Category Archives: Records

1931 Trade Directory, Co. Offaly

Directories set out to record the ‘principal inhabitants’ of a community, particularly those in trade or the professions. Directories were put together by individuals and publishers for commercial purposes at intervals during the late 18th and 19th centuries. Here is the 1931 Trade Directory, exclusive to From-Ireland.net:


In Ireland, many of the towns had a square, and around the square were houses (homes) with one or two shops or business’s. The streets of the town all went from that square. Most towns had a ‘Main street’ – some called it a High street, and it was usually on that main street that the majority of shops and businesses were located. Shops had one or two large windows depending on the size of the shop. Many Public houses had a grocery section. You walked in the door and the grocery section was at the front of the shop with the pub at the back – usually a wooden division separating both. The Grocer or Publican may have had a field or more behind the building, cows were milked and the milk was sold to those who would bring in their ‘Jimmy’ cans. Most business men/people had more than one occupation. The Publican as described above was also the Grocer and if he sold milk then he could also be described as a Dairy man. As you go through this list of names you will see that many.

1931 Trade Directory, Co. Meath

Directories set out to record the ‘principal inhabitants’ of a community, particularly those in trade or the professions. Directories were put together by individuals and publishers for commercial purposes at intervals during the late 18th and 19th centuries. Here is the 1931 Trade Directory, exclusive to From-Ireland.net:


In Ireland, many of the towns had a square, and around the square were houses (homes) with one or two shops or business’s. The streets of the town all went from that square. Most towns had a ‘Main street’ – some called it a High street, and it was usually on that main street that the majority of shops and businesses were located. Shops had one or two large windows depending on the size of the shop. Many Public houses had a grocery section. You walked in the door and the grocery section was at the front of the shop with the pub at the back – usually a wooden division separating both. The Grocer or Publican may have had a field or more behind the building, cows were milked and the milk was sold to those who would bring in their ‘Jimmy’ cans. Most business men/people had more than one occupation. The Publican as described above was also the Grocer and if he sold milk then he could also be described as a Dairy man. As you go through this list of names you will see that many.

1931 Trade Directory, Co. Westmeath

Directories set out to record the ‘principal inhabitants’ of a community, particularly those in trade or the professions. Directories were put together by individuals and publishers for commercial purposes at intervals during the late 18th and 19th centuries. Here is the 1931 Trade Directory, exclusive to From-Ireland.net:


In Ireland, many of the towns had a square, and around the square were houses (homes) with one or two shops or business’s. The streets of the town all went from that square. Most towns had a ‘Main street’ – some called it a High street, and it was usually on that main street that the majority of shops and businesses were located. Shops had one or two large windows depending on the size of the shop. Many Public houses had a grocery section. You walked in the door and the grocery section was at the front of the shop with the pub at the back – usually a wooden division separating both. The Grocer or Publican may have had a field or more behind the building, cows were milked and the milk was sold to those who would bring in their ‘Jimmy’ cans. Most business men/people had more than one occupation. The Publican as described above was also the Grocer and if he sold milk then he could also be described as a Dairy man. As you go through this list of names you will see that many.

Griffith’s Primary Valuation Records, Co. Fermanagh

From the 1820s to the 1840s a complex process of reform attempted to standardise the basis of local taxation in Ireland. The first steps were to map and fix administrative boundaries through the Ordnance Survey and the associated Boundary Commission. The next step was to assess the productive capacity of all property in the country in a thoroughly uniform way. Richard Griffith, a geologist based in Dublin, became Boundary Commissioner in 1825 and Commissioner of Valuation in 1827. The results of his great survey, the Primary Valuation of Ireland, were published between 1847 and 1864. The valuation is arranged by county, barony, Poor Law Union, civil parish and townland, and it lists every landholder and every householder in Ireland.


My tables are sorted alphabetically by Occupiers’ name – any Immediate Lessor may be listed numerous times throughout a parish. Immediate Lessor names are not sorted alphebetically

In those instances when a person is listed twice in the same townland and the Immediate lessor was the same for each entry I have the occupiers name once and indicated how many times that name occurs in that townland beside it.

I have excluded the name of Immediate Lessors of Vacant properties when that person was already listed as being an Immediate Lessor in the same townland. The names of Immediate Lessors of vacant properties are included if that person was not listed as an Immediate Occupier previously in that townland.

In those instances when a person is listed twice in the same townland and the Immediate lessor was the same for each entry I have the occupiers name once and indicated how many times that name occurs in that townland beside it. I have excluded the name of Immediate Lessors of Vacant properties when that person was already listed as being an Immediate Lessor in the same townland. The names of Immediate Lessors of vacant properties are included if that person was not listed as an Immediate Occupier previously in that townland.

The Immediate Lessor is the person who owns or leases the property from the Landholder. The Occupier is the person who leases the land from the Immediate Lessor. The Occupier, in turn, may sub-let part of the property that they are listed as being the Occupier of, in which case, their name is then listed in the Immediate Lessor column. You need to see the original pages of the Griffiths Valuation which lists the type of property being leased.

1901 Census, Co. Fermanagh

The household returns and ancillary records for the censuses of Ireland of 1901 and 1911, which are in the custody of the National Archives of Ireland, represent an extremely valuable part of the Irish national heritage. Here are From-Ireland.net’s 1901 Census, Ireland records:


1901 Census, Co. Monaghan

The household returns and ancillary records for the censuses of Ireland of 1901 and 1911, which are in the custody of the National Archives of Ireland, represent an extremely valuable part of the Irish national heritage. Here are From-Ireland.net’s 1901 Census, Ireland records:


Griffith’s Primary Valuation Records, Co. Monaghan

From the 1820s to the 1840s a complex process of reform attempted to standardise the basis of local taxation in Ireland. The first steps were to map and fix administrative boundaries through the Ordnance Survey and the associated Boundary Commission. The next step was to assess the productive capacity of all property in the country in a thoroughly uniform way. Richard Griffith, a geologist based in Dublin, became Boundary Commissioner in 1825 and Commissioner of Valuation in 1827. The results of his great survey, the Primary Valuation of Ireland, were published between 1847 and 1864. The valuation is arranged by county, barony, Poor Law Union, civil parish and townland, and it lists every landholder and every householder in Ireland.


My tables are sorted alphabetically by Occupiers’ name – any Immediate Lessor may be listed numerous times throughout a parish. Immediate Lessor names are not sorted alphebetically

In those instances when a person is listed twice in the same townland and the Immediate lessor was the same for each entry I have the occupiers name once and indicated how many times that name occurs in that townland beside it.

I have excluded the name of Immediate Lessors of Vacant properties when that person was already listed as being an Immediate Lessor in the same townland. The names of Immediate Lessors of vacant properties are included if that person was not listed as an Immediate Occupier previously in that townland.

In those instances when a person is listed twice in the same townland and the Immediate lessor was the same for each entry I have the occupiers name once and indicated how many times that name occurs in that townland beside it. I have excluded the name of Immediate Lessors of Vacant properties when that person was already listed as being an Immediate Lessor in the same townland. The names of Immediate Lessors of vacant properties are included if that person was not listed as an Immediate Occupier previously in that townland.

The Immediate Lessor is the person who owns or leases the property from the Landholder. The Occupier is the person who leases the land from the Immediate Lessor. The Occupier, in turn, may sub-let part of the property that they are listed as being the Occupier of, in which case, their name is then listed in the Immediate Lessor column. You need to see the original pages of the Griffiths Valuation which lists the type of property being leased.

1931 Trade Directory, Co. Monaghan

Directories set out to record the ‘principal inhabitants’ of a community, particularly those in trade or the professions. Directories were put together by individuals and publishers for commercial purposes at intervals during the late 18th and 19th centuries. Here is the 1931 Trade Directory, exclusive to From-Ireland.net:


In Ireland, many of the towns had a square, and around the square were houses (homes) with one or two shops or business’s. The streets of the town all went from that square. Most towns had a ‘Main street’ – some called it a High street, and it was usually on that main street that the majority of shops and businesses were located. Shops had one or two large windows depending on the size of the shop. Many Public houses had a grocery section. You walked in the door and the grocery section was at the front of the shop with the pub at the back – usually a wooden division separating both. The Grocer or Publican may have had a field or more behind the building, cows were milked and the milk was sold to those who would bring in their ‘Jimmy’ cans. Most business men/people had more than one occupation. The Publican as described above was also the Grocer and if he sold milk then he could also be described as a Dairy man. As you go through this list of names you will see that many.

Griffith’s Primary Valuation Records, Co. Antrim

From the 1820s to the 1840s a complex process of reform attempted to standardise the basis of local taxation in Ireland. The first steps were to map and fix administrative boundaries through the Ordnance Survey and the associated Boundary Commission. The next step was to assess the productive capacity of all property in the country in a thoroughly uniform way. Richard Griffith, a geologist based in Dublin, became Boundary Commissioner in 1825 and Commissioner of Valuation in 1827. The results of his great survey, the Primary Valuation of Ireland, were published between 1847 and 1864. The valuation is arranged by county, barony, Poor Law Union, civil parish and townland, and it lists every landholder and every householder in Ireland.


My tables are sorted alphabetically by Occupiers’ name – any Immediate Lessor may be listed numerous times throughout a parish. Immediate Lessor names are not sorted alphebetically

In those instances when a person is listed twice in the same townland and the Immediate lessor was the same for each entry I have the occupiers name once and indicated how many times that name occurs in that townland beside it.

I have excluded the name of Immediate Lessors of Vacant properties when that person was already listed as being an Immediate Lessor in the same townland. The names of Immediate Lessors of vacant properties are included if that person was not listed as an Immediate Occupier previously in that townland.

In those instances when a person is listed twice in the same townland and the Immediate lessor was the same for each entry I have the occupiers name once and indicated how many times that name occurs in that townland beside it. I have excluded the name of Immediate Lessors of Vacant properties when that person was already listed as being an Immediate Lessor in the same townland. The names of Immediate Lessors of vacant properties are included if that person was not listed as an Immediate Occupier previously in that townland.

The Immediate Lessor is the person who owns or leases the property from the Landholder. The Occupier is the person who leases the land from the Immediate Lessor. The Occupier, in turn, may sub-let part of the property that they are listed as being the Occupier of, in which case, their name is then listed in the Immediate Lessor column. You need to see the original pages of the Griffiths Valuation which lists the type of property being leased.

1901 Census, Co. Antrim

The household returns and ancillary records for the censuses of Ireland of 1901 and 1911, which are in the custody of the National Archives of Ireland, represent an extremely valuable part of the Irish national heritage. Here are From-Ireland.net’s 1901 Census, Ireland records: