Dublin Assembly Rolls, 1716

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The Dublin City Assembly Rolls record the Minutes of the Dublin City Assembly (council) from 1441 to 1841. Transcriptions of these rolls exist as the ‘Calendar of Ancient Records of Dublin’. The calendars record a lot of the history of Dublin city, construction of the Bull Wall, the various prisons. Names given are not just those of the councilmen (aldermen, Sheriffs etc) but of ordinary people. Petitions were made to the council for monetary support. The index on this page lists the surnames found on the various abstracts on this web site and the manuscript number as given in the calendar transcription. Abstracts from a number of years are covered and it is hoped that more will be added to this web site.

Article: Roll xix. M. 37.
1716. April 13.-Second Friday after Easter 1716. (Easter Day 1st April, 1716)

[1.] Daniel COOKE, servant to the Right Honorable the Lord Mayor, setting forth that his Lordship has been at extraordinary expence on his coming into the new house, as also by reason of a new government in his Lordships time of Mayoralty, a parliament likewise sitting and the franchises to be rid and therefore prays an augmentation for his Lordships use: it is thereupon ordered that the treasurer of the city do pay to the petitioner, on the Lord Mayors warrant for his Lordships use, four hundred pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[2.] Jacob PEPPARD, esquire, setting forth that John PORTER and John TISDALL, esquires, present Sheriffs, by reason of the change of the government of this kingdom, and the sitting of a parliament this year, are considerable losers, the profits of the office not bearing half their expence, and praying an allowance: it is therefore ordered that the treasurer of the city do pay to the petitioner, on the Lord Mayors warrant, for the use of the present Sheriffs, two hundred pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

Roll xix.37
[3. ] Benjamin BURTON, esquire, in behalf of himself and the rest of the officers belonging to his regiment militia horse, setting forth that the trophy money, which this honorable city has already granted the said regiment, has fallen very short of the necessary trophies which belong to such a regiment, as per the following account :
For six trumpets at six pounds each £36
For six trumpet banners and two standards £75
For kettle-drum and banners £25
For two standard staffs £3
For seven housings and six pair of bags for the trumpets and kettle drummer £4 12s.
For seven livery coats for the trumpeters and kettle drummer £62 8s.
For repairing the arms got out of the stores £47
For hats laced for the trumpeters and kettle drummer £3 10s
For cutting swords for said regiment, 30 to each troop, at 7s. per sword. £63
For two hundred and forty carbine belts at five shillings each £60
Total: £379 10s.

And therefore prays a consideration: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioner for the use in the petition motioned, the sum of two hundred ninety nine pounds ten shillings, sterling, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

(m. 37 b.)

[4.] William QUAILE, alderman, setting forth that last assembly he obtained of the city a lease of lives renewable for ever of the ‘Three wolfs heads,’ in High street, but that Mr. MAPAS, the present tenant, whose time is not quite expired, refuses to attorn or come to reasonable terms for such his small time therein, which renders the lease for lives impracticable, and therefore prays a fee farm instead of the lease for lives, on a reasonable fine in lieu of the casual fines: ordered that the petitioner have a fee farm of the premises at twenty pounds per annum rent, and to pay to the treasurer, for the use of the city, thirty pounds as a fine, the rent to commence from Easter, 1719, and paying ten shillings to the Poor House for the use of the poor. Deeds to be drawn as Mr. Recorder shall advise.

[5.] William BAYLY having petitioned for further recompence for past services done the city, and a gratuity for what he is now doing and is to do: ordered that the treasurer do pay to the petitioner thirty pounds, sterling, on the Lord Mayors warrant, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[6.] On the petition of Bucknall TOTTIE, setting forth Tottie. that her father was Lord Mayor (Sir John TROTTY, Lord Mayor, 1671-2) that on the citys account he was imprisoned in London; that he died poor by reason of his sufferings on the city account; that the tithes of Rathdrum were set to one who broke, and is Rathdrum now in gaole for the arrears: which petition was referred, and the committee made the following report, “Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly, Report. we have examined the contents of the petition, and are of opinion that the petitioner be remitted the arrears of rent due out of the premises to the city till Michaelmas last, and that the petitioner is a fit object for the citys favour, 5th of April, 1716”

And having petitioned this assembly to have said report made an act of assembly: Ordered: That the arrears of rent be remitted the petitioner according to the above report.

[7] Certain of the commons, setting forth that James Butler, the late duke of Ormonde, is attainted of high treason, and actually in rebellion, and pray that the Butlers’ arms, on the front of the Tholsell, may therefore be taken down or defaced: ordered that the said arms be taken down.

[8] Certain of the commons, setting forth that it is customary for the City to present the secretaries of State with the freedom of the city; that the right honorable Martin BLADEN, esquire, hath not received that compliment as yet, and pray he may: ordered that the freedom of this city be presented to Mr. Secretary Bladen in a silver box, as usual, the expence thereof to be paid by the treasurer and allowed him on his accounts.

[9.] Certain of commons, setting forth, the same in behalfe of Mr. Secretary DELAFAY, and praying the like compliment may be paid him ordered that Mr. Secretary Delafay be presented with the freedom of this city in a silver box, the expence to be paid by the treasurer and allowed him on his accounts.

m. 36

[10.] Certain of the commons, praying to inlarge the assembly: ordered that the assembly be inlarged till nine o’clock.

[11] Richard GOODENOUGH, praying to be admitted city attorney: granted during the citys pleasure.

[12.] On the petition of Ann DENHAM, setting forth that she is the widow of Thomas Denham, Sheriff of Dublin in 1694-5) who was one of the Sheriffs of this city; that by reason of her great age she cannot now well subsist on the allowance of ten pounds per annum, formerly granted her by this honorable city, and prays an additional allowance: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioner ten pounds sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[13.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 13th April, 1716 :
Report. “Since our last report we have some more timber come in, and expect the remainder of our agreement for two hundred tun, with Captain ROGERS, every day, and likewise a quantity of kishes are soon expected. And it being now a proper season not only to go on with the pileing below Ringsend, as formerly proposed, but also to carry the bank of kishes up towards Mourneys dock, we intend to go on with the said work with all expedition, according’ to the best advice we can get.’ Ordered to proceed with all expedition.- Allowed.

“Pursuant to the order of last assembly, we have advised with council about removing the heaps of small stones which lye in the channel, laid down there by Mr.VERNON, which opinion we have hereunto annexed for your honors directions how to proceed therein.” Ordered to follow the councils advice and pursue his opinion.- Allowed.

The city wall between Mr. MERCER and ir John Rogersons keay being now a building, and the receiver general having signified to us that, the city is at present out of cash, therefore desires that the Ballast Office should advance the money for carrying on the said work, and that the city will repay the same when in cash, or when the office shall have occasion for the same, which we are willing to do, provided this honorable assembly approves thereof: Approved of.- Allowed.

We have prepared an abstract of all the receipts and Receipts. payments of the Ballast Office from the first of May, Payment 1713, inclusive, to the first of November, 1715, exclusive, in order to have the city seal affixed to it, that the said abstract may be laid before the Government, as the act of parliament directs: Ordered to be sealed and presented to the Government,- Allowed.

In the first abstract laid before their excellencies the lords justices and council, in the year 1710, it was therein mentioned that the city expended £484 5s. 2 1/2 d. in obtaining the act for the Ballast Office, which was reserved to their further considerations. We desire your honours directions if you think it proper to be mentioned in the abstract now to be laid before the Government and council.’ Ordered: the £484 5s. 2id., to be mentioned in the abstract, to be presented as above, an that the City petition the lords ,justices and council for the allowance thereof to the city out of the Ballast Office.- Allowed.

An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed: All which is humbly submitted to this honourable assembly:
Signed Thomas BOLTON, Mathew PEARSON, Thomas CURTIS, John PORTER, Jos. KANE, Thomas STRINGER, William EMPSON, William ASTON, Edward SURDEVIL

Roll XIXm.36b.

An abstract of, the Ballast Office accounts from the 18th day of January, 1715[16] exclusive, to the 12th day of April, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office, Dr-
To balance of accounts to the 18th January, 1715[-16] inclusive £36 11s. 2d.
To cash received from 18th January, exclusive, to 12th April, inclusive £627 9s. 5d.

Total £664 0s. 7d.

Deduct payments. £557 8s. 10d.
Balance in the Office £106 11s. 9d.
Besides in Messrs. BURTON and HARRISONs hands, as per account £2530 0s. 0d.
Total in cash £2636 11s. 1d.

Per contra. Cred.
By sundry disbursements on the Office account from the 18th January,
1715[-16], exclusive, to the 12th April, inclusive. £557 8s. 10d.

[14.] [Case for advice and opinion of counsel.]
By an act passed in the late queens time for erecting a Ballast Office in the city of Dublin, the Lord Mayor, Sheriffs, commons and citizens of the city of Dublin are constituted keepers and conservators of the port of Dublin. They have made a lease to Sir John ROGERSON of a piece of ground on the south side 0£ the channel, which Sir John Rogerson was obliged to inclose : Sir John Rogerson, in order to carry on the work, has contracted with one VERNON, (of Clontarf, Co. Dublin) to furnish him with stones. Vernon has laid down a great quantity of them on the north side of Sir John Rogersons wall, by Sir Johns directions, as Vernon alleges, and within the channel. Sir John Rogerson has taken what stones he thought were fit for his use, and has left the rest : Vernon alleges that Sir John was to take both small and great stones as they rise out of the quarry, and therefore refuses to remove them, by which means they continue in the channel and area very great nuisance to our shipping.

Query: How is the city to remove them? And whether against Sir John Rogerson or Vernon, or both? or whether the city may not remove them of their own authority without apprehending any law suit from Vernon?

[Opinion:] , Every navigable river is a high road, and any person whatsoever may remove whatsoever is thrown into it that obstructs the passage, and the city may, without all doubt, as conservators of the river and port of Dublin, reform this nuisance, and are obliged to do it, and Vernon, or the persons who throw in the stones, may be proceeded against by indictment or presentment.

But the most expeditious method of proceeding against them is by an act made in the sixth year of the late queen for erecting a Ballast Office, by which any person who has thrown any rubbish into the river, upon conviction upon oath before the Lord Mayor, or any justice of the city or county at large, is to forfeit five shillings to the informer, to be levied by distress and sale of his goods.

m.35.
Though the city may remove the stones, yet the property continues still in sir John Rogerson or Vernon, and though the city may remove them and throw them out of the channel on the banks, yet I am of opinion they cannot hinder those who have the property from taking them again.

I am of opinion that the city have no reason to apprehend any law suit either from Sir John Rogerson or Vernon for removing those Stones, for if there should be any clause in sir Johns lease that he may lay stones for building his walls in the channel of the river, yet they must be removed in convenient time, and not suffered to lye there longer than is absolutely necessary,

Dated and signed: April the 9th, 1716.-Thomas Marlay.(Note : Appointed Chief Justice, King’s Bench, Ireland 1741)

m.35 cont’d

[15.] Alderman Thomas PLEASANTS is elected Lord Mayor for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next.

[16.] Mr. Thomas SOMERVILL and Mr. William EMPSON are elected Sherriffs for the said year, commencing as aforesaid.

[17.]Alderman Thomas PLEASANTS, after his approbation by the Government, applied to the Lord Mayor and aldermen to be excused from undergoing the Mayoralty: he was excused accordingly.22nd May, 1716.

[18.] Alderman Thomas BOLTON is elected Lord Mayor for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next.

[19.] Mr. Thomas SOMERVILLE, having applied to the Lord Mayor and aldermen to be excused from-serving as one of the Sherriffs for the ensuing year, he was excused accordingly.-9th June, 1716.

[20.] Mr. David KING is elected Sherriff for the ensuing year, commencing from Michaelmas next, instead of Mr. Thomas SOMERVILLE

m.38 Admissions to franchise.

m.39
1716. June 9
[I.] Upon the petition of Thomas BULKLEY, clerk, setting forth that the living of Rathdrum, in the county of Wicklow, is become vacant by the removal of Charles WATTS, late incumbent of the said living and praying the city to grant him a presentation to the same under the city seal: ordered that the petitioner have a presentation to the said living under the city seal.

Roll XIX m.39
[2.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that his majesty, with God Almightys assistance, the wisdom of his council, and success of his arms, has seasonably suppressed the late horrid rebellion fomented in Great Britain, and that it is the duty of this city to address his majesty thereon ; that Mr. Recorder has prepared the following address, and pray that the same be the address of this city, and sent to his majesty under the city seal : ordered that the same be the address of this city, and sent to his majestie under the city seal :
“To the kings most excellent majesty:
The humble address of the Lord Mayor, Sherriffs, Commons and citizens of the city of Dublin, at an assembly held at the Tholsell of the said city on the 9th day of June, 1716 :
Most gracious sovereign:
We, your majesties most dutiful and loyal subjects, at this time humbly beg leave to approach your majestie with our hearty and sincere congratulations upon the happy success wherewith it has pleased Almighty God to bless your arms and councils, in suppressing the late horrid and unnatural rebellion in Great Britain, and frustrating the designs of your enemies, well knowing that the natural result of all attempts of this nature, when confounded and extinguished as this has been, must necessarily tend to the more firm establishment of that most just, mild and gracious government which your subjects everywhere enjoy under your majesty.
‘We are thoroughly convinced that all your majesties real interests are our own in the highest degree, and that the extirpation of the Protestant religion, and the subversion of our laws and liberties, must have been the unavoidable consequences of the late horrid attempt, raised and carried on by your majesties traitors and perjured subjects in favour of a Popish pretender, bred up in Romish superstition and arbitrary principles.
And, therefore, we of this city cheerfully lay hold of this opportunity of declaring our utmost detestation and abhorrence of the principles and practices of those of your majesties subject’s, whom neither your majesties goodness and unparalleled clemency can reconcile to your government, nor your power deter from their disloyalty, and do most humbly assure your majestie, with the profoundest sincerity, that we are ready to sacrifice our lives and our all in defence of your sacred person, which is so justly dear to us, and in support of your rightful and lawful title to the imperial throne of your ancestors, and of the succession in your royal house.
‘May all your majesties open and secret enemies, as well abroad as at home, be timely discovered, and all their projects and wicked devices against your majestie be brought to shame and confusion, while we shall ever rejoyce and glory in being ranked among the most dutiful, loyal and obedient of your majesties subjects :
‘In testimony whereof we have caused the common seal of the said city to be hereunto affixed.’

1716. July 20.- Fourth Friday after 24 June. (m. 42)
[1.] Certain of the commons setting forth that, for the honour of the city of Dublin, some more distinguishing mark of the citys favour should be placed on their late worthy Recorder (John FORSTER) than was formerly granted him, who, by his abilities, vigilance and steady adherence to the true interest of this city, was highly instrumental in preserving its liberties, to the neglect of his private affairs, and the considerable detriment of his own fortune; that in Christmas assembly, 1714, there was an order for five hundred pounds to be paid by him, which as yet he has not received, and therefore pray he may be rewarded in some other manner as most becoming the honour and dignity of this city, and the eminent services by him performed in defending the rights thereof : whereupon it is ordered as followeth: whereas by an (Roll xix.) act of assembly, of Christmas, 1714, it was ordered that the late Recorder, in consideration of his having faithfully stood by the rights and liberties of this city in times of extream danger, should be paid the sum of five hundred pounds sterling, as an acknowledgement of such his services, which sum has not as yet been paid him ; and certain of the Commons having this assembly prayed that he may be rewarded in some other manner for the same: it is therefore ordered that the said order as to the five hundred pounds be and is hereby discharged, and that in lieu thereof fifty pounds per annum of the rent payable by him to the city out of the lands of Dunakerny be remitted to the said late Recorder, the present lord chief justice Forster, during the remainder of the term his lordship has therein, from Michaelmas next ensuing.

[2.]On the petition of alderman Edward SURDEVILLE’s and Mrs. BRADSHAW, widow of Thomas BRADSHAW, alderman, deceased, setting forth that in the year 1703 the lower part of the Old Crane in Winetavern street was set by the city for fifty one years at fifteen pounds per annum, to be paid the Sherriffs of this city, and successors, at Michaelmas and Easter, and capons or five shillings, to the Lord Mayor, with clause of distress and re-entry; that petitioner served from Michaelmas, 1712, to Michaelmas, 1713, and thereby [is] intituled to a years rent, being fifteen pounds, but could not get the same from RYDER, Who lately held the Crane, nor JONES, who now has it, and therefore pray relief by the citys compelling RYDER or JONES to pay them, or by distress or re-entry, and by allowing them the rent for the year commencing 1713: ordered that the contents of the petition relating to the weigh house be referred to Mr.Recorder, to order such proper measures for recovery of the rent thereof as he shall think fit, and that the petitioner be impowered to receive all the Sherriffs rents that fell due for the year commencing Michaelmas, 1713.

[3.] On the petition of Samuel FAIRBROTHER, printer setting forth that the report and proceedings in relation (Roll xix. M 42b) to the election of magistrates for the city of Dublin, which was reported the 6th of June, 1716, in the house of commons, are now in the press, and he appointed to print the same, and prays incouragement from the city to so good a work: ordered that the petitioner be paid for two hundred of the reports (when finished) for each a British half crown, the same to be allowed the treasurer on his account, and that the said reports be distributed to the Lord Mayor, Sherriffs and Commons, and one to each corporation.

[4.] On a former petition of Joseph TININSON, setting City lights forth that he has been concerned in the city lights five years past; that he has faithfully discharged his office and has been a loser, by reason of the great rate oil bore and the frequent damage sustained by the breaking his lamps; that he is desirous to continue the said imploy, having oil mills of his own, which petition was referred to a committee, who made the following report :
We, the committee appointed to inquire about the city lights, are of opinion that Mr. Joseph TININSON is fit and proper person to be concerned in the management of the city lights for one year; that the same number of lights be continued as required by the act ; that four hundred of the lamps be glazed this year with glass. French or white glass by said TININSON ; that he begins to light on the 15th of September, -and continue to the 13th of April; that he begins to light each dark night at five o’clock, so as the light continues till one; that one light be placed at each end of the four bridges, and one in the middle of the same, to continue burning all night; that where there are dead walls and no houses built, the lights to be placed at the same distance as the act directs in the streets, and at the end of the said year all the lamps be delivered up by said Tininson, glazed as aforesaid, pursuant to the statute. And the said TININSON having now petitioned to have (m..41) the same report made an act of assembly, it is ordered accordingly, and that the lights and utensils be delivered up to the city next May, if they shall think proper, and that he shall enter into articles to perform the agreement in the report mentioned, as Mr. Recorder shall advise, the said Tininson receiving such profits for the same as are allowed by the statute in that case made and provided.

[5.] Upon a report of the standing committee for Stephens Green, and petition of certain of the commons to make the same an act of assembly: ordered that gravel be dug for the north walk when the season offers, and that Robert BELFORD oversees the work of the Green, the Green keepers to receive their orders from him, and he to provide such trees as are wanting, first giving my Lord Mayor notice from time to time, and that Mr. William DOBSON be on the said committee a commoner, in the room of Mr. Alderman SURDEVILLE.’

[6.] Rowland PARKER, Gilbert KELLY, Matthew BOWEN and Richard WEST, city adjutants, setting forth that by reason of their constant attendance in disciplining the city militia, they cannot mind their own private affairs, and praying a salary or further gratuity: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay to the petitioners twenty pounds, sterling; five-pounds to each, and the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[7.] On the petition of Joseph PARSONS, setting forth that he is a freeman, and reduced to extreme poverty, having a wife and four children in a perishing condition, and prays relief and the citys charity: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner ten pounds towards his relief, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[8.] On petition of certain of the commons to enlarge the assembly: ordered the same be enlarged to nine o’clock.

Roll xix m. 41
[9.] On the petition of William BAYLY, praying a further consideration and gratuity for past services: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the petitioner twenty pounds, sterling, in consideration of his past services, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[10.] John DRAYCOTT, setting forth that he is a free-man and an attorney in the exchequer, and prays to be admitted an attorney of the Tholsel court: granted during the citys pleasure.

[11.] John WALSH, setting forth that he is a freeman and an attorney in the kings bench, and prays to be admitted an attorney of the Tholsel court of this city: granted during the citys pleasure.

[12.]The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 20th of July, 1716 :( m 41b)
‘That since the last assembly the ground on the south side the channel below Ringsend is staked out, according to the opinion of several merchants, and others skilled in the seafaring trade, in order to be piled; that one engine is sent for to Holland, another making here ; that as soon as they are ready, shall go on with driving the piles, according to the said opinions; that a man is sent for to Holland that shall be skilled in pileing, making of banks, and to have the overseeing and direction of the said work :’ ordered to proceed; the assembly agreeing to this paragraph.
‘That the kishes on the north side the channel are. now brought up to the land, as far as it is thought necessary, and will be so strong, when backed and finished, , as may prevent the floods from breaking through to the northward for the future, and keep the current in its right channel : the like order.
‘That the gabbards belonging to the Office being rather too few in number to carry on the several works now going on, and to supply the necessary occasions of the Office, have built a large float, carrying forty tuns at least, and cost £112 14s., to bring stones, etc., to the said works, or be otherwise imployed, as the directors shall think proper:’ ordered as before.

Roll xix, m. 41 b.
‘That the collecting the annual. rents due to the Ballast Office from gabbards, wherrys and boats, meets with difficulty, the arrear considerable and increase yearly for want of full power by the act to recover the same; and the city, having a power to make by laws by the said act, as they shall think fit and necessary for the good government of the said Office, propose that a by law be made, as Mr. Recorder shall advise, to oblige owners of gabbards, etc., that ply in the river to pay their rents more punctually than hitherto they have done :’ Ordered that Mr. Recorder be applyed to draw such by law as shall be proper.

Mr. Alderman SURDEVILLE continued one of the directors, as an alderman, and Mr. Peter Verdoen in his room as a commoner.

An abstract of the cash now in the Office is hereunto annexed, and humbly submitted to this honorable assembly :
‘Thomas BOLTON.- Mathew PEARSON.-Thomas CURTIS.- Edward SURDEVILLE.- John PORTER -William ASTON – Joseph KANE – Henry GLEGG – William EMPSON:

m. 40
An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts, from the 12th of April, 1716, exclusive, to the l0th of July, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office Dr.
To balance of accounts from 12th April 1716, inclusive £107 1s 9d
To cash received from the 12th April exclusive to 19th July 1716 inclusive… £1035 17s. 5d.
Total: £1142 19s. 2d
Deduct: £1093 7s. 10 1/2 d.

Balance in Office : £49 11s. 3 1/2 d.

Besides in Messrs Burton & Harrisons hands, as per account: £2133 16s. 8d.

Total: £2188 7 s. 11 1/2 d.

Per Contra
By sundry disbursements on the Office Account, from 12th April 1716, exclusive to 19th July 1716, inclusive £840 5s. 5 1/2 d.

By money expended in building the new city wall between Sir John Rogersons ground and Mr. Mercers, as per account £253 2s. 5d.
Total: £1093 7s. 10 1/2 d.
m. 46 con’t
[12.] On the petition of Daniel COOKE, gentleman, setting forth that the piece of ground on the Blind Key, whereon are three old houses formerly leased by the city of Dublin to Richard PROUDFOOT, is now by mesne assignment come to the petitioner, which lease being near expired and the aforesaid houses being very much out of repair, and ruinous and old, that he is desirous to become tenant to the city for the same after the expiration of the present lease, and prays a lease of the premises, which petition was referred to a committee, who made the following report : Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly to us directed, we have viewed and surveyed the within preinises and do find that the same contain in front to the Blind Key seventy-two foot, fronting the river seventy-six foot, on the west end forty-eight foot, and on the east end forty-seven foot, and we are of opinion that the within petitioner have a lease of the said premises, he leaving out nine foot of the forty-eight in breadth backwards towards the key next the river Liffy, whenever he rebuilds the aforesaid premises, which will make the said key in all twenty-five foot broad, as may appear by the annexed survey, for the term of ninety and nine years, to commence from Michaelmas, 1722, being the expiration of the old lease, at the yearly rent of fifteen pounds four shillings, and capons to the Lord Mayor, the rent to be paid half-yearly, at every Easter and every Michaelmas, to the treasurer for the citys use, and paying ten shillings on perfection of the lease for the use of the Poor House.’
Ordered that the petitioner have a lease of the premises within mentioned, pursuant the committees report, with such clauses as Mr. Recorder shall advise. Leases to be perfected next assembly.
[13.] Certain of the commons, having petitioned and set forth that the committee appointed to inspect into the hide markets, and to find out a proper place for selling hides, have made the following report, and pray the same may be made an act of assembly, videlicet :
‘Pursuant to your honours order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inquire for convenient places for hide markets, are of opinion that where the potatoes are now frequently sold on the. Key near Ormonde Bridge will be a fit place for a hide market, and that it may be made in length and breadth so large as can conveniently, to be inclosed by a, wall of (Roll xix m 45.) seven foot high next the street, and the wall next the river to be raised to the same height; that the market be flagged and a conveniency made to carry off the water, the slip to be made up, and that posts and rails with tenter hooks may be placed within the yard, in such manner as will contain the hides of the markets; that a pump be fixed in the yard, and doors and gates be placed therein. We have also examined Thomas street for a proper place to make a hide market, and find the most convenient place for that purpose is the back of the Glibb-water, and that rails and other necessarys be placed along the butchers stalls in the city side, from the sign of the Butchers Arms as far as shall be found necessary for hanging the hides, the care of the said hide markets to be committed to the charge of some proper persons; and, to defray the expence in making the said Markets, and imploying men to attend them, that butchers and all owners of hides do pay one halfpenny per hide for lodging and selling the same in the said Markets, to be paid for the use of the city to the treasurer :Ordered that the said committee be continued, and that a hide market be built on Ormonde key, as mentioned in the said report, and that the said committee see the said work done.

[14.] John OATES and Henry THOMAS, having formerly petitioned that there has been appointed a standing committee for fire, to reward the petitioners and others serviceable in extinguishing fires in this city, therefore prayed the said committee might be revived, Upon which a committee was appointed, who made the following report, videlicet :
‘We, the standing committee appointed to reward such persons as shall be serviceable in extinguishing fire, do find that there are several buckets lost and wanting, as also other necessary materials. We are of opinion that what old buckets there are be immediately repaired, and that fifty new buckets be forthwith made, four shovels and two pickaxes :’ Ordered, according to the said report, and that the materials therein mentioned be bought by the treasurer and the old buckets repaired, the expence thereof to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[15.] The report of the directors for the Ballast Office to the generaL assembly of the 19th of October, 1716:
That we have made some progress in pileing below Ringsend with an engine made here, and do intend to continue that work so long as the season will permit : ordered that the committee do proceed;
And we design to provide materials for pileing on the South Bull early the next spring; it being the opinion of several skilful men that we should go on with that part of the work first, in order, as well as we can, to preserve the ships that are most exposed to storms: ordered accordingly.
We find it difficult to be supplied with oak, which we hope to compass; the fir we can readily be supplied with, and at cheaper rates than the oak :’ Ordered that the committee do provide timber as they shall think proper, and proceed.
We are building a second float of about thirty tuns, the former not being sufficient for the office business, and are going on in laying kishes on the north side of the channel and backing them, in order to prevent the floods overflowing that way :’ Ordered to proceed.
‘In our last we reported that we had sent to Holland for an engine to drive down the piles with; and for a man skilled in piling, etc. ; in answer to which we have an account that the engine is shipped and daily expected here, and that a man so skilled is not willing to come alone without a second, and must have six pounds per month wages and eight shillings per week board wages, for himself; and five pounds per month wages and six shillings per week board wages for his second, as per (Roll xix m. 44) letter, which amounts to one hundred and sixty eight pounds eight shillings per year for them both :’
Respite this paragraph as to the sending for the men till next assembly.
We are of opinion that their demands are very high, and that one of them would be sufficient to direct our people here, and that next spring will be soon enough for his coming over, if we can get one to come: respite this also. ,

An abstract of the cash now in the office is hereunto annexed :
All which is humbly submitted to your honors :
Thomas BOLTON – Mathew PEARSON -Thomas CURTIS. – Edward SURDEVILLE – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William EMPSON -Thomas STRINGER – William ASTON – Henry GLEGG -19th October, 1716; ,
Ordered that alderman Porter and alderman Somerville be continued on the said committee as aldermen, and that the commons name four commoners :-James King, senior, William Maple, Perceval Hunt, Philip Cooley.

An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 19th of July, 1716, exclusive, to the 18th of October, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office. Dr.
To balance of accounts to the 9th July 1716, inclusive: £49 11s. 3 1/2 d.
To cash received from the 19th July 1716 to the 18th )ct0ber 1716, inclusive: £1457 11s. 8d.

Total : £1507 0s. 11 1/2 d.
Decuct: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Balance in the Office £22 2s. 5d.

Besides in Mssrs Burtons and Harrisons hands as per account: £1600 5s. 5d.

Total in Cash: £1622 2s. 5d.

Per Contra
By sundry disbursements on the office accounts, from 19th July 1716 exclusive to 18th October 1716 inclusive: £1094 14s. 11d.
Expended towards carrying on the city wall, as per account: £390 5s. 7 1/2 d.

Total: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Franchise. Admissions to franchise. m.47.

[12.] On the petition of Daniel COOKE, gentleman, setting forth that the piece of ground on the Blind Key, whereon are three old houses formerly leased by the city of Dublin to Richard PROUDFOOT, is now by mesne assignment come to the petitioner, which lease being near expired and the aforesaid houses being very much out of repair, and ruinous and old, that he is desirous to become tenant to the city for the same after the expiration of the present lease, and prays a lease of the premises, which petition was referred to a committee, who made the following report : Pursuant to your honors order of the last assembly to us directed, we have viewed and surveyed the within preinises and do find that the same contain in front to the Blind Key seventy-two foot, fronting the river seventy-six foot, on the west end forty-eight foot, and on the east end forty-seven foot, and we are of opinion that the within petitioner have a lease of the said premises, he leaving out nine foot of the forty-eight in breadth backwards towards the key next the river Liffy, whenever he rebuilds the aforesaid premises, which will make the said key in all twenty-five foot broad, as may appear by the annexed survey, for the term of ninety and nine years, to commence from Michaelmas, 1722, being the expiration of the old lease, at the yearly rent of fifteen pounds four shillings, and capons to the Lord Mayor, the rent to be paid half-yearly, at every Easter and every Michaelmas, to the treasurer for the citys use, and paying ten shillings on perfection of the lease for the use of the Poor House.’
Ordered that the petitioner have a lease of the premises within mentioned, pursuant the committees report, with such clauses as Mr. Recorder shall advise. Leases to be perfected next assembly.

[13.] Certain of the commons, having petitioned and set forth that the committee appointed to inspect into the hide markets, and to find out a proper place for selling hides, have made the following report, and pray the same may be made an act of assembly, videlicet :
‘Pursuant to your honours order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inquire for convenient places for hide markets, are of opinion that where the potatoes are now frequently sold on the. Key near Ormonde Bridge will be a fit place for a hide market, and that it may be made in length and breadth so large as can conveniently, to be inclosed by a, wall of (Roll xix m 45.) seven foot high next the street, and the wall next the river to be raised to the same height; that the market be flagged and a conveniency made to carry off the water, the slip to be made up, and that posts and rails with tenter hooks may be placed within the yard, in such manner as will contain the hides of the markets; that a pump be fixed in the yard, and doors and gates be placed therein. We have also examined Thomas street for a proper place to make a hide market, and find the most convenient place for that purpose is the back of the Glibb-water, and that rails and other necessarys be placed along the butchers stalls in the city side, from the sign of the Butchers Arms as far as shall be found necessary for hanging the hides, the care of the said hide markets to be committed to the charge of some proper persons; and, to defray the expence in making the said Markets, and imploying men to attend them, that butchers and all owners of hides do pay one halfpenny per hide for lodging and selling the same in the said Markets, to be paid for the use of the city to the treasurer :Ordered that the said committee be continued, and that a hide market be built on Ormonde key, as mentioned in the said report, and that the said committee see the said work done.

[14.] John OATES and Henry THOMAS, having formerly petitioned that there has been appointed a standing committee for fire, to reward the petitioners and others serviceable in extinguishing fires in this city, therefore prayed the said committee might be revived, Upon which a committee was appointed, who made the following report, videlicet :
‘We, the standing committee appointed to reward such persons as shall be serviceable in extinguishing fire, do find that there are several buckets lost and wanting, as also other necessary materials. We are of opinion that what old buckets there are be immediately repaired, and that fifty new buckets be forthwith made, four shovels and two pickaxes :’ Ordered, according to the said report, and that the materials therein mentioned be bought by the treasurer and the old buckets repaired, the expence thereof to be allowed the treasurer on his accounts.

[15.] The report of the directors for the Ballast Office to the generaL assembly of the 19th of October, 1716:
That we have made some progress in pileing below Ringsend with an engine made here, and do intend to continue that work so long as the season will permit : ordered that the committee do proceed;
And we design to provide materials for pileing on the South Bull early the next spring; it being the opinion of several skilful men that we should go on with that part of the work first, in order, as well as we can, to preserve the ships that are most exposed to storms: ordered accordingly.
We find it difficult to be supplied with oak, which we hope to compass; the fir we can readily be supplied with, and at cheaper rates than the oak :’ Ordered that the committee do provide timber as they shall think proper, and proceed.
We are building a second float of about thirty tuns, the former not being sufficient for the office business, and are going on in laying kishes on the north side of the channel and backing them, in order to prevent the floods overflowing that way :’ Ordered to proceed.
‘In our last we reported that we had sent to Holland for an engine to drive down the piles with; and for a man skilled in piling, etc. ; in answer to which we have an account that the engine is shipped and daily expected here, and that a man so skilled is not willing to come alone without a second, and must have six pounds per month wages and eight shillings per week board wages, for himself; and five pounds per month wages and six shillings per week board wages for his second, as per (Roll xix m. 44) letter, which amounts to one hundred and sixty eight pounds eight shillings per year for them both :’
Respite this paragraph as to the sending for the men till next assembly.
We are of opinion that their demands are very high, and that one of them would be sufficient to direct our people here, and that next spring will be soon enough for his coming over, if we can get one to come: respite this also. ,

An abstract of the cash now in the office is hereunto annexed :
All which is humbly submitted to your honors :
Thomas BOLTON – Mathew PEARSON -Thomas CURTIS. – Edward SURDEVILLE – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William EMPSON -Thomas STRINGER – William ASTON – Henry GLEGG -19th October, 1716; ,

Ordered that alderman Porter and alderman Somerville be continued on the said committee as aldermen, and that the commons name four commoners :-James King, senior, William Maple, Perceval Hunt, Philip Cooley.

An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 19th of July, 1716, exclusive, to the 18th of October, 1716, inclusive :

Ballast Office. Dr.
To balance of accounts to the 9th July 1716, inclusive: £49 11s. 3 1/2 d.
To cash received from the 19th July 1716 to the 18th )ct0ber 1716, inclusive: £1457 11s. 8d.

Total : £1507 0s. 11 1/2 d.
Decuct: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Balance in the Office £22 2s. 5d.

Besides in Mssrs Burtons and Harrisons hands as per account: £1600 5s. 5d.

Total in Cash: £1622 2s. 5d.

Per Contra
By sundry disbursements on the office accounts, from 19th July 1716 exclusive to 18th October 1716 inclusive: £1094 14s. 11d.
Expended towards carrying on the city wall, as per account: £390 5s. 7 1/2 d.

Total: £1485 0s. 6 1/2 d.

Franchise. Admissions to franchise. m.47.

(Roll xix. M. 50)
1716-17. January 18.- Fourth Friday after Christmas. 1716:

[1.] George WALTON, city Marshal, having petitioned and set forth that the committee to whom the plan and estimate for building a marshalsea on the Merchants Keay were referred, had made the following report, and praying to have the same confirmed and made an act of assembly: ‘ Pursuant to your honours order of last assembly to us directed, we, the within committee, are of opinion that the plan hereunto annexed be the plan or ground plot for the building of a marshalsea on the Merchants Keay ; that the work and buildings be carried on with all convenient speed, and that the said building, with all the materials that will be used therein, to be provided at the citys charge, and that Mr. Richard MILLS do oversee the said work to be ‘done accordingly :ordered that the said report be made an act of assembly, and that the work be carried on with all convenient speed. ,

[2.] Auditors of the city accounts for the last year: Lord Mayor and Sherriffs, Alderman STOYTE, Sir John ROGERSON, Aldermen QUIN, BURTON, BARKEY, Mathew PEARSON, QUAYLE, CURTIS, SURDEVILLE, and eighteen of the commons, to be named by the commons, or any nine of them, whereof the Lord Mayor and one of the Sherriffs to be always two, are appointed auditors of the city accounts for the last year :
[Eighteen of the commons :] Joseph KANE, William DOBSON, Humphry FRENCH, William ALDRICH, Thomas STANFORD, William MAPLE, Henry GLEGG, William ASTON, James SOMERVILLE, Richard WALSH, John REYSON, John WRIGHT, Robert JACKSON, Christopher INCH, Vincent KIDDER, Jeremiah PEPPYAT, Philip COOLEY, Edward DUDGEON.

[3] Alderman John PORTER and Mr. John TISDALL, late Sherriffs, are appointed masters of the city works for the ensuing year.

[4.] John THOMSON, gentleman, and attorney of his majesties court of kings bench, praying to be admitted a city attorney: granted during the citys pleasure.

[5.] Certain of the commons, setting forth that Captain COPE’S house in Dawson Street having been several times attempted in a most outragious manner by thieves with fire-arms, as, by examination given into the lords justices and council, who have been pleased to (Roll xix m. 50 b) declare they shall be ready ,to issue a proclamation with a pardon and such reward as this honorable board shall think fit to offer on that account, and praying that this assembly would take the same into consideration, that a violence so uncommon and impudent in this great city be not suffered to pass with but due regard, but that such reward may be offered as in all probability may discover the actors of this particular villainy, and prove a terror to all who shall be so audacious to attempt the like disturbances for the future: it is thereupon ordered that the Lord Mayor and Sherriffs do wait on the Government and acquaint them that the city will give twenty pounds reward to any person that shall discover the persons that attempted to rob captain Copes house [named] in the within petition, so that such persons be convict of the said fact, which twenty pounds is ordered to be paid by the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, to the discoverer, on conviction of the offenders, and the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

m.50 con’t

[6.] On the petition of Jeremiah PEPPAYAT, setting forth that the committee to whom the contents of his petition were referred have made the following report in relation to the settling of prices and rates on such work as he does for the use of the city, as he is city printer, and prays the same may be made an act of this assembly: ‘Pursuant to your hnours order of the last assembly to us directed, we, the committee appointed to inspect into the contents of Mr. Peppyat, city stationer and printers petition, have viewed his account, which is hereunto annexed, and are of opinion that he be paid in full of the said account, thirty four pounds, four shillings and seven pence, sterling. We have also considered of the prices that he may reasonably charge for the future for such work as he shall do for the citys use, which are as follows :-

For every hundred assize of bread, being the number to be printed at one time £0 10s. 0d.
For every hundred proclamations for regulating pavements, being two sheets £1 5s.
For every hundred proclamations for regulating watches, being two sheets £1. 5s.
For every hundred proclamations for keeping the Sabbath, one sheet £0 12s. 6d.
For every hundred. proclamations relating to carrs, carts, etc., one sheet £0 12s. 6d
For every hundred proclamations relating to beggars, one sheet £0 12s. 6d.
For every hundred proclamations for May day, one sheet £0 12s. 6d.
For every hundred advertisements relating to scavengers, folio £0 4s. 0d
For every hundred advertisements relating to scavengers, quarto £0 2s. 0d
For every thousand pipe water receipts £0 15s. 0d
For every hundred orders of committee for pipe water £0 6s. 3d.
For every hundred presentments of grand jury £0 12s. 6d
For every hundred warrants on ditto. £0 6s. 3d
Where there are but 50 proclamations printed and one sheet to be allowed
for each proclamation. £0 0s. 2d.

(Roll xix m. 50b) It is thereupon ordered that the report be confirmed, and that the treasurer do pay to the petitioner the money that is in the within report mentioned, the same to be allowed him in his accounts.”

[7.] On the petition of Samuel JOHN, setting forth that he is the only surviving son of Mr. Isaac JOHN, late of the city of Dublin, goldsmith, who had the honour to serve in the office of one of the Sherriffs of this city who by will bequeathed twenty pounds to the Blue boys Hospital; that by misfortunes of his own and others he has been for a long time in confinement for debt till lately released by the act for the relief of insolvent debtors, and therefore prays the citys charity: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the within petitioner six pounds, sterling, the same to be allowed him on his accounts.

[8.] On the petition of Joseph HARPER, setting forth that he has attended this honorable city in the place and imployment of Conn MATHEWS, ever since his misfortune, and therefore prays the citys consideration for such his services: ordered that the treasurer, on the Lord Mayors warrant, do pay the above petitioner ten pounds, sterling, to be allowed the same on account.

[9.] Certain of the Commons, praying to enlarge the assembly: ordered that the assembly be enlarged till nine o’clock.

[10.] On the petition of Elizabeth TAYLOR, widow, praying to be admitted one of the city widows in the room of her mother, Catherine COSGRAVE, deceased: ordered that the petitioner be admitted one of the city poor widows at the usual allowance during the citys pleasure.

[11] Jacob PEPPARD, esquire, town clerk, setting forth that he pays one hundred pound per annum for the Tholsell office, and since July, 1703, hath paid eight hundred and fifty pounds rent of said office, which sum, with the abatement of one hundred and fifty pounds, the city was pleased to allow the petitioner for his trouble and loss on two former acts of parliament for discharging insolvent debtors without fees, and with the like allowance of one hundred and fifty pounds, sterling, for the time the said office was shut up by reason of the late distractions in the city, clears all the rents payable out of the said office to the city, excepting two years ending January instant; that in order wholly to apply himself to the business of this city he quitted his other offices and business, and for his zeal in the citys service during the late unhappy contest he underwent many personal indignities and great disquiet of mind, having many severe orders sent him by those men in power to terrifie the petitioner from his faithful discharge of his duty to the city; that the petitioner, during the year and a halfes unhappy dispute in the city was deprived of all gain and profit by his said office, and for so long lost his usual subsistence and has had no allowance or consideration from this honourable city for himself and two clerks, who during the said dispute were constantly imployed and paid an uncommon attendance on that occasion: that the petitioner has lately discharged many prisoners on the last act of grace without fee or reward, which lessens much the profits of the said office, and therefore prayed that his case may be taken into consideration, and such abatement and allowance made as the honorable assembly shall think fit: it is thereupon.ordered that the within petitioner be remitted the two years rent due by him to the city for the Tholsell office, and that he apply no more for himselfe or his clerks.

[12.] The report of the committee of directors for the Ballast Office to the general assembly of the 18th of January, 1716[17] :

That we have continued pileing below Ringsend as long as the seas would permit, and have finished some. small part of what was designed to be piled, and hope in time it may answer the ends proposed by it : ordered to proceed.

That we intend next spring:, if your honours think fit, to go on with the pileing on the South Bull, according to our last report; have some oak timber by us towards carrying on the said work, fit for the second, third and fourth row of the said piles, but shall want for the first row, which must be oak, and a longer length than what we already have :’ ordered to proceed.
The second float, mentioned in our last to be then building, is now finished and at work
We have carried the kishes as far westward on the north side of the river as we designed them, and likewise as high at that end, being three rows, and have filled them with stones, and are now backing them, and do design to continue laying kishes to the same height eastward on the said river side :’ ordered to proceed.
The engine from Holland, mentioned in our last, we have received and tried, and do find it much more chargeable in working than was expected, neither is it capable of driving piles of a length sufficient for Cock lake and the said South Bull; but there is one Wilks, a smith, who proposes to make an engine which he says will drive the longest pile which the office will have occasion to drive, with half the number of hands which the Dutch engine requires and with more expedition, of which they have made a model which has been seen by my Lord Mayor and others ,and several of them do approve of it; but the price demanded for it being fifty pounds, sterling, we would not order the building or making of it without your honours approbation thereof and directions therein: ordered that the engine be made as the committee shall direct.

‘We having seen the working of the engine from Holland, and being pretty well acquainted with the engine that is offered to be made, we are of opinion that our workmen here are capable of driving the piles Dub without assistance from Holland.

‘We have neither kishes nor hurdles by us to go on with the said works, so that the charge of furnishing them and the long timber for the said piles, the great quantity of stones, both for the said piles and filling the said kishes, together with backing them, and the other great expences of the said office the next summer, will far surmount the produce of the same, and the most part of the fund of cash which we had beforehand being already laid out, as may appear by the office accounts and abstract of the office cash, we fear we shall not be able for want of cash to go on with the said work next summer unless the city will please to assist us, which we hope they will do, and that the rather because the said office has, by their directions and for their use expended on the city wan on the north side of Lazy Hill £693 16s. 1d., sterling, of the said office cash, as may appear by vouchers and certificates:’ ordered to go on with the work as money comes in.

‘We do humbly conceive that if the cash book of the Ballast Office was closed at the making the report to be delivered to the assembly, it would be much easier from time to time to examine the said cash book than it is at present, which is closed every quarter, ending the lst May, August, November and February, yearly: ‘ ordered that this be referred to the committee.

‘An abstract of the cash now in the office is here unto annexed :

All which is humbly submitted to this honorable assembly: Mathew PEARSON – Thomas CURTIS – John PORTER -Thomas SOMERVILLE – William EMPSON – Peter VERDON – Philip COOLEY – William ASTON – William MAPLE – Thomas STRINGER – Percivall HUNT – Henry GLEGG -James KING’

Roll xix, m. 48
An abstract of the Ballast Office accounts from the 18th October, 1716 inclusive to the 17th January 1716(17) exclusive.
Ballast Office Dr.
To balance of account to 18th October, 1716 inclusive: £22. 2s. 5d.
To cash received from ships etc., from the 18th October, 1716 exclusive to 17th January, 1716[17], inclusive: £535 2s. 1d.
To cash received from Messrs Burton & Harrison : £900 0s. 0d.
Total: £1457 4s. 6d.
Deduct: £1445 0s. 6 1/2 d.
Balances in the Office £12.3s. 11 1/2 d

Besides in Messrs Burton & Harrisons hands: £700 0s 0d

Total in cash: £712 3s. 11 1/2 d

Due to Sundry Persons from the Office: £212 6s. 10 1/2 d

Remains: £499 17s. 1 1/2d.

Per Contra Cr.
By cash paid sundry disbursements from 18th October 1716, exclusive to 17th January 1716 (17) inclusive: £1103 18s. 7 1/2 d
By cas disbursed for the city, from 18th October 1716 exclusive to 17th January 1716 (17) inclusive: £341 1s. 11 d.

Total: £1,445 0s. 6 1/2 d

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