Tag Archives: 1790s

Marriage Records, Carrigeen and Mooncoin, Co. Kilkenny, 1789-91

Carrigeen & Mooncoin, Roman Catholic Parish Register


Marriage index 1789-1791

Marriages: Jan 26th, 1772 – March 4th, 1783
Jan 16th, 1789 – Feb 21st, 1814
Feb 21st, 1816 – Sept 27th, 1836
Jan 16th, 1837 – May 12th, 1879
NLI Pos. Pos 5019

The following is indexed according to the surname of the Groom. All spellings are as on the parish register. The townlands as named would seem to be part of a number of different civil parishes and whilst I have checked some townland names against those listed for county Kilkenny in the 1851 Townlands directory, I have not finished. In time, a table will be added to this set of parish records listing the various civil parishes involved and the different townland spellings. More indices will be added to this set of parish records in time.

In some cases, the placename was not given for either the Bride or Groom, it is possible that both were from the same place in these instances.

Mooncoin is listed as being the name of a Roman Catholic Union of a number of Civil Parishes. This means that the parish records, baptisms and marriages of people from townlands in those civil parishes should be found in the Mooncoin registers.

All references for the years mentioned 1789-1791 have been taken.

Name Abbreviations found in registers:
Wm = William Jas/Js. = James ; Mich/Mick. = Michael ; Margt. = Margaret ; Jn/Jno. = John or Jonathan; Ally = Anastasia (sometimes) ; Anty = Anastasia/Anastatia ; Lau. = Laurence ; Pat/Patt = Patrick ; May = Mary ; Jos. = Joseph ; Matt. = Matthew ; Onny = Winifred ; Cath. = Catherine ; Danl., Dan = Daniel; Hanna = Hanora or Anne ; Jer. = Jeremiah ; Sally = Sarah ; Bess = Elizabeth, Eliza ; Biddy/Bridgt. = Bridget ; Fanton = Finton. Nics./Nich = Nicholas ; Thos. = Thomas ; Nelly = Eleanor or Ellen ; Fanny = Frances

Name, Location, Name, Location, Year

Philip
Aylward
Jas Brennan
Kyran Brennan
John Brophy
Robbert Brown
James Bryan
William Burrows
Edmond Burrows**
Michael Carrol
John Carty
John Conisay
James Connell
John Connors
Dennis Conway
Edmond Corcoran
John Cunningham
John Dalton
James Dalton
Edmond Doudy
Jno Doyle
Michael Doyle
William Dunphy
William Dunphy
Peter Dunphy
James Durney
Michael Fahy
Edmond Fehen
Dennis Fielding
William Fleming?
John Flynne
?Bernard Foran
John Gahan
John Grant
Jno Hanlin
William Hearn
William Henebry
Patrick Henesy
Thomas Hoban
Robbert Kane
Thomas Kealey
Peter Kealey
John Keefe
Patrick Keefe
Thos Keenah
Michael Kehoe
Martin Kelly
Jno Kenedy
William Kennedy
James Keyly
Andrew Kna..?
Walter Knox
Patrick Knox
Martin Kyrah
Andrew Lester
Michael Macky
John Magrath
Thos Maher
James Maher
Patrick Maher
Jno Maher
Michael Mangan
John McCarthy
Walter McDonnel
Edmd McDonnel
James McDonnell
William McDonnell
Andrew McKee
Edmond McKee
Michael Moran
Laurence Murphy
James Neagle
John O’Brien
Edmond Phelan
John Phelan
John Power
Michl Power
Simon Power
Tim Power
Thomas Quin
Michael Quin
Edmond Ryan
John Ryan
James Stapleton
James Sulivan
Edmond Synnot
Edmond Walsh
William Walsh
Nicholas Walsh
Walter Walsh
Richd Walsh
Edmond Walsh
Edmond Walsh
Walter Walsh
James Walsh
Michael Walsh
Willm Walsh
Edmond Walsh
Richard Walsh
David Whyte
Grange
Cashel
Tobrid
Cloga
Kilmacaw
Grange
Not given
Rathkyran
Polrone
Moanchoine
Not given
Fidown
Moanchoine
Monehoine
Monchoine
Not given
Skulfrah?
Templorum parish
Ardy
Kilcommons parish
Rathkyran
Lu?pney
Dornane
Moanchoine
Moanchoine
Carrigeen Parish
Not given
Kilanagannants
Clon?cummy
Monchoine
Munchoin
Not given
Lickelstown
Dowrnane
Ashgrove
Dornane
Clonaner?d
Capenagh?
Carrigeen
Andry
Ballynabobly
Moanchoine
Lisdroleen
Lickelstown
Tobrid
Monchoine
Polrone
Portlaw Parish
Ardry
Dornane
Kilmacow parish
Clogge
Carrigeen Parish
Monechoine
Not given
Portlaw Parish
Bally?gowra
Lu?pney
Ballyvareen parish of Ida
Moneehoine
Portnascully
Carrigeen Parish
Nicholastown
Mooneehoine
Cloga
Cloga
Not given
Ballygury
Moanchoine
Rathkyran parish
Clonmore
Cloncumanto
Lickelstown
Scart ?Poule
Monchoine
Ballynaholy
Tobrid
Aglish?
Not given
Lickelstown
Dornane
Not given
Capsanah
Moanchoine
Ballybrasil
Bahage
Ballygowry in Carrigeen Parish
Aglish
Aglish
Fiddown
Clogge
Kilmacow parish
of this parish
Turkalom or Qurklacom?
Rathkyran
Not given
Carrigeen
Glin Gran?t
Not given
Mary Osborne
Margaret Keefe
Catherine Reiddy or Buddy
Bridget Aylward
Margaret Grant
Margaret Nowlan
Catharine Grant
Mary Hearn
Elizabeth Walsh
Anne Power
Mary Byrn
Mary Brennan
Elioner McDonnel
Catherine Walsh
Joan Walsh
Mary Walsh
Mary Feoire
Catherine Dunphy
Catharine Dolehenty
Elinor Hoban
Mary Maguire
Anastase McDonnell
Margaret Broders
Honor Whibby
Joan Dunne
Catharine Deverix
Catherine Walsh
Catherine Walsh
Catherine Walsh
Catharine Joyce
Mary Sullivan
Mary (Margaret same record) Brennan
Eleanor Brennan
Mary Rider
Mary Guair?ey
Catharine Broders
Mary Power
Mary Keefe
Mary Walsh
Anastase Kealy
Mary Walsh
Mary Connel
Anne Walsh
Mary Quin
Mary Hays
Anstas Walsh
Bridget Clancy
Catherine Knox
Bridget Dunphy
Eleanor Quin
Mary Walsh
Mary McDonnel
Margaret Kehoe
Catherine Haton
Catharine Cleary (Clary)
Elizabeth Feoire?
Honor Bohan
Anne McGuire
Margaret Walsh
Mary White
Eleanor Broder
Margaret Dunphy
Joan Dedy
Mary Slattery
Margaret Walsh
Margaret Boe
Mary Feoire
Anastase Phelan
Mary Grant
Honor Walsh
Eleanor Henebry
Mary Fresheam
Eleanor Grant
Catherine Kehoe (Cahoe)
Eleanor Moran
Eleanor Commins
Joan Dunphy
Mary McDonnel
Joan Brennan
Catherine Dolehenty
Catherine Forestall
Margaret McDonnel
Eleanor Quin
Mary Quin
Mary Moran
Else Commerford
Anstais Walsh
Margaret Walsh
Mary Walsh
Mary Maher
Mary Walsh
Margaret Dunphy
Anastasia Walsh
Eleanor Walsh
Joan Kelter
Anne Walsh
Margaret Dolohanty
Eleanor Quin?
Margaret Henebry
Silerofe?
Ballybrasil
Barrabehea
Cloga
Dungoly
Rathkyran
Dungoly
Rathkyran
Polerone
Moanchoine
Barrabeha or Noarr….?
Polerone
Moanchoine
Ballytarsna
Monchoine
Silverspring
Rathshruel?
Tubrid
Ratherick?
Moancoine
Rathkyran
Grange
Dornane
Moanchoine
Can’t read
Carrigeen parish
Cloga
Grange
Ashgrove
Monchoine
Munchoin
Farrensarron?
Lickelstown
Dowrnane
Rathkyran
Dornane
Ballybrasil
D….ne
Carrigeen
Ballygury
Curladdy
Moanchoine
Barrabehea
Lickelstown
Ballycurry
Monchoine
Polrone
Cloga
Curloddy
Dornane
Moan?
Clogge
Carrigeen parish
???
Rathkyran
Polerone
Bally?gowra
Lusney
Dungoly
Colrane?
Lu?pney
Carrigeen parish
Cloga
Clogge
Rathkyran
Emmil
Lickelstown
Ballyneurrig
Moanchoine
Rathkyran parish
Rathkyran
Kileralgen
Lickelstown
Tobrid?
Ballybrasil
Moonogen or cen
James
Aglish?
Lickelstown
Currachonmartin
Polerone
Polrone
Capsanah
Moanchoine
Ballybrasil
Moanchoine
Ballygowry in Carrigeen Parish
Lu?pney
Aglish
Riverquarter?
Lufny?
Ballytarsna
of this parish
Clago
Rathkyran
Kilvarron
Carrigeen
Likelstown?
Grange
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Parish Register (Surnames), St. Thomas’, Dublin, 1750-91

“Register of the Parish of St. Thomas, Dublin, 1750-1791”


The surnames below are found in the above register. The register has been published by the Representative Church Body Library. If you would like to know more about any record pertaining to any surname listed here, then the book is probbaly obtainable through inter-library loan. Alternatively, you could contact the Representative Church Body Library.

Names

Acheson
Adams
Adamson
Adderly
Aldworth
Alexander
Allen
Allexander
Alley
Ambrose
Anderson
Andoe
Annessley
Appleby
Appleton
Archbold
Armstrong
Arthure
Ashburner
Ashe
Ashenhurst
Ashly
Askins
Atkins
Atkinson
Auchmuty
Austin
Aylmer
Ayres
Bacon
Bagenal
Baggs
Baillie
Baird
Baker
Baldwin
Balfour
Bailie
Ball
Ballaquire
Bambrick
Banns
Bargier
Barker
Barlow
Barns
Barret
Barry
Bartlett
Bartley
Bassett
Batchelor
Bates
Bathers
Battersby
Bayly
Beans
Beatts
Beaty
Beckensale
Belfield
Bell
Belson
Bennet
Benson
Beresford
Berisford
Berry
Berwick
Betson
Bevan
Bibby
Bigger
Billing
Bincks
Bingham
Binks
Birch
Bird
Birnie
Black
Blacker
Blackham
Blackwood
Blair
Blake
Bland
Blaney
Bodkin
Boe
Bolen
Bollon
Bolton
Bonham
Bonnor
Borroughs
Bosman
Bourk
Bourke
Bowden
Bowen
Boyd
Boyle
Bradley
Brady
Braithwaite
Brakley
Bran
Bredin
Brigs
Brisco
Briscoe
Bromlay
Brook
Brooke
Brown
Browne
Brownrigg
Bruen
Bruslin
Brussells
Buchanan
Buckley
Bucknall
Bulkley
Bunbury
Burgess
Burgh
Burke
Burne
Burnet
Burnett
Burnyeats
Burroughs
Burton
Bury
Bushe
Butler
Butt
Bynon
Byrne
Caddell
Calbeck
Caldwell
Callaghan
Callender
Camerin
Camfield
Campbell
Candler
Cane
Cannin
Cannon
Cantrell
Capper
Cardot
Cardott
Carlen
Carncross
Caroli
Carpenter
Carrol
Carroll
Carson
Carter
Cartwright
Carty
Casey
Cassan
Cassey
Cassidy
Casson
Cathery
Caulfield
Chaboteaux
Chaloner
Chamberlain
Chambers
Chandler
Charlemont
Charleton
Chebsey
Chiney
Christmas
Christmass
Chubsey
Clark
Clarke
Clarkson
Clayton
Clements
Clerk
Clinch
Clinton
Close
Clough
Cobbe
Cockin
Codd
Coffee
Coffey
Coglan
Colclough
Cole
Coleman
Collins
Colshaw
Condran
Condron
Connelly
Conner
Connor
Conroy
Conry
Conway
Cooke
Cooley
Cooper
Coote
Cornet
Corry
Cosgrave
Cottrell
Cowan
Cowell
Cox
Coyle
Crabb
Craford
Cramer
Cranfield
Craven
Crawford
Creighton
Crocker
Croghan
Croker
Crolly
Crosbie
Crosthwaite
Crowen
Cubitt
Cuefell
Cuff
Cuffe
Cullen
Cummin
Cumming
Cunningham
Curtis
Curwen
Cusack
Cuthbert
Cutler
Dalton
Daly
Dannell
Darby
Darcey
Darcy
Dark
Darley
Darling
Dartrey
Davidson
Davis
Dawson
Day
De Bordz
Deane
Debutts
Deckella
Deering
Delany
Dempsey
Denham
Dennison
Derbyshire
Dering
Desvoeux
Devenish
Devereux
Devonish
Dick
Dickey
Dickson
Dier
Digby
Dignam
Dillon
Dimm
Dinham
Disney
Divine
Dixon
Dobbin
Dobbs
Dobson
Dockry
Dodd
Dodgins
Dogood
Donelson
Donkin
Donnellan
Donnelly
Donovan
Donstan
Doran
Dougherty
Doughty
Douse
Dowdall
Dowker
Dowling
Downes
Downing
Doyle
Doyne
Drean
Druit
Duff
Duggan
Duke
Dunavin
Duncan
Dunganson
Dunkin
Dunkison
Dunlap
Durham
Dutton
Duvall
Dyke
Earley
Eaton
Eccles
Echlin
Edgworth
Edwards
Egar
Eger
Elliott
Ellis
Emeson
Enery
Engel
Ennerey
Epwel
Epwell
Evans
Evatt
Eyers
Eyre
Eyres
Fagan
Falkiner
Farmer
Farrell
Farringdon
Fawson
Fazakerly
Feagon
Fell
Fennell
Fenwick
Ferguson
Fetherston
Fetherstone
Filgate
Finegan
Finlay
Finnegan
Fish
Fisher
Fittsummons
Fitzgerald
Fitzmorris
Fitzpatrick
Flanagan
Fleming
Fletcher
Flood
Forsayeth
Forster
Fortescue
Forth
Foster
Fox
Foxall
Foy
Franks
French
Friell
Frizell
Finegan
Finlay
Finnegan
Fish
Fisher
Fittsummons
Fitzgerald
Fitzmorris
Fitzpatrick
Flanagan
Fleming
Fletcher
Flood
Forsayeth
Forster
Fortescue
Forth
Foster
Fox
Foxall
Foy
Franks
French
Friell
Frizell
Fry
Fullead
Fullham
Fyfield
Gain
Gainer
Galagher
Galbraith
Gallagher
Galway
Gammon
Gardiner
Gardnier
Garragan
Gartside
Gartsides
Gaskin
Gass
Gastin
Gaston
Gaven
Gaynor
Gentleman
George
Gernon
Gerrard
Gerside
Gibling
Gibson
Giff
Gill
Gillis
Gilmore
Ginn
Gitner
Gittner
Glascock
Glascow
Gledowe
Goddard
Godfrey
Godley
Goff
Golding
Goodbody
Goodwin
Gordon
Gore
Gorges
Gotheral
Goulding
Grace
Grady
Graham
Grattan
Grave
Graves
Graydon
Green
Greene
Gregory
Grierson
Griffin
Griffith
Griffiths
Grooms
Grubere
Grumley
Guest
Guinin
Guthry
Hacket
Haddick
Haffy
Hakett
Hall
Halpin
Haly
Hamerton
Hamilton
Hammet
Hanbury
Hand
Handcock
Handley
Hanlon
Hanne
Hardcastle
Harder
Harman
Harpur
Harrick
Harricks
Harris
Harrison
Hart
Hassler
Hastings
Hatch
Hatton
Haverly
Hawkins
Hawkshaw
Hawtry
Haycock
Hayes
Heath
Heathwood
Heatley
Heatly
Helden
Henderson
Hendy
Henry
Heog
Herbert
Herbret
Herrod
Hervey
Hewitt
Higginson
Higinbotham
Hill
Hinchey
Hiney
Hoare
Hodgens
Hodges
Hodgins
Hodgson
Hodson
Hoey
Hogan
Holcroft
Hollerin
Holmes
Holt
Hornby
Horner
Hornidge
Hovenden
Howard
Hudson
Hughes
Humphreys
Humphry
Hunt
Husband
Hussey
Hutcheson
Hyde
Hyland
Hyton
Irvine
Irwin
Ivers
Jackson
Jacob
James
Jay
Jessop
Jewlley
Jinings
Johnson
Johnston
Jones
Jourdan
Juran
Jurgens
Kane
Kannon
Kavannagh
Kavenagh
Keating
Kehoe
Keirnan
Kellinghusen
Kelly
Kenedy
Kennan
Kennedy
Kenny
Kent
Keogh
Keon
Keough
Ker
Key
Kildea
Kilinghusen

Killinghusen
Killingley
Kimage
Kinch
Kinchla
King
Kingston
Kirchhoffer
Kirchoffer
Kirk
Kirkpatrick
Kirwan
Kirwin
Kitchen
Knight
Knox
Lamb
Lambart
Lambert
Land
Lang
Laurence
Law
Lawe
Lawless
Lawlor
Lawrence
Le Renard
Lea
Leathern
Ledgerwood
Ledwith
Lee
Leeson
Leggett
Leigh
Lemon
Leonard
Lesley
Leslie
Leslye
Lessley
Lesslie
Lewis
Lifford
Lilly
Lindsay
Lindsey
Lindsy
Lloyd
Lloyde
Loftus
Long
Lord
Lorguirfur
Lovett
Lowdon
Lowe
Lowry
Lowther
Lucas
Luggard
Lundy
Lunn
Lynam
Lynham
Lyon
Lyons
Lyster
Lyttle
Macartney
Macklin
Macnamara
Madden
Madders
Magan
Maginnes
Maginnis
Magrath
Mahon
Makeever
Makenzie
Makeveer
Malleverer
Malone
Malowney
Mangaurin
Mannin
Manseragh
Mansergh
Manwaring
Mara
Marlay
Martin
Massey
Mather
Mathews
Maturin
Maulaverer
Mauleverer
Mauroumet
Mauroumett
Maxwell
May
Mayers
Mayne
Mayrins
Mazier
Maziere
McAlester
McAlister
McAuley
McAvoy
McCahan
McCahin
McCann
McCasland
McCaver
McClane
McClelland
McConnrigall
McCormick
McCullagh
McDaniel
McDannell
McDermot
McDermott
McDonagh
McDonnell
McDonough
McEvoy
McGowan
McGuinness
McGusty
McKeon
McKinzie
McLinn
McLoy
McMahon
McManis
McManus
McMullan
McMullen
McVoy
McWilliam
Mead
Meares
Mears
Meathers
Medlicott
Menzeis
Menzies
Mercer
Meredyth
Metge
Middleton
Milbank
Millbank
Miller
Mills
Minchin
Minis
Mitchell
Molesworth
Molloy
Molony
Molyneux
Monck
Monckton
Monk
Monks
Montgomery
Mooney
Moore
Moran
Morecraft
Moren
Morgan
Morris
Morrison
Morrisson
Morrow
Mottley
Mountflorence
Mountmorres
Muilix
Mulavan
Mulchay
Mu]lin
Mulony
Murphy
Murray
Murry
Muspratt
Mussenden
Muston
Myers
Myhill
Myler
Nairac
Neal
Neale
Nesbit
Nesbitt
Newcomen
Newenham
Newinham
Newland
Newlin
Newton
Nichols
Nicholson
Nilan
Nillon
Nix
Noble
Nolan
Norcote
Norcott
North
Northwood
Norwood
Nowlan
O’Brian
O’Brien
O’Conner
O’Donel
O’Flaherty
Ogle
O’Neal
Oram
Ormsby
Orom
Osborne
Oughton
Owen
Padden
Paget
Pagett
Pain
Paisent
Palmer
Pandcock
Pardoe
Parker
Parks
Parren
Parsons
Patrick
Paul
Paulet
Paumier
Pearce
Pearson
Pebby
Pennington
Penrose
Pepper
Perces
Perkins
Perrin
Perry
Pery
Peyton
Phepo
Phepoe
Phibbs
Phillips
Pidgeon
Pierce
Pinto
Player
Pleayer
Plewis
Plunket
Polly
Poole
Porter
Powell
Power
Poynton
Pratt
Price
Primwrite
Purcell
Purdon
Quin
Quire
Quirk
Raferty
Rafferty
Rainsford
Ralph
Ram
Ransford
Ranson
Ratcliffe
Rathborne
Rawlins
Read
Reade
Reddy
Reed
Regoe
Reilly
Reily
Revell
Ribton
Rice
Rich
Richards
Richardson
Richey
Richmond
Ricketts
Rider
Rilly
Riverston
Roarke
Roberts
Robinson
Rochfort
Roe
Rogers
Rooney
Roper
Rosborough
Roscoe
Rose
Ross
Rosscraft
Rotton
Rourke
Roycraft
Rubotson
Rubottom
Rumney
Russell
Ryan
Ryder
Sabine
Sadler
Salev
Sancey
Sandford
Sands
Sandys
Saunders
Saunderson
Savage
Scale
Scanlan
Scott
Scully
Seagrove
Seeley
Sempill
Semple
Sensi
Seurlog
Shanley
Shea
Sheen
Shepphard
Sheridan
Sherlock
Sherrard
Sherred
Shirwin
Siggins
Simcox
Simms
Simpson
Simys
Sinck
Siree
Skeys
Slade
Slator
Sletsick
Small
Smart
Smith
Smyth
Snell
Sneyd
Sneyde
Snow
Somers
Somervile
Sommers
Southwell
Spencer
Sperills
Spicer
Spotswood
Sproule
Squire
Stacey
Stackpoole
Stacy
Stafford
Stalwood
Standish
Staples
Staunton
Stearne
Steel
Steele
Stelsick
Stephens
Stewart
Stopford
Stratford
Strattan
Streton
Stretton
Stringfellow
Strong
Stubbs
Styels
Summonday
Swan
Swanack
Sweeney
Sweeny
Swift
Swinburn
Swiny
Symes
Symms
Talbot
Taylor
Templeton
Tenant
Tench
Ternan
Ternon
Tew
Tharp
Thomas
Thompson
Thornhill
Thornton
Thorp
Tiddeman
Tiernan
Tighe
Timmins
Tindall
Tisdall
Todd
Toner
Topham
Tottenham
Towers
Townsend
Tracey
Travell
Travers
Trench
Trocke
Trumble
Tuitelerg
Turner
Tyndale
Tyrone
Tyrrell
Tyzack
Underwood
Uniacke
Usher
Vandeleur
Vandoran
Vanwingarden
Veiney
Verney
Vernon
Vernor
Vessey
Vierpyl
Vierpyle
Vizer
Vokes
Waddle
Wade
Waite
Walch
Waldron
Walker
Wall
Waller
Walpole
Walsh
Walton
Wandesford
Warburton
Ward
Ware
Waring
Warner
Warren
Warring
Wash
Watson
Watterson
Webb
Webber
Weber
Webster
Weekes
Weeks
Welton
Wesley
Wessell
Westenra
Weyms
Wharton
Whelan
White
Whitelock
Whitelocke
Whitemanv
Whiteway
Whitley
Whitty
Wiggans
Wilcocks
Wilde
Wilder
Wilding
Wildridge
Wilkinson
Willet
Willett
Williams
Williamson
Willington
Willis
Willoughby
Wilson
Wilwrich
Witherall
Withworth
Wolley
Wolseley
Wolsely
Wolsley
Wood
Woods
Woolwride
Worthington
Woseley
Wren
Wybrant
Wymes
Wynne
Yeates
Yeats
Young
Younghusband

Children Attending Mountmellick Quaker School, Co. Laois, 1786-94

Over 160 names and surnames of Co. Laois children attending Mountmellick Quaker School in the later 1780s and early 1790s.


Surname Name Year
Alexander
Alexander
Alexander
Ashton
Ashton
Atkinson
Barnes
Barnes
Bewley
Birkett
Blomer
Bloomer
Bloomer
Brennan
Brennan
Brown
Brown
Cape
Cape
Cape
Corlett
Davis
Delap
Dickinson
Dickinson
Flanagan
Forster
Foster
Gatchell
Gatchell
Gatchell
Gaw
Gouche
Harvey
Harvey
Hogg
Hogg
Hogg
Hogg
Hogg
Hogg
Hudson
Hudson
Hudson
Jessop
Jessop
Jessop
King
King
King
Lecky
Lynas
Malone
Malone
Martin
Martin
Martin
McClean
McDowell
McNamara
Middleton
Middleton
Millner
Millner
Millner
Millner
Millner
Millner
Neale
Neale
Neale
Neale
Neale
Neale
Neale
Nevitt
Nevitt
Noble
Noble
Noble
Noble
North
North
Parvin
Parvin
Pattison
Pearson
Pearson
Pearson
Pearson
Pearson
Pearson
Pearson
Peet
Rhodes
Richardson
Richardson
Richardson
Richardson
Robinson
Robinson
Ruddock
Ruddock
Russell
Russell
Saunders
Shaw
Shelly
Shelly
Shelly
Simpson
Simpson
Smith
Smith
Smithson
Smithson
Smyth
Steacy
Steacy
Steacy
Steacy
Steacy
Steacy
Taylor
Taylor
Thacker
Thacker
Thacker
Thacker
Thompson
Thompson
Thornton
Thornton
Valentine
Valentine
Valentine
Waring
Waring
Waring
Waring
Waring
Waring
Waring
Wheeler
Wheeler
Wheeler
Wheeler
White
White
White
Wilson
Wilson
Wood
Wright
Wright
Wright
Wright
Wright
Wyle
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Wyly
Elizabeth
George
Sarah
Mary
Susannah
Deborah
Elizabeth
Elizabeth
James
Sarah
William
Elizabeth
Margaret
Anne
Hannah
Esther
Mark
Elizabeth
Hannah
Sarah
Martha
James
William
Abigail
Mary
Elizabeth
Alexander
Elizabeth H.
Hannah
Mary
Susannah
John
Anne
Edward
Sarah
Elizabeth
Jane
John
Margaret
Mary
Sarah
Jane
Robert
Samuel
Benjamin
Deborah
Mary
George
Henry
Persis
Elizabeth
Mary
Isaac
Josias
Margaret
Sarah
Thomas
Elizabeth
Sarah
Jane
Elizabeth
Sarah
Abigail
Francis
George
James
Mary
Thomas
Deborah
Elizabeth
John
Richard
Sarah
William
William
Joseph
Susannah
Eleanor
Elizabeth
Jane
Mary
John
Phebe
Eleanor
Mary
Isaac
Eleanor
John
Joseph
Mary
Rachel
Susannah
Thomas
Edward
Thomas
Jacob
Richard
Robert
Robert
Deborah
Sarah
Phoebe
William
Lydia
William
Susan
Elizabeth
Alexander
Deborah
Sarah
James
John
Joseph
Samuel
Joseph
Thomas
George
George
Joseph
Joshua
Laurence
Mary
William
Robert
William
Hannah
John
Richard
Thomas
Benjamin
Elizabeth
Joseph
Mary
Anne
Elizabeth
Martha
Anne
Dorothy
Elizabeth
Joshua
Mary
Sarah
William
Abigail
Elizabeth
Francis
William
Isabella
John
William
Barcroft
Phoebe
John
Anne
Edward
John
Joshua
Thomas
Jacob
Alexander
Francis
Jane
John
John
Joseph
Lucia
Mary
William
1793
1793
1793
1789
1789
1794
1787
1789
1795
1795
1793
1789
1788
1787
1786
1792
1794
1789
1792
1792
1794
1786
1794
1791
1789
1793
1788
1786
1795
1792
1795
1788
1787
1793
1795
1792
1795
1786
1795
1787
1791
1793
1789
1789
1795
1794
1794
1790
1786
1790
1787
1786
1787
1787
1792
1788
1793
1787
1791
1792
1787
1787
1793
1786
1789
1788
1795
1786
1790
1791
1793
1790
1791
1792
1795
1792
1790
1789
1792
1789
1791
1792
1791
1792
1792
1788
1788
1793
1789
1788
1794
1792
1788
1792
1795
1787
1795
1787
1790
1793
1793
1786
1787
1793
1793
1795
1790
1789
1786
1786
1787
1788
1790
1795
1791
1791
1788
1786
1792
1786
1789
1792
1793
1787
1787
1790
1790
1790
1795
1789
1793
1786
1786
1788
1788
1789
1792
1794
1787
1788
1792
1795
1794
1789
1790
1790
1789
1786
1787
1788
1793
1786
1789
1790
1794
1789
1792
1792
1791
1793
1790
1794
1786
1789
1790
1786
1794
1787

An Account of the Arrest of Lord Edward Fitzgerald

Foreword by Frederick Fitzgerald:


“The Irish National Anthem, Amhrán na bhFiann (The Soldier’s Song) has been the subject of much comment in recent years. I am reliably informed by the ‘educated’ types who listen to the Irish national airways: that to make serious and profound pronouncements to the effect that it is time to change our national anthem is considered trendy and that it now enhances one’s Irishness or perhaps I should say ‘Oirishness’. Indeed I read that Dublin 4 types who express this idea and promote it in the best bistros and lounges also find it possible to describe themselves as republicans, albeit Post Paschal Republicans 1998 vintage. I have coined this title or appendage for these types who apparently believe that following the ‘Good Friday Agreement’ the Irish nation should now proceed to throw out the baby with the bathwater as it were. These people are confident that the tune is a major cause of division between north and south, it being to militaristic it it’s sentiment.

Perhaps these people should read or better still This extract is taken from the original narrative written by Mr. Nicholas Murphy, at whose house (now 151 Thomas Street, Dublin) Lord Edward Fitzgerald was arrested. The narrative is dated 29th November 1831, and is now in the possession of the Duke of Leinster at Carton.

Murphy was confined in Newgate as a state prisoner, without being brought to trial, for fifty-five weeks. During this time his house was occupied as a barrack, and all his goods were looted or destroyed.”

Contributed by Lord Frederick Fitzgerald to the Journal of the Kildare Archaeological & Historical Society.

“Arrest of the Late Lord Edward Fitzgerald”

“On the night of Friday, the 18th of May 1798, Lord Edward Fitzgerald came to my house, No. 153 Thomas Street, in company with a lady, (A Mrs. Moore, in whose husband’s house, No. 119 Thomas street, Lord Edward had been previously concealed) about the hour of ten or eleven o’clock at night. I did expect him the previous evening, and the reason I state this is, that a friend of his came to me, and requested that I would receive him, as he wished to move from where he was at present.. I was getting the house cleaned down and scoured, and I brought his friend in, and he saw the persons employed as I told him; he mentioned that it was not intended to remove him immediately, but said, “I think a week or ten days would answer.” I assented, and indeed with reluctance. However, I made no mention of that. In a few days previous to Lord Edward’s coming the Government had offered One Thousand Pounds Reward for his apprehension. I certainly felt very uneasy at this circumstance, and I wished very much to see Lord Edward’s friend, and where to see him I did not know. As a man of honour I wished to keep my word, and I could not think of refusing him admittance when he came. Unfortunately for him and myself, I did so. I expected him on Thursday, but he did not come till Friday, 18th May’98. I perceived he looked very bad from what he appeared when I saw him before. The lady that came with him did not stay long, and I made a tender of my services to go home with her as she lived in the neighbourhood. There was a person we met on our way that I believe was waiting for her. I had some knowledge of him myself, so I returned to the house with a troubled mind.

Lord Edward told me he was very bad with a cold, and it was easy to perceive it. I had procured for him some whey, and put some sherry wine in it. At this time he appeared quite tranquil, and went up to the room intended for him; the back room in the attic story. In the morning, he came down to breakfast, and appeared better than the night before. The friend that spoke to me concerning him came, I believe, about eleven o’clock; then it came out for the first time an account of the ‘recontre’ that took place the night before between Lord Edward’s party and Major Sirr’s (The Town Major). It is perfectly clear in my humble judgement that Major Sirr had known of his removal and the direction he intended to take ; for his part and Lord Edward’s party came in contact in a place called Island Street, the lower end of Watling street; they there met, and a skirmish took place, and in the confusion Lord Edward got off. However, one of the party (William McCabe) was taken, but could not, I believe, be identified. I found my situation now very painful, but nothing to what it was afterwards.

In the course of the day (Saturday 19th) a guard of soldiers, and I believe Major Swan, Major Sirr, a Mr. Medlicot, and another, were making a search at a Mr. Moore, Yellow Lion, in Thomas Street. A friend came and mentioned the circumstance to me. I immediately mentioned it to Lord E., and had him conveyed out of the house in a valley to one of the warehouses. While I was doing this, Mr. N. (i.e. Samuel Neilson) came and inquired of the girl if I was at home. I belive she said not. ‘Bid him be cautious,’ I think was what she told me that he said. I considered that conduct very ill-timed ; however, I am led to believe it was well-intended. On Saturday morning, the day of the arrest, there came a single rap on the door. I opened it myself, and a woman with a bundle appeared, and inquired if that was Mr. M (Murphy) and I said it was ; she informed me that she came from Mrs. M (Moore) and was desired to leave that bundle there. I knew not what it contained, but to my surprise, when I opened it, I found it to be a uniform of a very beautiful green colour, gimpt or braided down the front, with crimson or rose-colour cuffs, and a cape. There were two dresses – one a long-skirted coat, vest and pantaloons : the other, a short jacket that came round quite close, and braided in front; there was also a pair of overalls that buttoned from the hip to the ankle, with, I think, black Spanish leather inside; I suppose they were intended for riding. The bundle contained a cap of a very fanciful description, extremely attractive, formed exactly like a sugar-loaf, or, as Mr. Moore says, conically ; that part that went round the forehead green, the upper part crimson, with a large silk tassel, and would incline one side or the other occasionally when on the head. After placing Lord. E in the valley of the warehouse, I came down in a little time, and stood at the gate; the soldiers still at Mr. Ms (Moores) I perceived four persons walking in the middle of the street, some of them in uniform; I believe Yeomen. I believe Major Swan, Captain Medlicot, (of the City of Dublin Militia) &c., was of the party. Toward four o’clock Lord E. came down to dinner. Everything was supposed to be still now at this time. S. N. (Samuel Neilson) came to see us; dinner nearly ready; I asked S.N. to stay and dine, which he accepted. Nothing particular occurred, except speaking on a variety of subjects, when Mr. N., as if something struck him, immediately leaving us together. There was very little wine taken ; Lord E. was very abstemious ; in a short time I went out. Now the tragedy commenced. I wished to leave Lord E. to himself. I was absent, I suppose, about an hour ; I came to the room where we dined, being the back drawing room. He was not there. I went to the sleeping room. He was in bed. It was, at this time, about seven o’clock. I asked him to come down to tea. I was not in the room three minutes when in came Major Swan and a person following him with a soldier’s jacket, and a sword in his hand; he wore a round cap. When I saw Major Swan, I was thunderstruck. I put myself before him, and asked his business. He looked over me and saw Lord E. in the bed. He pushed by me quickly, and Lord E., seeing him, sprang up instantly and drew a dagger which he carried about him, and wounded Major Swan slightly, I believe. Major Swan had a pistol which he fired without effect; he immediately turned to me and gave me a severe thrust of the pistol under the left eye, at the same time desiring the person that came in with him to take me into custody. I was immediately taken away to the yard ; there I saw Major Sirr and about six soldiers of the Dumbarton Fencibles. Major Swan thought proper to run as fast as he could to the street, and I think he never looked behind him till he got out of danger, and he was the parading the flags, exhibiting his linen, which was stained with blood. Mr. Ryan supplied Major Swan’s place and came in contact with Lord E., and was wounded seriously. Major Sirr at that time came upstairs and keeping a respectful distance, fired a pistol shot at Lord E., in a very deliberate manner, and wounded him in the upper part of the shoulder. Reinforcements coming in, Lord E., surrendered after a very hard struggle. Lord Edward was imprisoned in Newgate.

Two surgeons attended daily on Lord E. Fitzgerald. It was supposed, the evening of the day before he died, he was delirious, as we could hear him with a very strong voice cry out ‘Come on! Come on! Damn you! Come on!’ He spoke so loud that the people in the street gathered to listen to him. He died the next day, early in the morning on the 3rd of June. The surgeon attended and opened the body. Then he was seen for the first time by the prisoners. He had about his neck a gold chain suspending a locket with hair in it. Thus died one of the bravest of men, from a conviction, I believe, that he wished to ameliorate the condition of his country. I shall endeavour to describe his person. I believe he was about 5 feet 7 inches in height, and a very interesting countenance ; beautiful arched eyebrows, fine grey eyes, a beautiful nose and high forehead, thick dark-coloured hair, brown or inclining to black. I think he was very like the late Lady Louisa Connolly about the nose and eyes. Any person he addressed must admire his manner, it was so candid, so good-natured, and so impregnated with good feeling; as playful and humble as a child, as mild and timid as a lady, and when necessary as brave as a lion. He was altogether a very nice and elegant formed man. Peace be to him ‘manes’.”

Note by Lord Walter FitzGerald

The two informers implicated in the betrayal of Lord Edward were Francis Higgins (proprietor of ‘The Freeman’s Journal’, at that time a paper in the interest of the Government), and Francis Magan, M.A., Barrister at Law. On the 20th of June 1798, Francis Higgins was paid the Government reward of £1,000 for Lord Edward’s capture (Fitzpatrick’s “Secret Service under Pitt”)
Lord Edward’s remains were placed in a vault under the East end of St. Werburgh’s Church in Dublin; and, owing to the damp state of these vaults, it became necessary to renew the coffin three times, viz.: – In February, 1844, by the orders of Lord Edward’s daughter, Lady Campbell ; again in 1874, by the 4th Duke of Leinster ; and lastly, in May, 1896, by the Trustees of the Leinster Estates.

Cumber Yeomanry Cavalry, 1797

The famous Volunteer force collapsed somewhat abruptly and ignominiously in 1793; and a militia force was the only safeguard of peace in the country which was seething with sedition and evidently heading for rebellion. In 1796 a yeomanry force, cavalry and infantry, officered by local gentlemen was raised for preserving order. The cavalry force was disbanded in 1814 and the infantry gradually lapsed and ceased to exist in 1834. The Yeomanry was employed in in the rebellion of 1798 and earned an unenviable reputation for harshness and cruelty. The force was controlled by Government by whom the officers were appointed; and the men were clothed and equipped by the estate and also were paid for nine days drill and when called up for permanent duty. The horses of the cavalry belonged to the men serving. The uniform of the officers was :- Red cloth , yellow facings, swallow tail; gilt brass chain epaulettes and grenade badge; embossed gilt buttons which bore the name of the Corps. The uniform of the rank and file was:- Tunic , red cloth, blue facings, and silver braid; rows of braid across the front and lines and loops on the back. Buckskin breeches; buttons bore name of Corps. The following is the monthly return of the Cumber Cavalry for 1797 .


Captain David Ross
1st Lieut Michael Ross
2nd Lieut Michael Ross junior

Privates

Alexander John
Bond Oliver
Bradley John
Bradley Pat
Christy Alex
Conway Henry
Dunn Robert
Eakin Sam
Hamilton Wm
Handcock H
Handcock Thos
Haslett Jas
Humphries Jos
Jameson John
Laughlin Jos
Logan Jas
Long Andre
Macgwire Duncan
Mc Olly Wm
McCullough James
McFaul Denis
McIldowney Jas
McIlhinny Wm
McLaughlin George
McLaughlin Jas
Millar Robert
Morrison James
Morrison James Jun
Morrison Thomas
Murphy Peter
Quigley Andrew
Ross John
Simpson William
Simpson Wm
Stevenson James
Swan Paul
Thompson Wm
Wigton James
Wilson Wm
Winnett Jos

transcribed from ‘Cumber Presbyterian Church and Parish by Revd John Rutherford’ pub 1939 and posted to the NIR-DERRY-L by Rachel Dysert, this page has ben created with her permission.