
12. Thomas Wyse ‘Historical Sketch of the Catholic Association’. 1829, Vol. I, p.132
13. Commons Committee of Secrecy, Report, p.9
14. ‘History of the Irish Rebellion in 1798,’ 1866 Edition, p. 220
15. O’Neill Daunt, ‘Eight Five Years of Irish History’ p. 16
16. Plowden’s quoting ‘History of Ireland,’ Vol. 11, Ibid., p. 377

To respond to the call of arms after the French landing. It was natural that they should have been more advanced in the principles of the United Irishmen than their western neighbours. 17

There was another colony of Ulster families settled in County Galway who had fled from Counties Monaghan and Cavan. Whether their flight was due to the happenings of 1796, to the further ferocities which followed the rebellion in the North in 1798, or to proselytising activities of Lord Farnham 1 in Cavan about 1827, I have not ascertained accurately. It is believed that they came in considerable numbers at an earlier period, but that there was a trickle of migration in the same direction down to the famine of 1847. According to local tradition some of them were evicted by Sam Grey, agent to Lord Farnham. They settled and made homes for themselves, mainly on the barren and unpopulated slopes of the Slieve Aughty mountains in the parish (civil) of Balinakill, now the Catholic parishes of Woodford and Ballinakill, where their descendants are still known locally as ‘Oulthachs’ (Ultach). Some of the surnames are : Clarke, Cleary, Connolly, Daly, Dempsey, Finlay, Jo0rdan, Keon, Logue (Leech), Loughry, MacBride, MacCabe, MacEneany (McEnany), Maguire, Murray, O’Donnell, O’Farrell, O’Reily, Sheridan. 2 The landowner who received them was Thomas Burke of Marblehill, a Catholic Loyalist and magistrate of the county, who was created Baronet in 1797. His father had risen to wealth in the cattle trade during the American War and had purchased this extensive mountain property, 3 part of which was called Ulick’s Mountain and had belonged to the Burkes of Cloncoe. The planting of these Colonists was to the mutual advantage of both parties. The Ulstermen were glad of any place to settle in peace and Sir Thomas who was experimenting with afforestation, road building and the opening up of the barren areas 4 was provided with a tenantry who would reclaim the mountain. If they were there in 1798 they must have remained quiet for the area is not represented in the list (infra) of courtmartial in County Galway between February and July 1799.

During the early part of 1798 the rebellion had taken place in Ulster and Leinster and had been suppressed with barbarity and bloodshed. Its failure was marked on July 17th by the passing in the Irish parliament of an Act of Amnesty, resulting in the general submission of the rebels. All the while Connacht had remained apparently quiet, but the alacrity with which so many from every stratum of the population sprang to arms when Humbert landed at Killala on

17 Maxwell, op. cit,. p.221; Hayes op.cip. p. 32
f see O’Connell, The Schools and Scholars of Breffne, pp.488-503
f I am indebted to Rev. Louis Page, St. Josephs College, Ballinasloe for this list
f Sadleir, ‘The Burkes of Marblehill’ in this jnl, Vol. VIII, p.1
f Hely Dutton, ‘Statistical Survey of the County of Galway (1824, p.440; Hall ‘ A Tour through Ireland,’ (1813) Vol I, p. 319

August 22nd postulates the existence of a widespread organization in the northern counties of the province by that time. The means whereby it was extended there are stated by the Commons Committee of Secrecy: 18 “It appears to your Committee, that the leaders of the treason, apprehensive lest the enemy might be discouraged from any further plan of invasion, by the loyal disposition manifested throughout Munster and Connaught on their former attempt (ie the Hoche expedition to Bantry, December 1796), determined to direct all their exertions to the propagation of the system in those provinces, which had hitherto been but partially infested. With this view emissaries were sent into the south and west in great numbers, of whose success, in forming new societies and administering the oaths of the Union, there were, in the course of a few months, but too evident proofs in the introduction of the same disturbances and enormities into Munster, with which the northern province had been so severely visited.”

The Lords Committee of Secrecy reported that the organization was completed in Ulster on May 10th, 1795, but did not make any considerable progress beyond that province until Autumn, 1796, when emissaries were sent into Leinster. Reports to the provincial committee at Dungannon, 14th September 1797, stated that “Leinster was in a tolerable state of organization, as also Connaught and Munster, and there had been a great number of United Irishmen made, more since the Proclmation.” 19 Howevre, the optimism of this report seems not to have been fully justified in regard to Connacht, particularly in the essential matter of arming the people. Every member of the union who could afford to do so was ordered by the Irish Directory to provide himself with firearms and ammunition, while those who could not were to furnish themselves with pikes. The order was carried out extensively in the provinces of Ulster, Leinster and Munster. In Connacht “the emissaries……..seem not to have been enabled to proceed further…….than by administering oaths to the people; their further progress seems to have been obstructed by the vigorous exertions of the executive government, when rebellion broke forth in open acts of hostility.” 20 Whatever the reason for it, the centre of the province seems to have been dilatory in this respect. As late as August, 1798, when the French had landed, people in Hollymount were seeking information on the making of pikes and between Monivea and Tuam they were idling in ditches and along the roads waiting for news; which does not point to any vigorous reaction in that area to the events that were taking place at Killala. 21 The failure at least to provide firearms could be due in part to the greater poverty of the people in the west. Prompt and vigorous action to prevent arming at this stage

18 Report p.9
19 Ibid., Appendix XIV, p.112. The proclamation referred to was issued on May 17th, offering amnesty to those who would return to allegiance – Musgrave op cit., p.559
20 Lords Committee of Secrecy, Report, p. 10
21 Musgrave, ‘Rebellions’, p.599

was undoubtedly taken. An example can be cited from east Galway in the person of Rev. Power le Poer Trench, rector of Creagh and afterwards Protestant Archbishop of Tuam. As a captain of yeomanry he scoured the country day and night hunting the rebels and made a particular point of confiscating the blacksmiths’ bellows to prevent forging of pikes.22

The United Irish organisation would appear to have been at a less advanced stage in County Galway than in Mayo, when the French landed, but that here too it was gradually progressive is borne out by the numerous courts martial in 1799. The victims of these trials were from every district from east to west of the county with the exception of the southern area. 23 Maxwell assigned as reasons for the Connacht inaction either imperfect organisation or good affection to the government. 24 To these must be added the further causes already mentioned. In County Galway, it is true, there was in addition to the ascendancy group, a large body of loyalist opinion among people of mean of Catholic and native stock. Large numbers who had amassed wealth in trade and other ways were enabled by the partial relaxation of the penal laws to acquire property in land and were aiming at advancement in the social scale. Their energies and outlook were directed primarily towards the aggrandisement of themselves and their families. The most they would wish for was repeal of the laws affecting Catholics. Knowing the temper of the ascendancy, they dreaded any disturbance which might being about a re-enforcement of the penal code. On the other hand, the horrors of the recent revolution in France were vividly before their minds with the consequent fear that they might become the victims of a successful revolution here.

In the southernmost part of the area west of the Shannon, the County Clare, preparedness for insurrection would appear to have been even less. As late as April 27th, 1799, Brigadier General Moore, writing from Athlone stated that “there must be mismanagement of some kind in the Co. of Clare. It is difficult otherwise to account for that miserable little county which till lately had been so quiet being at once so disturbed and continuing so in spite of hanging, banishment etc”. 35 The inference is that here the people were goaded into action by the conduct of the military after the insurrection which had been suppressed further north. Maxwell, in his obnoxious way, reveals the same state of affairs. “A number of inferior criminals were at the tmie (he is referring to what followed September 8, 1798), sacrificed rather to the angry spirit of the times, than to meet the strict ends of justice – and instead of operating beneficially, this unwise severity kept the wilder parts of the mountain districts disquieted for several

22 D’Arcy Sirr, ‘A Memoir of Power le Poer Trench’
23 Document 13, infra
24 Op. cit., p.220
25 S.P.O., 620/7/73, p.27

Seanchas Ardmhaca

Vol. 1, No. 1 1954
An Early Fragment on Saint Patrick in Uí Briúin Breifne.


Rev. Paul Grosjean, …………………………………………………….31
Gwynn, Aubrey Rev:- “”Armagh and Louth in the Twelfth century””, p.1
Johnston Robb, Colin:- “”Astronomy in Armagh””, p.65
Ó Fachtna, Pádraig:- “”Dunleer through the Ages””, p.151
Ó Fiaich, Tómas:- “”An t-Ath Lorcán Ó Muireadhaigh Staraí””, p.45
Tohall, Patrick:- “”Patrick James O’Byrne, Dean of Armagh (1810-1819) and the Contemporary Scene””, p.24
Glancy, Michael:- “”The Church Lands of Co. Armagh””, p. 67 (Document)
Mooney, Canice Fr.:- “”The Franciscan Third order Friary at Dungannon””, p.12
Ó Ceallaigh, Séamus Dr.:- “”The Northern Boundary of the Archdiocese of Armagh””, p.56
MacEvoy, Brendan Rev.:-“”The Parish of Errigal Kieran in the Nineteenth Century””, p.118 (Local History)
Paterson, T.G.:- “”The Territory of Ballymacone and its associations with the McCones””, pp.132-150 (Local History)
M.S. Material for Dioscescan and Parochial History: Report on Collection of Sources. 1. The Library of the Representative Church Body Dublin. pp. 202-

Vol. 1, No. 2 1955
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn At t-Ath:- “”Bhí Naomh Pádraig Anseo”” p.11
Gwynn, Aubrey Rev.:- “”Armagh and Louth in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries””, p.17
Mag Uidir, Seosamh An t-Ath:- “”Danta fa Chleir Ardmhaca A Rí lér fuascladh”” p.161
de Ris, Sean: – “”Danta fa Chleir Ardmhaca:- Targaire dhéarscnaidh””, p.164 (Document)
Hughes, Felix J.:- “”Eamhain Macha””, p.1
Murray Patrick Rev.:- “”Missionary Priests of All Hallows College, Dublin from the Archdiocese of Armagh”” 1842-75, p.94
Paterson, T.G.:- “”Old St. Malachy’s””, pp.169-191 (Local History)
Mooney, Canice Fr.:- “”The Franciscan First Order Friary at Dungannon””, p.72
Glancy, Michael:- “”The Incidence of the Plantation on the City of Armagh””, pp.115-160 (Document)
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”The Son of Sir Phelim O’Neill””, p.38 Roe, Helen M.: – “”The High Crosses of Co. Armagh””, p. 107 (Photographic Survey)

Vol. 2, No. 1 1956
Anon:- “”A Thirteenth Century Poem on Armagh Cathedral””, p.145
Mooney, Canice Fr.:- “”Accusations against Oliver Plunkett””, p.119
Jennings, Brendan Rev.:- “”An Appeal to the Ulster Franciscans””, p.114
Mac Dermott, Michael Rev:- “”An Old Parish Name in Armagh””, p.163
Glancy, Michael:- Armagh – “”A Surmise””, ‘Notes & Queries’ p.78
Muireadhaigh, Lorcán, An t-Ath:- “”Danta fa Chleir Ardmhaca: ‘Silbheastar Ó Coinne'””, p.141
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn At t-Ath:- “”Domhnach Mór””, p.166
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn At t-Ath:- “”Forgers All?”” St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p.1
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”From Creggan to Louvain””, p.90
Coyle, Michael:- “”Holy Wells in the Parish of Dunleer””, p.192
Mooney, Bernard J., Rev.:- “”Magh and Chairn””, p.206
Ó Raifeartaigh, Tarlach:- “”Muinteoiri Naisiunta agus an “”Dlisteanas”” 1831-70″”, St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p. 61
Ó Raifeartaigh, Tarlach:- “”Na Teoirici Nua”” St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p.9
Mac Dermott, Michael Rev.:- “”Professor Carney’s Arguments”” St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p.27
Bierler, Ludwig:- “”St. Secundinus and Armagh””, St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p.21
Mac Airt, Seán:- “”The Chronology of St. Patrick””. St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p.4
McGarvey, Charles Rev.:- “”The Heather Edge””, p.178
Milett, Benignus O.F.M:- . “”The Pastoral Zeal of Robert Wauchope””. St. Patrick and Armagh – A Symposium, p.32
Ó Mearáin, Lorcán, an t-Ath:- The Ulster Forces in 1595

Vol. 2, No. 2 1957

Ó Mórdha, Séamus P.:- “”Arthur Bennett’s Correspondance with Robert S. Mac Adam””, p.360
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”Danta fa Chleir Ardmhaca: ‘Pádraig Ó Donghaile'””, p.323
McDermott, Michael Rev.:- “”Domhnach Airthir Maighe””, p.433
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn At t-Ath: “”Domhnach Mór””, p.418
Mooney, Canice Fr.:- “”Father Francis Magruairk O.F.M””,. p. 229
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”Laimhscribhinn Ó Chuige Uladh i Chicago””, p.262
Paterson, T.G.:- “”The Armagh Manor Court Rolls””, p.295
Glancy, Michael:- “”The Church Lands of Armagh””, p.327
Mac Ivor, Dermot, Rev.:- “”The Church of Kildemock””, p.390
Mac Phóil, Donnchadh An t-Ath:- “”The Clergy of Blessed Oliver Plunkett””, p.253
Fr. Columcille, O.C.R.:- “”The Irish Cistercian Documents in Octavian’s Register, Armagh””, p.269
M. Ó C.:- “”Will and Codicils of Primate Richard O’Reilly””, p.356

Vol. 3, No. 1 1958
O’Kane, Louis Rev.:- “”A Statistical Return of Armagh Diocese in 1836″”, p.181
Milett, Benignus O.F.M.:- “”Ancient Altar Plate and other Furnishings of the Church of Armagh””, p.87
Mac Niocaill, Gearóid:- “”Caipeisi Domniceanacha ón 17ú cead””, p.143
Paterson, T.G.:- “”County Armagh Householders 1664-1665″”, p.96
De Ris, Seán:- “”Danta fa Chleir Ardmhaca: ‘An Dá Sheán;”” p.178
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn At t-Ath:- “”Domhnach Mór: The Plantation Era””, p.190
Ó Mórdha, Séamus P.:- “”Robert S. McAdam’s Louth Correspondents, 1831-1845″”, p.155
Mac Phóil, Donnchadh An t-Ath:- “”The Clergy of Blessed Oliver Plunkett””, p.8
Tohall, Patrick:- “”The Diamond Fight of 1795 and the Resultant Expulsions””, p.17
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn An t-Ath:- “”The Donaghmore Franciscans””, p.1
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”The Fall and Return of John Mac Moyer””, p.51
Anon:- “”The Story of Mellifont Reviews””, p.248

Vol. 3, No. 2 1959
Anon:- “”A Tour through the Archdiocese (Armagh) in 1810″”, pp.388, 429, 440, 446
Mac Niocaill, Gearóid:- “”Annala Gearra as Oibhinse Ard Mhaca””, p.337
Mac Phóil, Donnchadh An t-Ath:- “”Blessed Oliver Plunkett and the Tories””, p.251
Anon:- “”Blessed Oliver’s Ordinations to Diaconate and Priesthood”” ‘Notes & Queries’, p.441
Regan, Joseph P., Rev.:- “”Church Building at Beleek””, p.430
MacIvor, Dermot Rev.:- “”County Louth Churches and Church Lands in Primate Swayne’s Register””, p.369
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”Danta fa Chleir Ardmhaca: VI. An t-Ath ‘Feidhlim Ó hAnluain'””, p.380
Leclercq, Dom Jean:- “”Documents on the Cult of St. Malachy””, p.318
Ó Doibhlinn, Éamonn At t-Ath:- “”Domhnach Mór: The Insurrection of 1641 and its background””, p.401
Paterson, T.G.:- “”Lough Rorkan and the O’Lorkans””, p.261
Moran, Anne:- “”New Light on the Family of Blessed Oliver Plunkett””, p.385
Registrum Diocesis Dublinensis Reviews
Brady, John Rev.:- “”Some Inquisitions relating to Louth Clergy during the Reign of Henry III””, p.333
Ó Fiaich, Tómas An t-Ath:- “”Some Letters of Newman to Archbishop Dixon of Armagh””, p.389
O’Kane, Louis Rev.:- “”The Battle of Clonoe and other Sectarian Troubles””, p.315
Glancy, Michael:- “”The Churchlands of Armagh, No. 2″”, p.341
Mac Phóil, Donnchadh An t-Ath:- “”The Clergy of Blessed Oliver Plunkett (Part III)””, p.268
The Diamond and the Flight, Addendum: “”Tartaraghan Mass Garden”” ‘Notes & Queries’, p.441
McEvoy, Brendan Rev.:- “”The United Irishmen in Co. Tyrone (Part I)””, p.283

The Historical Record, Co. Dublin

CONTENTS
March, 1938


The Beginnings of Municipal Government in Dublin.
R. Dudley Edwards., D. Litt………………………………………………………………2
Vagabonds and Sturdy Beggars. Part I – Poverty, Pigs and Pestilence in
Medieval Dublin.
Thomas King Moylan……………………………………………………………………..11
Dublin’s First Railway. Part I – From Inception to Opening.
Kevin Murray……………………………………………………………………………….19

Notes and Queries
Some Place-names in and around Dublin. Henry Morris, M.A………………………27
The Assembly House, Sth. William Street. P.M. and F.O’K…………………………28

CONTENTS.
September, 1938.

Vagabonds and Sturdy Beggars. Part 111.Dublin’s Debt to the House of Industry
Thomas King Moylan……………………………………………………………………..65-74
Dublin Slang Songs, with Music. Donal O’Sullivan…………………………………….75

Reviews: Author’s Surname given and then the title of the book reviewed
Irish Historical Studies ……………………………………………………………………94
Elines, Engraved Irish Portraits…………………………………………………………..95
Sadleir, Dublin University Magazine……………………………………………………..95

Queries:
Mulhuddart. Alexander L Rorke……………………………………………………………96

CONTENTS
March 1939

The Case for a Dublin Museum. L.S. Gógan……………………………………………..97
Early History of the Grand Canal. Henry Phillips………………………………………108
Hidden and Vanishing Dublin. Part II – Fenian Dublin, 1865-67
P.J. Stephenson…………………………………………………………………………….120
Notes and Queries:
John Roque on Dublin and Dubliners, 1756. F.O’K…………………………………….127

CONTENTS
September 1939
In the Shadow of Christ Church. P.J. McCall……………………………………………….1
Hungry Hamilton, Fellow of Trinity. George A. Little…………………………………….7
The Battle of Rathmines. H.O. Brunskill………………………………………………….18
Statues on Public Buildings in Dublin. Mrs. A.M. Frazer………………………………..30
The Church and Parish of Kilternan. Kevin Nolan………………………………………..38

Editorial Note………………………………………………………………………………….40

CONTENTS
December, 1939

Some Old Street Characters of Dublin. Robert Gahan…………………………………..41
Religious Life in Old Dublin. Rev. Myles V. Ronan………………………………………46
Some Rentals of the Earl of Shelburne’s Estates, 1775-1776.
Thomas Kelly………………………………………………………………………………….55
The Dodder Valley. James Hegarty………………………………………………………..59
In the Shadow of Christ Church. P.J. McCall……………………………………………..73

Obituary:
H. O. Brunskill, I880-1938………………………………………………………………….96

CONTENTS
March, 1940

Dublin Castle in the Seventeenth Century. James L.J. Hughes………………………81
Some Old Street Characters of Dublin – Part. II.
Robert Gahan………………………………………………………………………………..98
Religious Life in Old Dublin – Part II
Rev. Myles V. Ronan……………………………………………………………………….106
In the Shadown of Christ Church – Part III.
P.J. McCall……………………………………………………………………………………112
Proceedings of the Old Dublin Society…………………………………………………..117
Notes and Queries:
Lesser known Documents in the City Muniment Room of Dublin……………………119

CONTENTS
June-August, 1940

The Antiquities and Place Names of South County Dublin.
Liam Price…………………………………………………………………………………….121
The Dublin Family of Jacob. W.J. Jacob………………………………………………….134
Two Memorable Dublin Houses. Rev. John P. Campbell, C.M…………………………141
Proceedings of the Old Dublin Society……………………………………………………156
Notes and Queries
Mulhuddart. Rev. Myles V. Ronan………………………………………………………….158

CONTENTS
September-November, 1940

St. Michan’s Parish in the Eighteenth Century. Canon E.J. Young, M.A., B.D………………………………………………………………….1
Papers of Bryan Bolger, 1792-1834. Alderman Thomas Kelly, T.D……………………..8
Little Rivers of Dublin. Miss Lily M. O’Brennan……………………………………………19
Old Moore’s Almanack. B.P. Bowen, B.L., B. Sc…………………………………………..26
Proceedings of the Old Dublin Society……………………………………………………..38
Notes and Queries…………………………………………………………………………….39

CONTENTS
March-May, 1941

Joseph Damer, A Banker of Old Dublin.
Mrs. A.M. Frazer, L.L.C.M…………………………………………………………………….41
“Mr. Lovitt out of Iorland”.
Rt. Rev. E. Neville Lovett, C.B.E., D.D., Bishop of Salisbury…………………………. 54
Main Street, Dublin. James L. J. Hughes………………………………………………… 67

Notes and Queries…………………………………………………………………………..78

Obituary
Albert A. Le Bas, 1869-1941……………………………………………………………… 80

CONTENTS
June-August, 1941

The Mysterious Origin of Dean Swift. Denis Johnston, B.L……………………………81
Mountjoy Square. F.A. Ashe……………………………………………………………….98
Notes and Queries
Benjamin Disraell. Bernard Shillman…………………………………………………….116
The Domvile Papers………………………………………………………………………..118
Preservation of Historical Documents……………………………………………………119
St. Patrick’s Cathedral. H.T. O’Rourke……………………………………………………120
Editorial Note……………………………………………………………………………….120

CONTENTS
VoL. IV.
1941-1942

Pallace Row

Alderman Thomas Kelly, T.D……………………………………………………………….1
Town Major Henry Charles Sirr
Joseph W. Hammond……………………………………………………………………14, 58
Glimpses of Old Dalkey. F.M. O’Flanagan………………………………………………..41
The Dublin Penny Post, 1773-1840. Dr. J. Stafford Johnson…………………………..81
Norse Dublin. Edmund Curtis, M.A., D.Litt……………………………………………….96
Malachi Horan Remembers. Dr. George Little………………………………………..109, 121
St. Stephen’s Hospital. Rev. Myles V. Ronan, P.P., D. Litt., M.R.I.A……………….141
Pharmacy in Old Dublin. James J. Kerr. M.P.S.I………………………………………..149

Notes and Queries
The Armorials of the City of Dublin. Val Jackson, M.I.C.E.I…………………………….33
The Irish Parliament House. K.M……………………………………………………………38
Francesco Geminiani
Culture Bulletin, Italian Legation……………………………………………………………76
The Site of Isolde’s Tower. K.M……………………………………………………………..79
Waste Paper……………………………………………………………………………………………160
Proceedings of the Old Dublin Society………………………………………………………39
Editorial Note………………………………………………………………………………….160

CONTENTS
Vol. V
1942-1943

The Antient Concert Rooms. Patrick J. Stephenson……………………………………….1
Old Alms Houses of Dublin. Robert Gahan………………………………………………15-40
George’s Quay and Rogerson’s Quay in the Eighteenth Century.
J.W. Hammond…………………………………………………………………………………41
David Digues La Touche, Banker.
Mrs. A. M. Fraser, L.L.C.M……………………………………………………………………55
A Scribe of the Liberties – John McCall.
B. P. Bowen, B.L………………………………………………………………………………81
Charity Children in 18th century Dublin..
Professor Mary Hayden, M.A. D. Litt……………………………………………………….92
The Athomospheric Railway to Dalkey. Kevin Murray………………………………….108
St. Patrick’s Staff and Christ Church.
Rev. Myles V. Ronan, P.P., D. Litt., M.R.I.A……………………………………………..121
Early Dublin Public Lighting. Patrick Meehan…………………………………………….130
Sir Robert Kane. J. J. Kerr, P.C., M.P.S.I………………………………………………….137

Notes and Queries
A Link with Robert Emmet. Dr. George A. Little…………………………………………..69
A Brass Stamp or Seal. Dr. George A. Little……………………………………………….72
The Bridge Oge. Rev. M.V. Ronan., P.P., D. Litt., M.R.I.A……………………………… 73
Tobar Moling and Templeoge.
Rev. M.V. Ronan., P.P., D. Litt., M.R.I.A…………………………………………………….73
A Slaughter House of Nuisance of 1723. Rev. Canon E. J. Young, B.D…………………75
Old Dublin in the London Gazette. Patrick O’Connor…………………………………….147
Townsend Street Chapel.
Rev. M.V. Ronan., P.P., D. Litt., M.R.I.A…………………………………………………..156
Robert Emmet and Michael Dwyer
Rev. M.V. Ronan., P.P., D. Litt., M.R.I.A…………………………………………………..157
Notes on Changes in Old Dublin……………………………………………………………158

CONTENTS
Vol. VI
1942-1943

Christmas in Old Dublin. Miss A. M. P. Smithson…………………………………………..1
A Glimpse at Victorian Dublin. F.J. Little, B.A………………………………………………8
Mr. William Cope’s Petition, 1804. J.W. Hammond……………………………………….25
Dublin and the Four Masters.
B. Mac Giolla Phadraig, M.A……………………………………………………………………41
Old Bells of Dublin. Mrs. A. M. Fraser, L.L.C.M……………………………………………..50
The Medieval Parish of St. Stephen. F.P. Carey…………………………………………… 63
William Penn in Dublin. Miss Eila Buckley……………………………………………………81
Behind the Scenes of the Emmet Insurrection.
J.W. Hammond……………………………………………………………………………………91
Kingsbridge Terminus. Wm. J. Jacob………………………………………………………..107
Thomas Pleasants, 1729-1818. Miss Beatrice Bayley Butler…………………………….121
Dublin Opticians and Instrument Makers. Thos. H. Mason, M.R.I.A……………………133

Notes and Queries
Military precautions in Dublin, 1803. Patrick O’Connor……………………………………..39
Derivation of the Name of Ringsend. F.S. Bourke……………………………………………39
Derivation of the Name of Ringsend. Geo. A. Little…………………………………………62
Mulberry Planting in Dublin. P.J. Cahill, T.C., P.C…………………………………………….62
The Carbery. Professor Edmund Curtis…………………………………………………………73
The Old Tuam Society. Dr. T. B Costello, M.R.I.A……………………………………………74
A Forgotten irish Artist. Geo. A. Little…………………………………………………………75
Debtors in Dublin Prisons, 1730-1. Patrick O’Connor……………………………………75, 157
John Burke’s Recollections. Miss K. Hart……………………………………………………..150
Notes on Some Recent papers. J.W. Hammond……………………………………………..153

The Historical Society, Dun Laoghaire Borough

CONTENTS
Journal No. 4
1995


Annals of Dun Leary-Kingstown.
Michael McCovern………………..3

Before the Bulldozer Came
Eamonn Gunn ………………..6

Dun Laoghaire by Fanlight
Mary Grogan………………..10

Bricks & Stones may …
Frank Long………………..15

The Centenary – A Flick in Time –
Gerard McCovern………………..18

Kish Bank Disaster – 1st September 1875 –
Philip Lecane………………..21

The Mini-Dwellings of Monkstown & Kingstown
Dr Jim Gowan………………..25

G. A. Stevens & Son Ltd.
Colin Scudds………………..29

A Costly Experience
Alice Cullen………………..34

The 1914 Kingstown Municipal Nationalist Victory
James Scannell………………..36

The Kingstown Monthly 1894 – Davy’s Kolum – / Davy Stephens
Mona O’Donnell………………..42

Lower Glenageary Road to the Cross Road with Eden Road and

Corrig Road 1830-1992
Eleanor Ticher………………..52

The Chaplain in the War Trenches – In Memoriam, Fr Willie Doyle S. J.
Tony Quinn………………..56

Killiney Ancient Church
Alice Cullen………………..59

CONTENTS
Journal No. 5
1996

The Dun Laoghaire Mail Boat
Tony Quinn………………..3

Sophia Violet Barrett
Philip Lecane………………..4

Firemarks
Dominic Dowling………………..9

Frankie Blowers………………..16

The Street Where We Live – Corrig Avenue
Eamonn Gunn………………..18

Dr Rumley & The Kingstown Cholera 1832
Dr John B. Kearns………………..23

The “Bug” House
Gerard McGovern………………..36

Olivia Taaffe, 7 Eblana Terrace, Kingstown
Brian Clarke………………..40

Salthill

Colin & Anna Scudds………………..44

A Holiday Brochure of Dunleary Long Ago
Kevin Murray………………..49

Centenary of the Palme – Lifeboat Disaster
Seamus O’Conrzor………………..53

The City of Glendalough
Harry Long………………..54

Dun Laoghaire – Prelude to “The Emergency”
James Scannell………………..58

Glencullen, Fraochan Berries and Dan O’Connell
Tim Doyle………………..66

A Tribute to Joe English………………..69

CONTENTS
Journal No. 6
1997

Rathdown………………..2

Reflections 1996 to 1932
Tony Quinn………………..7

The Kingstown Lying-In Hospital (1842-1871)
John Fleetwood………………..8

Findlater Street, Glasthule
Paula Banim………………..15

Dun Laoghaire – Prelude to “The Emergency”
James Scannell………………..16

Steamers Suggested
Kevin Murray………………..27

Tel-El-Kebir Dairy
Michael McGovern………………..29

Corrig Castle & Demesne
Colin Scudds………………..34

The Rise and Fall of the DuBedats of Dublin
Maria Clancy………………..41

Disappearing Dun Laoghaire
Colin Scudds………………..58

Windsor, Monkstown
Philip Lecane………………..61

CONTENTS
Journal No. 7
1998

The Sullivans
Tony Quinn………………..3

The Old Lamplighter
Frank Flanagan………………..8

The Kingstown Steamer
Freda Agnew………………..15

Disappearing Dun Laoghaire
Colin Scudds………………..18

The Story of Friarsland
Dr John Kearns………………..23

Letter to Daniel O’Connell
Contributed by Brian Smith………………..39

I Remember Sallynoggin
Patricia Hennessy-Williams………………..41

Dun Laoghaire – Prelude to the Emergency
James Scannell………………..45

The People’s Park
Colin Scudds………………..52

The Duel between Daniel O’Connell and John D’Esterre
Tom Doyle………………..59

The Astoria Cinema, Glasthule
Michael McGovern………………..64

Dungar Terrace
Freda Agnew………………..66

Marconi
Séamus O’Connor………………..67

The Irish Ancestor

Vol. 1, No. 1, 1969


Christian names in Ireland
de Breffny, Brian

Entries from the Randall Family Bible

Finucane of Co. Clare
Mott, George F.

Household Stuff
ffolliott, Rosemary

Administrations from the peculiar of Newry & Mourne

ffolliott of Co. Meath
ffolliott, Rosemary

Mallow Testamentary Records

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
Darwin, Kenneth

The Value of Tombstone Inscriptions
Clarke, R.S. J. Dr.

CONTENTS
Vol. 1, No. 2, 1969

An 18th Century Abduction. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………69

Entries from the Rev. Alexander Neilson’s Family Bible………………………76

Crone of Co. Cork. Brian de Breffny………………………………………………77

Wills of irish Interest at Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1749-1847
Terrence Punch………………………………………………………………………89

A Record of Presbyterians in Co. Antrim. Patrick Smythe-Wood…………….95

Some Irish Monumental Inscriptions in England.
Horace E. Jones……………………………………………………………………..97

The Journal of the Rev. Adam Averell. Mary Ross Brown…………………..103

Some irish Militia Movements during the Early Napoleonic Wars.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………109

The Family of Odell or O’Dell. Brian de Breffny………………………………114

Finucane of Co. Clare: Addenda and Corrigenda…………………………….144

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………145

CONTENTS
Vol. II, No. 1, 1970

An unknown Miniature of Mrs. Jordan.
Usher A. F. Williamson……………………………………………………………….1

Pons to Punch. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………….2

Children’s Clothes, 1679-1867. Rosemary ffolliott……………………………..19

Entries from the Family Bible of James Hyde of Longford…………………….23

The Oldest Registers of Ballingarry, Co. Limerick……………………………..24

The Dexters of Dublin and Annfield, Co. Kildare.
Patrick Montague-Smith…………………………………………………………….31

The Furnishings of an 18th Century Inn…………………………………………43

Irish Nominees in the State Tontines of 1773, 1775 and 1777.
Francis Leeson………………………………………………………………………47

Some Connecting Links between Ireland and the New World from Old
Newspapers. Rosemary ffoliott…………………………………………………..62

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………70

CONTENTS
Vol. II, No. 2, 1970

Ambrose O’Higgins: An enquiry into his Origins and Ancestry.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………….81

Vicars. The Hon. Guy Strutt………………………………………………………90

Spread of Co. Cork. Brian de Breffny………………………………………….102

“An Irishman’s House and his Church”
Elizabeth Fitzpatrick……………………………………………………………..112

Entries from the McDermott and Rees Family Bible…………………………114

The Estate of Archibald Hutchinson of the Middle Temple, Esq.
Patrick Smythe-Wood……………………………………………………………115

Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………..117

Entrance gates. Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………128

Inscriptions from the Parish Churchyard of Culfeightrin, Co. Antrim.
Patrick and Elizabeth Smythe-Wood………………………………………….131

Pons to Punch, Addenda and Corrigenda…………………………………….136

CONTENTS
Vol. III, No. 1, 1971

Peg Plunket, Lady of Pleasure. Francis Leeson………………………………….1

Some Irish Inscriptions in Old Burial Grounds of New South

Wales, Australia. Keith A. Johnson……………………………………………….5

The Breretons of Carrigslaney, Co. Carlow and New Abbey, Co. Kildare.
Patrick Montague-Smith……………………………………………………………10

Abstracts of Some Hamilton Wills………………………………………………..27

Blaney of Lurgan, Co. Armagh.
Roger Blaney…………………………………………………………………………33

A List of Catholic Merchants in Cork City in 1762………………………………39

The Family of Odell or O’Dell: Supplement.
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………..41

Some lesser Known Country Houses in Munster and Leinster.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………..49

Entries from the Bible of Mrs. Robert Gordon…………………………………..51

Quaker Inventories. Olive C. Goodbody………………………………………….52

Crone of Cork: Addenda and Corrigenda…………………………………………62

Spread of Cork: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………………………..63

Dexter of Annfield: Addenda and Corrigenda……………………………………63

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………….64

CONTENTS
Vol. III, No. 2, 1971

Robert Fagan, Artist. Brian de Breffny……………………………………………..71

Old Parochial Registers of Scotland: References to Parties from Ireland
Donald Whyte………………………………………………………………………….79

The International Genealogical Directory. Francis Leeson……………………..83

Entries from George Keane Johnston’s Family Bible…………………………….84

Women’s Dress in Ireland, 1680-1880. Rosemary ffolliott…………………….85

Brewster of Co. Kerry. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………..90

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………….92

The Charm of Irish Gate Cottages. Rosemary ffolliott………………………..102

Births, Marriages and Deaths from the Journal of the Rev. Adam Averall.
Mary Ross Brown…………………………………………………………………….105

Eight Emigrant Irishmen. Terrence M. Punch……………………………………107

The Earlies Church of Ireland Parish Registers of Whitechurch, Diocese of
Ferns…………………………………………………………………………………..121

The Irish Society for Archives. Brian de Breffny………………………………..123

The Breretons of Carrigslaney, Co. Carlow and New Abbey, Co. Kildare.
Addenda and Corrigenda……………………………………………………………124

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………125

CONTENTS
Vol. IV, No. 1, 1972

The American Sailor who Succeeded to an Irish Peerage.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………………1

Irishmen in Scottish Census Records. David C. Cargill……………………………8

Monckton of Co. Limerick. Brian de Breffny………………………………………..15

John Galvin’s Copybook……………………………………………………………….21

Tombstones of some irish Emigrants in the Catholic Cemetery at Andover.
Paul Martin Doherty……………………………………………………………………23

Hillas of Co. Sligo. Celeste Byrne……………………………………………………26

Cottages and Farmhouses. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………….30

Arthur Kingstone’s Household Stuff. N.W. English……………………………….35

The Debtors of Daniel Croghan, Ennis, Co. Clare, 1735…………………………43

Abstracts of Wills……………………………………………………………………..45

Reviews…………………………………………………………………………………52

CONTENTS
Vol, IV, No. 2, 1972

A Wexford Lady and her Daughters on the Continent.
Phillipa Torlonia di Civitella Cesi…………………………………………………..59

Entries from James Francis Plunkett’s Family Bible……………………………..70

Scanlan of the Barony of Upper Connello, Co. Limerick
Brian de Breffny & Alicia E. Evers………………………………………………….71

Shall these Bones Live? Rosemary ffoliott……………………………………….81

Australian Immigration, with Special Reference to the Irish Migrant.
Marjorie J. Morgan………………………………………………..83

A Note on John Skerry, a Kilkenny Emigrant to Canada
Terence Punch………………………………………………..86

Men’s Clothes in Ireland, 1660-1850.
Rosemary ffolliott………………………………………………..81

Speranza’s Ancestry – Elgee, the Maternal Lineage of Oscar Wilde
Brian de Breffny………………………………………………..94

William Collin’s Inventory, 1750………………………………………………..104

Monumental Inscriptions from Mount Temple Churchyard,
Co. Westmeath. Liam Cox………………………………………………..105

Eight Emigrant Irishmen: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………………………………..112

Reviews………………………………………………..113

CONTENTS
Vol. V, No. 1, 1973

The Descendants of Robert McCann of Cloghoge, Co. Armagh.
Guy Strutt……………………………………………………………………………..1

Eating and Drinking Habits in Ireland Two hundred Years Ago.
George Mott…………………………………………………………………………..7

Father bernard’s Register and the irish Militia in Essex.
Patrick Quinlivan……………………………………………………………………12

Some Country Houses near Athlone. N.W. English……………………………17

Notices of Irish-Born Persons in New York City Newspapers.
B. Ann Moorhouse………………………………………………………………….24

Entries from Sampson Cox’s Family Bible………………………………………27

Monumental Inscriptions at Whitechurch, Co. Waterford……………………28

Provincial Town Life in Munster. Rosemary ffolliot……………………………34

Early 19th century Lists of Protestant Parishoners in the
Diocese of Meath.Rev. C.C.Ellison……………………………………………….37

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………..53

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………63

CONTENTS
Vol. V., No. 2, 1973

The Vereker Family. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………69

Some Irish Inscriptions in an Old Burial Ground at Sydney,
New South Wales, Australia. Keith A. Johnson…………………………….76

Entries from the Lyons Family Prayerbook…………………………………..83

Heraldic or Ornamental Animal Figures in Ireland. Rosemary ffolliott….84

A Mystery Bible Sheet. Thomas G. Bennett…………………………………87

Old Parochial Registers of Scotland: References to Parties from
Ireland. Donald Whyte…………………………………………………………88

The Paternal Ancestry of Oscar Wilde. Brian de Breffny………………….96

Abstracts of Some Skerrett Wills……………………………………………100

The Contents of Burton Hall, Co. Cork, in 1686.
Rosemary ffolliott and Brian de Breffny……………………………………104

Early 19th century Lists of Protestant Parishoners in the
Dioceses of Meath.Rev. C.C. Ellison………………………………………..113

Speranza’s Ancestry – Elgee, the Maternal Lineage of
Oscar Wilde – Corrigenda……………………………………………………..127

Reviews………………………………………………………………………….127

CONTENTS
Vol. VI, No. 1, 1974

Bevan of Limerick. Brian de Breffny………………………………………………1

Employees of the irish Revenue in 1709. Brian de breffny……………………6

Houses in Ireland in the 17th Century. Rosemary ffolliott………………….16

Irish Entries in the 1851 Census Returns of St. Mary’s, Northgate,
Canterbury,Kent. D.W. Harrington and C.J. Perry……………………………..22

Records if Irish Emigrants to Canada in Sussex Archives, 1839-1847
Francis Leeson………………………………………………………………………31

The Journal of an Irish Emigrant to Canada. Donal Begley………………….43

Entries from the Family Bible of Joshua Porter Conway……………………..48

Lost periods. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………49

Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………….53

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..64

CONTENTS
Vol. VI, No. 2, 1974

The Family of Tuke. David R.M. Tuke…………………………………………..67

Entries from the Family Bible of John Smith of Dorset St., Dublin………..73

Collectors of the Revenue in Ireland, Michaelmas, 1678…………………..73
James Holme’s Family Notebook……………………………………………….74

Some Lost Country Houses near Athlone. N.W. English……………………79

Tombstones in Moy Graveyard, near Summerhill, Co. Meath.
Beryl Moore and Josephine Maguire…………………………………………..85

Some newspaper References to irish Immigrants in Oneda Co.
New York. Marilla Grimes………………………………………………………..97

The Surprising Newspapers of Ennis. Rosemary ffolliott……………………98

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1801-1817.
Terence M. Punch…………………………………………………………………101

Abstracts of some Ardagh, Clogher and Kilmore Diocesan Wills………….112

Reviews…………………………………………………………………………….121

CONTENTS
Vol. VII, No. 1, 1975

Letters from Home. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………….1

The Irish Passengers Aboard the ‘New World’, Liverpool-New York,
October-December, 1853………………………………………………………….6

Gray of Cork City and Lehana.
Richard Clarke and Charles Dowman…………………………………………..11

Magistrates of Co. Clare in 1792……………………………………………….14

The Swift Rise and Slow Decline of Frederick Buck
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………15

Entries from the family Bible of William Yeates of Haystown,
Co. Dublin………………………………………………………………………….24

Monumental Inscriptions from the Church and Graveyard at
Kilmacduagh, (Gort), Co. Galway. Brian J. Cantwell…………………………26

Constabulary employed in the District of Moate, Co. Westmeath.
Liam Cox……………………………………………………………………………35

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1818-1825.
Terrence M. Punch…………………………………………………………………39

Index to Killala and Achonry Administration Bonds………………………….55

CONTENTS
Vol. VII, No. 2, 1975

Abstracts of Wills

Extracts from Michael Murphys Commonplace Book
Strutt, Guy : The Hon.

Houses in Provincial Towns
Ffolliott, Rosemary

Magistrates in Co. Clare in 1837
De Breffney, Brian

Margaret Gallagher’s Notebook
Robinson, K.J. Rev.

Memorials from Rathmore, Co. Meath
Moore, B.F. & Cawkhill, Mr. & Mrs.

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia 1826-1830
Punch, Terence M.

CONTENTS
Vol. VIII, No. 1, 1976

Entries from Elizabeth Mettrick’s Family Bible
Mrs. Pounden’s Experiences during the 1798 Rising in Co. Wexford.
Simon L. M. de Montfort…………………………………………………………….4

The Graveyard and Tombstones at Moyagher, Co. Meath.
Beryl F. E. Moore and Mr. and Mrs. John Cawkhill…………………………….9-12

Silver in Dublin. Douglas Bennett………………………………………………..13

Magistrates of Co. Clare in 1819…………………………………………………16

How Waterford City voted in 1807. H. F. Morris …………………………….18-32

lrish Deserters at Halifax, Nova Scotia, during the Napoleonic Wars.
Terrence M. Punch ……………………………………………………………….33-35

Some Game Licences of 1802. Rosemary ffolliott…………………………..35-38

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………4?

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1831-1834.
Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………………………….53

CONTENTS
Vol. VIII, No. 2, 1976

Setting Up House – 1825 Style.
Rev. C.C. Ellison……………………………………………………………………75

The Leading Catholics of Waterford in 1792…………………………………..80

The Passengers on the “Polly”. Terrence M. Punch……………………………82

Game Licences in North-West Ulster in 1802………………………………….84

Robert Craige’s Co. Cavan Tenants, 1703-4.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………….86

Entries from the Family Bible of John Davidson of Co. Down……………….88

The Changing Gardens of Ireland. Rosemary ffolliott………………………..88

Tombstones in Balsoon Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F.E. Moore and Mr. & Mrs. Cawkhill………………………………….94

Agnes Townsend’s Notebook…………………………………………………….96

The 1821 Census Returns for the Parishes of Aglish and
Portnascully, Co. Kilkenny………………………………………………………113

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia, 1834-1840.
Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………………………..124

CONTENTS
1977 ,Vol. IX, No. 1

Entries from the Family Bible of Alexander and Esther Crookshank………….1

Tombstone Inscriptions at Ardcanny,.Co. Limerick.
M. J Dore ………………………………………………………………………………3

Co. Cork Game Certificates, 1802………………………………………………….5

A Moorhouse Family of Dublin, Carlow and Kildare.
B-Ann Moorhouse……………………………………………………………………15

Irishmen in Scottish Census Records
David C. Cargill………………………………………………………………………19

Going of Munster. Rev. C. C. Ellison……………………………………………..21

The 1841 Census Return for Two Townlands in Aglish Parish,
Co. Kilkenny…………………………………………………………………………44

The Cochran Estate. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………..48

Bickerstaff of Glenavy Parish, Co. Antrim.
Brian de Breffny…………………………………………………………………….50

Abstracts of some Boyd Wills…………………………………………………….53

Agnes Townsend’s Notebook: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………56

Elizabeth Mettrick’s Family Bible: Corrigenda………………………………….56

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………56

CONTENTS
Vol. IX, No. 2, 1977

Roundwood and the Sharps. Brian de Breffny…………………………………..59

Entries from William and Elizabeth MacDougall’s Family Bible……………….68

Extracts from the Vestry Book and Parish Registers of Kilbeggan,
Co. Westmeath………………………………………………………………………70

The Wonderful Carving on irish Baroque Side-Tables.
Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………………………………74

Protestant Householders in the Parishes of Croagh, Nantinan, Rathkeale
And Kilscannell, Co. Limerick in 1766…………………………………………….77

Irish Ancestors in the “Lost and Found” of the ‘Boston Pilot’,
January-April 1846. Terrence M. Punch…………………………………………..79

Monumental Inscriptions at Loughcrew Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny………………………………………….85

An Inventory of Killeen Castle in 1735-36……………………………………….103

Entries relating to Irish Persons in the Marriage Register of the Parish
Of Portpatrick, Wigtownshire, Scotland…………………………………………..107

The 1851 Census Returns for the Parish of Aglish, Co Kilkenny………………129

Some Irish Immigrant Weddings in Nova Scotia 1841-1845.
Terrence M. Punch……………………………………………………………………133

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………..146

CONTENTS
Vol. X, No. 2, 1978

Gurly of Wexford and Carlow: the Maternal Lineage of
George Bernard Shaw. Brian de Breffny……………………………………………69

Inhabitants of Graige and Knocktopher, Co. Kilkenny, in 1797………………..73

Entries from the Family Bible of P.J. McNulty…………………………………….76

The Inventory of John Mahon of Strokestown, Co. Roscommon, 1708……….77

Letters from Connaught to a Wild Goose.
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………….81

The Silvermakers of Limerick. Douglas Bennett with Biographical Notes
Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………………………………..99

Some Irish Poor in Lambeth 1834-1846. C. R. Webb…………………………..108

Irish Ancestors in the “Lost and Found” of the ‘Boston Pilot’,
1840-41. Terrence M. Punch………………………………………………………..116

Monumental Inscriptions in the Church and Graveyard of Agher,
Co. Meath. Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny…………………………….129

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………..139

CONTENTS
Vol. XI, No. 1, 1979

Our Tenth Birthday. Rosemary fflolliott………………………………………………1

Entries from the Family Bible of Stirling Smith of Rush, Co. Dublin……………..3

Mid-19th Century irish Deserters in New Zealand.
Verna Mossong……………………………………………………………………………4

Some Lists of Mid-18th Century Linen Drapers in South East Ulster…………….9

The Pembertons of Dublin. Brian de Breffny……………………………………….14

Abstracts of Some Neale and O’Neill Wills, Administrations and
Marriage Licence Bonds from the Diocese of Ferns……………………………….27

Household Lists 1826-1838 made by Lady Godfrey of Kilcoleman
Abbey, Co. Kerry. Valerie M. Bary……………………………………………………30

Registers of the First Presbyterian Church of Newry Co. Down.
1779-1796……………………………………………………………………………….45

Tablets and Headstones in the Church and Graveyard of Dunboyne
Church of Ireland, Co. Meath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny…………………………………………….68

CONTENTS
Vol. XI, No. 2, 1979

Baptisms of the first Presbyterian Church of Newry, Co.Down, 1809-1822 ffolliott, Rosemary

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1828. Ellis, Eilish

Tablets & headstones in the Church and graveyard of Dunboyne Church of Ireland, Co. Meath Moore, Beryl F. & Kenny, Michael

The Family Bible of John Ganley of William St., Limerick Cantwell, Brian J.

The hunting Diaries (1863-1872) of Sir John Fermor Godfrey of Kilcoleman Abbey, Co. Kerry Bary, Valerie M.

CONTENTS
Vol. XII, Nos. 1 and 2, 1980

An Investigation into the Connacht Ancestry of Mary Ann Costello,
Mother of George Canning. Brian de Breffny………………………………………2

Some American Roots in Ireland. Paul Martin Doherty…………………………..6

An Inventory of Reynella, Co. Westmeath in 1827……………………………..10

The Hunting Diaries (1873-1881) of Sir John Fermor Godfrey of
Kilcoleman Abbey, Co. Kerry.
Valery M. Bary…………………………………………………………………………13

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1830-31.
Eilish Ellis………………………………………………………………………………26

Entries from the Brady Family Bible……………………………………………….35

Pupils of Samuel Whyte’s School in Dublin, Listed by Him in 1772
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………….36

Emigrant irish: The Crucial First Generation.
Terrence M. Punch……………………………………………………………………43

Co. Carlow Freeholders in 1767……………………………………………………46

The families of Gaughran and Vaughey of Slane, Co. Meath,
as Recorded in Slane Vestry Books, 1738-1862.
C. E. F. Trench……………………………………………………………………….47

Passengers aboard the ‘Buchannon’, Newry to New York,
August, 1765…………………………………………………………………………52

Monumental Inscriptions at Nantinan, Co. Limerick
M. J. Dore…………………………………………………………………………….53

The Will of Mary Lanigan of Cork Hill, Dublin, 1827…………………………..63

Passengers aboard the Thetis, Cork to Bathurst, New Brunswick,
In April, 1837. Paul Delicaet………………………………………………………65

Registers of the First Presbyterian Church of Newry, Co. Down
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………..67

Tombstones in Drumlargan Churchyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F.E. Moore and Josephine Maguire……………………………………82

Canada Company Remittances, 1834. Gerald Merrick………………………..84

County Louth Game Licences in 1813…………………………………………..87

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..89

CONTENTS
Vol. XIII, No. 1, 1981

A family of Mahony in Cos. Kerry and Limerick.
Brian de Breffny………………………………………………………………………1

Mary Flynn’s Register………………………………………………………………..3

Canada Company Remittances, 1844. Gerald Merrick………………………….4

Members of Two Dublin Societies in 1772………………………………………10

The Magans of Umma, Parish of Ballymore, Co. Westmeath.
Liam Cox……………………………………………………………………………..12

Stucco Work by Patrick Osborne at casteltown Cox. Brian de Breffny……..15

“Declaration” against the Repeal of the Union, 1830.
P. Beryl Phair………………………………………………………………………..18

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1832.
Eilish Ellis……………………………………………………………………………37

Registers of the First Presbyterian Church of Newry, Co. Down
Rosemary ffolliott………………………………………………………………….42

Tablets and Headstones in Athboy Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F. E. Moore and Michael Kenny……………………………………….52
Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………….72

Mary Ann Costello: Addenda and Corrigenda………………………………….73

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..73

CONTENTS
Vol. XIII, No. 2

Earbery of Ballincollig and Shandangan, Co. Cork.
Brian de Breffny. ………………………………………………………………….77

Emigration from the Workhouse at Ennistymon, Co. Clare, 1850-1860
Dr. S. C. O’Mahony. ………………………………………………………………79

Luke Mahon’s Inventory. Rosemary ffolliott. …………………………………83

Entries from the Family Bible of Robert and Sarah Jane Kilfeder………….86

Humphrys of Knockfad, Co. Cavan. Brian de Breffny…………………………88

A Quaker Wedding at Lisburn, Co. Down, in 1867
Michael Goodbody………………………………………………………………….90

Some Protestant Householders in the Parishes of Ferns and
Ballycanew and Killtrisk, Co. Wexford in the Late 18th Century……………93

The Earliest Presbyterian Register of Waterford, 1761-1813.
Julian C. Walton……………………………………………………………………94

“Declaration” against the Repeal of the Union, 1830.
P. beryl Phair. …………………………………………………………………….104

Tablets and Headstones in Athboy Old Graveyard, Co. Meath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny……………………………………….113

A Family of Mahony in Cos. Kerry and Limerick: Corrigenda……………….124

Reviews. …………………………………………………………………………..125

CONTENTS
Vol. XIV, No. 1, 1982

Robinson of Killogeenaghan – a Westmeath Quaker Family.
Liam Cox……………………………………………………………………………….1

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1835
Eilish Ellis……………………………………………………………………………..6

The Family of Fish of Castle Fish, Co. Kildare.
Patrick Montague-Smith……………………………………………………………13

Tenants of P.J. Smyth at Gort, Co. Galway in 1805…………………………..20

Extracts from the Church of Ireland Parish Registers of
Nantinan, Co. Limerick. Viola Reid………………………………………………22

Genealogies of the Lowry Family Bible.
Margaret L. Williams………………………………………………………………24

Gentlemen of the Counties Clare and Limerick who were in
favour of the Union In 1799……………………………………………………..30

Abstracts of Wills…………………………………………………………………35

Headstones in St. Mary’s Churchyard, Delvin, Co. Westmeath.
Dr. Beryl F.E. Moore and Michael Kenny……………………………………….39

CONTENTS
Vol. XIV, No. 2, 1982

The Hopper family. Bruce S. Elliott……………………………………………59

Letters to John Crone of Doneraile, Co. Cork, 1763-1781.
Brian de Breffny………………………………………………………………….74

Emigration from the Limerick Workhouse, 1848-1860.
Dr. S.C. O’Mahony………………………………………………………………..83

Game Licences in Co. Clare, 1803-1821………………………………………95

Canada Company Remittances, January- May 1845.
Gerald Merrick……………………………………………………………………..99

Monumental Inscriptions in the Church of Ireland Parish Graveyard at
Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. M. J. Dore ………………………………………….105
(Note: See Corrigenda for these in Vol. XVI, NO. 1, 1984)

Abstracts of Wills………………………………………………………………..121

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………126

CONTENTS
Vol. XVI, No. 1, 1984

The Turpin family of Tullamore, Co. Offaly
Robert W. Brown……………………………………………………………………..1

Businessmen of Ennis, Co. Clare, early in the Napoleonic Wars……………..6

Tombstones in Clady Graveyard, Bective, Co. Meath.
Dr. beryl F.E. Moore and Mrs. Josephine Maguire……………………………….9

The Co. Cork Ancestry of the Maddens of Travencore, Melbourne
Australia. Stirling Macoboy………………………………………………………..14

Captain Balfour’s Auction, 15th March 1741-2.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………..21

The Family of Dr. Samuel Bryson of Holywood, Co. Down.
Joseph Clint and Roger Blaney……………………………………………………32

A List of Protestants in the Barony of Mohill, Co. Leitrim in 1792………….35

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1836.
Eilish Ellis…………………………………………………………………………….37

Two Lists of Persons Resident in the Vicinity of Newcastle,
Co. Limerick in 1793 and 1821……………………………………………………40

Irish Soldiers Stationed on the Coast of Coromandel in India on
31st December, 1766. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………45

Monumental Inscriptions in the Church of Ireland Parish Graveyard at
Rathkeale, Co. Limerick Corrigenda……………………………………………..53

Reviews………………………………………………………………………………54

CONTENTS
Vol. XVI, No. 2, 1984

The Romance of the Secret Ancestor. Rosemary ffolliott……………………..57

Markham of Nunstown and Callinafercy, Co. Kerry.
Brian de Breffny……………………………………………………………………..60

Census of Protestants in the Parishes of Shanrahan and Tullagherton,
Co. Tipperary in 1864-1870.
Rev. Iain Knox……………………………………………………………………….61

The Peppards of Cappagh, Co. Limerick. Brian de Breffny……………………68

Devonsher of Co. Cork. Rosemary ffolliott………………………………………71

Register of Pupils of Doncarney School, Co. Meath in 1873.
Michael Ward………………………………………………………………………..75

Protestant Householders in the Parish of Templecrone,
Co. Donegal in 1799, With a list of the Churchwardens of the same
parish, 1775-1900. Rev. Iain Knox……………………………………………….78

Free Settlers in New South Wales in 1835-6. Eilish Ellis……………………..80

Edouart in Ireland. Brian de Breffny…………………………………………….107

The Burgalry at William Leeson’s House, Bolingbroke, Co. Tipperary
In 1785. Rosemary ffolliott……………………………………………………….118

Captain Balfour’s Auction – Addenda……………………………………………121

Reviews……………………………………………………………………………..122

CONTENTS
Vol. XVIII, No. 1, 1985

Lost Estates and Vanished Glories. Brian de Breffny……………………….1

Extracts from the Church of Ireland Registers of Dunshaughlin,
Co. Meath, 1803-1837. Raymond Refaussé…………………………………..2

Ffolliott of Cork.
Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………………………………………4

The Rev. James Hopwell’s Will. Anne M. Storey……………………………..8

Emigration from the Workhouse of Nenagh Union,
Co. Tipperary, 1849-1860. Dr. S. C. O’ Mahony…………………………….10

A daughter’s Recollections of the Langfords of Kilcosgriff,
Co. Limerick. Randolf Vigne……………………………………………………18

Game Licences for Co. Offaly and Co. Galway in 1821…………………….23
Census of Parishoners in Clogheen Union, Co. Tipperary in 1873,

1877 and 1880. Rev. Iain Knox………………………………………………..25
Up for Sale. Ada K. Longfield (Mrs. Leask), M.R.I.A………………………..30

The Rev. Edward Bacon’s Register.
Rev. Iain Knox……………………………………………………………………35

Voters in the Limerick City Election of 1817. Rosemary ffolliott…………49

CONTENTS
Vol. XVII, No. 2, 1985
The Reverend John Chaloner.
Desmond Chaloner……………………………………………………………….59

Some Household Auctions advertised in ‘Finns’s Leinster Journal’
in the 1790’s. Ada K. Longfield (Mrs. Leask)………………………………..63

The Morrogh’s of Kilworth, Co. Cork.
Francis J. Vaughan………………………………………………………………66

The Huguenot Family of Rambaut in Ireland.
Philip Marland Rambaut………………………………………………………..70

The Tenants of Sir Hugh Dillon Massey, near Clonlara in
Co. Clare, in 1844. John Bourke………………………………………………72

The Chief Inhabitants of the Parishes of St. Mary’s and St. John’s,
Limerick, in 1813………………………………………………………………..75

The Mitchells of Mitchellsfort, Co. Cork, and of London.
Leslie R.V. Mitchell and Rosemary ffolliott…………………………………77

Notes on some Portarlington Families, 1860-1893
Harold J. Storey…………………………………………………………………82

The Rev. Edward Bacon’s Register.
Rev. Iain Knox………………………………………………………………….96

Reviews………………………………………………………………………..116