Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary, Co. Kerry

Lewis’ Topographical Dictionary comprises of several counties, cities, boroughs, parish and villages – with historical and statistical descriptions – of Ireland. Here are From-Ireland.net’s records for Co. Kerry.


  • Place
    Kilcummin
  • County
    Galway
  • Parish
    Kilcummin
  • Content
    KILCUMMIN, a parish, in the barony of MOYCULLIN, county of GALWAY and province of CONNAUGHT, containing, with the post-town of Oughterard, 9848 inhabitants.

    It comprises 93,982 statute acres, of which only 8811 are rated in the county books, the remainder being bog and mountain ; and includes within its limits several uninhabited islands, and the inhabited islands of Lettermullen, Innisherk, Dynish, Finish, and Nappagh in Kilkerrin and Greatman's bays.

    The principal seats are Lemonfield, the residence of T. O'Flahertie, Esq. ; Port Carrie, of J. Nolan, Esq. ; Ardvarn, of A. Ross, Esq. ; and Lodge of the Rev. Dr. Kirwan.

    The living is a perpetual cure, in the diocese of Tuam, united to those of Rahoon, Moycullen, and Ballinacourty, and in the patronage of the Archbishop ; the rectory is partly impropriety in T. B. Martin, Esq., and partly forms a portion of the union of St. Nicholas and wardenship of Galway. The tithes amount to £140, of which £70 is payable to the impropriator, £35 to the warden of Galway, and £35 to the perpetual curate. The church, which is in Oughterard, is a small neat building, for the erection of which the late Board of First fruits gave £600, in 1808. for the erection of the glebe-house, the same Board, in 1819 gave £450 and lent £50 : the glebe comprises 16 acres.

    In the Roman Catholic divisions this parish is partly in the diocese of Galway, and partly in that of Tuam : the former part is called Oughterard, from the chapel being at that place; the latter is united to part of Killanin, and is called the union or district of Killeen, in which are three chapels.

    About 220 children are educated in seven private schools. The town of Galway and a large portion of the adjoining country are supplied with turf from the district that stretches along the headlands of Kilkerrin and Greatman's bays ; and the inhabitants of the interior, through the medium of Lough Corrib, are hence supplied with sea-sand and sea-weed for manure. Several hundred boats are constantly employed in the conveyance of these articles, and during the intervals between the fishing seasons many of the fishing-boats are similarly occupied.

    From this place to Galway there are two sailing courses, one by the bay of Kilkerrin round Galin Head, where there is a tremendous sea with strong currents ; the other by Greatman's bay, by which vessels may keep in smooth water within the islands. This passage is, however, obstructed by the rocky pass of Dangan, which can only be sailed through at high tide, so that 200 boats are sometimes waiting for a passage. To remedy this evil, it is proposed to clear that channel and construct pleas, which would render the passage easy at most heights of the tide. The estimated expense of this great improvement is only £480. 3s. 4d., and the Board of Public Works have recommended that half should be paid by Government. A pier has been erected by the Fishery Board on the north-east side of Garotnna Island, in Greatman's bay.
  • Place
    Kilcummin
  • County
    Kerry
  • Parish
    Kilcummin
  • Content
    KILCUMMIN, a parish, in the barony of MAGONIHY, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER, 4.50 miles (N. E.) from Killarney, on the roads from that town to Castleisland and Millstreet ; containing 6637 inhabitants, and comprising 36,958 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, including 422 acres not titheable.

    A considerable portion consists of mountain pasture, bog, and coarse arable land. The soil is in general heavy; but in consequence of an abundant supply of lime, the state of agriculture has of late been much improved. The quarry at Carrigdulkeen., isolated in the midst of an extensive district of mountain and bog, produces a fine blue limestone, equally adapted for building and manure, and is worked to a considerable extent, there being no other within a circuit of several miles. A court is occasionally held at Five-mile-bridge, by the Earl of Kenmare's seneschal, for the manors of Ross and Molahiffe, at which debts not exceeding 40s., late currency are recoverable.

    The seats are Shanagh House, the residence of Mr. H. O'Sullivan ; and Rathmore, the property of D. Cronin, Esq,, now occupied by a society of monks of the order of La Trappe, a branch from the parent establishment at Mount Melleray, in the county of Waterford.

    The parish is in the diocese of Ardfert and Aghadoe : the rectory is impropriate in the Earl of Donoughmore, and the vicarage forms part of the union of Killarney. The tithes amount to £526. 9s. 4.50d., of which £304. 18s. 7d., is payable to the impropriator, and the remainder to the vicar.

    In the Roman Catholic arrangements this parish is divided into East and West Kilcummin : the former, with the greater part of the adjoining parish of Nohoval-daly, forms the district of Knocknacoppel; and the latter forms a separate district, of which the chapel is situated at Kilcummin. In the district of Knocknacoppel are the chapel of that name, a large plain building ; Griorguillea chapel, recently rebuilt ; and that of Knocknagree, in Nohoval-daly; there is also a chapel attached to the establishment at Rathmore open to the public.

    In a public school at Inch, and two others in the parish, about 380 children are educated. To each of these schools the Earl of Kenmare contributes an annual donation ; and the late Mr. Cronin, of the Park, near Killarney, recently bequeathed £30 per anmim for the establishment and support of a school in each of the parishes of Kilcummin and Nohoval-daly.

    On the southern confines of the parish are two remarkable mountains, which from their peculiar shape are called "the pass," forming striking features in the mountain scenery on the road from Killarney to Cork. At their base is an ancient fort or rath, near which is a holy well resorted to by numbers of the peasantry on May-day. The ruins of the old church are situated on an eminence commanding an extensive prospect. The late Lord Barrymore was interred here.
  • Place
    Kilcummin
  • County
    Mayo
  • Parish
    Kilcummin
  • Content
    KILCUMMIN, or KILCOMMIN, a parish, in the barony of TYRAWLEY, county of MAYO, and province of CONNAUGHT, 4.50 miles (N.) from Killala, on the western side of the bay of Killala; containing 2,563 inhabitants.

    It comprises 4009 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act; the land is generally good and well cultivated, except on the coast, where the drifted sand injures the soil. Good stone is obtained here. At the northern extremity of the parish is Kilcummin Head, where is a coast-guard station, being one of the six in the district of Killala.

    The parish is in the diocese of Killala; the rectory is appropriate to the deanery and the precentorship of Killala, and the vicarage forms part of the union of Lacken; the tithes amount to £160, of which £93 is payable to the dean and the precentor, and £67 to the vicar.

    In the Roman Catholic divisions, also, it forms part of the union or district of Lacken.

    About 60 children are educated in two public schools, and 25 in a private school. There are some remains of the old church, near which, in a small arm of the sea, the French army under Gen. Humbert landed in 1798.