Category Archives: Irish Genealogy

Irish Roman Catholic Parish Records

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I was talking to a friend on New Years Eve and I asked him about the Roman Catholic Parish records that the National Library of Ireland are going to put online in the Summer of 2015.

2 pages of a Roman Catholic parish register

2 pages of a Roman Catholic parish register

“Who is transcribing these records?” I asked,
“Is it going to be anything like the census returns where people who are not Irish are trying to read the records?”

“Ah no, Jane” replies my friend, ‘They are scanning the record microfilms and going to put them online”

“What?” ses I, “You’re joking”

People who are not familiar with Irish Roman Catholic parish records have this notion that all records were maintained methodically, they think we have the full names of the parents listed in baptismal records, that the maiden name of the mother is given, that we have the address of the parents, they think that all this information is given in our parish records – *but* – they are wrong.

I’m going to show you some photographs of parish records as we see them when we are reviewing the microfilms – a picture speaks a thousand words as my supervisor used to say when I was working on my PhD., so these images can speak their own story.

Believe it or not, the image that you see here ‘Parish record 3’ is a copy of am actual page in a microfilm  of parish records.  These images above are what we see when looking at microfilms of parish records. The ink can be very very faded, impossible to read.  Bits can be missing.  Searching through records, finding information is not an easy task.  I go to records now which I have worked on in the past and sometimes I read words differently than the way I did before.  Reading these records can depend on your experience.

These next three images just show you the same as before.  You can see the differences in the script, the way the records are laid out and I guess that’s all I really wanted to show you.  Yes, the flash from my phone is shining on the images but that does not change what we are looking at.  Yes, there are means of making it easier to read the writing on these pages when you are sitting at a microfilm reader but I am not getting in to that here.

There are approximately 1,161 sets of microfilms of Roman Catholic Parish records to go online in the Summer of 2015.  I’ve taken a quick look through the index I have of parish records and picked out the oldest set of records for each county.I’m putting this list on this page.  If you want to see what other records exist for the county you are interested in, then go to that county page on this website and I may have a full list of the Roman Catholic parish records for that county on that page.

Best of luck to you all

The oldest set of Roman Catholic parish records for each county in Ireland run as follows

Antrim: 1821
Armagh : 1796
Carow 1763
Cavan 1752
Clare 1802
Cork South West 1788
Cork East 1748
Cork North west 1803
Derry 1822
Donegal 1773
Down 1785
Dublin 1726
Fermanagh 1836
Galway East 1804
Gawlway West 1690 (9 months only) goes to 1723 then
Kerry 1782
Kildare 1771
Kilkenny 1754
Laois (Queen’s Co) 1765
Leitrm 1820
Limerick East 1745
Limerick West 1776
Longford 1779
Louth 1744
Mayo 1823
Meath 1742
Monaghan 1835
Offaly (King’s Co) 1795
Roscommon 1793
Sligo 1796
Tipperary South 1742
Tipperary North 1792
Tyrone 1783
Waterford 1706
Westmeath 1741
Wexford 1671
Wicklow 1743

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Eighteenth-Century Funerals in Ireland

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There are, possibly, few of us who, making an early and painful acquaintance with Poetry, did not have to memorise these lines by the Rev. Charles Wolfe, descriptive of the burial of Sir John Moore after the battle of Corunna on 13th January, 1809 :

We buried him darkly at dead of night,
The sod with our bayonets turning;
By the struggling moonbeam’s misty light,
And the lantern dimly burning.

Privately, we probably thought the “dead of night” and the “lantern” were part of the usual melodrama beloved by poets. To-day’s youth would accept them merely as part of an elementary “black-out” so much have we advanced on the paths of civilisation. Actually, though the burial took place early in the 19th century, it was merely carrying on a practice common in the 18th. Burial at night was, in fact, quite the customary thing. Richard Helsham, a celebrated Dublin physician, gave directions in his will, made in 1738, that he was to be buried at night, with only one attendant, bearing a taper, to be present.  Miss Grizel Steevens too, in her will, made in 1740, directed that she should be buried late at night in St. Peter’s Church. In point of fact, she was buried in Steeven’s Hospital, and not once only, but three times.(1) Dr. Kirkpatrick suggests that it was customary to exhume and rebury a coffin after the lapse of a week, and he proffers a rather unsavoury theory for this practice, though quite possibly it was to make sure that the body-snatchers had not been at work. In the case of” Madame Steevens,” the third interment took place when her remains were removed for burial in the Hospital Chapel.

The Flying Post of 13th March, 1733, gives a description of one of these night interments: “On Friday night last the late Chief Justice Doyne was interred in St. Nicholas’ Church, in a very private, though decent manner, his hearse being adorned with black plumes and velvet pall, and his bearers, who were some of the chief men in our Kingdom, with the attendants, wearing fine linen scarves and cambric hatbands.”

These scarves and hatbands, which are still worn in some country parts of Ireland, are also recorded as having been worn at the funeral in 17302 of a nephew of Dr. William King, Protestant Archbishop of Dublin. The scarves were described as being of Irish holland, and the hatbands of Irish cambric. Four years later, the cause of Irish industry was further allied to funerals by a law which stipulated that after 1st August, 1734, no corpse was to be buried in any garment made of or mingled with flax, hemp, silk, hair, gold or silver, or in any stuff or thing other than that made of sheep or lamb’s wool, nor was the coffin to be lined with anything save the same materials.3 The object was to encourage the woollen trade, and merely put into operation in Ireland a provision which had existed under English legislation since 1666.4 This enactment was repealed in 1814, but had fallen into disuse many years before; In fact, those who objected to the law (and they seem to have been many), ignored its ukase and paid the fine instead. In England the fine was to be divided equally between the informer and the Government, and it was not unusual, when the executors made up their minds to defy the law, for one member of the family to inform, which in effect reduced the fine on the family to one-half the prescribed penalty.4 That may have been the reason why the Irish Act, passed 68 years after the English one, is silent on the disposition of the fine of five pounds imposed for breach of the law.

References :

1, Kirkpatrick: History of Dr. Steevens’ Hospital
2. Dublin Gazette, 15 Aug., 1730
3. Statute: 7 Geo.II, c.13
4. Tate: The Parish Chest.

An extract from an article titled “An Eighteenth Century Miscellany” written by Thomas King Moylan  and published in the Dublin Historical Record, Vol. X, No. 2. June-Aug 1948

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Research Help: Where Do Your Family Come From in Ireland?

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People ask me all the time where in Ireland their surname may be found.  A lot of these people, their ancestor/s left Ireland pre the ‘main’ famine time so they never think to look in records that we have which are for a time later than that famine period, and they should, they should particularly look at the distribution in the Griffiths Primary Valuation as per the examples I give below.

The thing is though, we have very few records which are pre 1840 BUT we do have a land survey taken in the 1840-60 time frame and while this record did NOT include a lot of people genealogists use it as a ‘surname locator’.  As a surname locator it is not perfect, but, it helps us work out places that we could be searching in for people of our surname.

It is reasonably easy to work with when you are looking for locations of a surname which is relatively uncommon in a county, even in the whole country but not much use if you are looking for an ‘O’Brien’ from somewhere in Ireland e.g. on looking for the surname O’Brien in all of Ireland I get a result of 10589 entries.  On looking for O’Brien in County Cork, I get a result of 1210 entries.  O’Brien in County Kilkenny gives me 32 entries (I am actually finding that figure unbelieveable!!).  Having given you these figures you can see the difference between O’Brien in a county and the surnames I am working with below.

Genealogists use the Griffiths Primary Valuation to source out areas in a county that a surname was found and from that they then decide which parish records they can check out.

I’m dealing specifically with Roman Catholic records here, for other religions we do not have as many parish records. I’m giving you two examples.  The first for a reasonably uncommon surname in one county (while over all of Ireland it is actually a common surname).  The second example is for a surname which is common in the county I have chosen. The first surname is ‘McNamara ‘ and the county is Roscommon.  I’m working that surname for a friend of mine who I told I would try to help her with her McNamara search a long time ago.  The second surname is Lyons and the county is Galway.  Galway is where my Lyons family came from (in the short term – we come from farther down the country at an earlier time)

Example 1 : McNamara, Roscommon

Griffiths Primary Valuation Search Page
http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml

I filled in only two boxes.
Family Name : McNamara
County: Roscommon

I left all other boxes empty and clicked search.
The result was 50 entries.

50 entries does not necessarily mean 50 different people. Some of these entries may have been for the same person leasing land with a house on it and leasing land with no house. Some of the entries may have been for a person who was leasing out the land to someone else. The names of the parishes which are given are civil parishes, *not* religious parishes.  The names of Roman Catholic parishes are different in a lot of instances to the names of the civil parishes.  So, you don’t look at the names of the people who were given, you look at the names of the parishes and we’ll say here that the McNamara family we are looking for were Catholic.  We need to look at the names of the civil parishes and then see first of all if there are Catholic parishes of the same name and it is with these that we begin our real search.

As you look down this list you will see the differences in spellings between the name of the civil parish and the name of the Roman Catholic parish.  You will see question marks showing those civil parishes I could not match up with a particular Roman Catholic parish.  Eventually it may turn out that I have to look at the locations of these civil parishes and see if I can match them with RC parishes in that area.  That’s a different days work after I have finished searching the parishes for which I have RC parish names.

Civil Parishes listed  vs Roman Catholic parish of same name

St. Peter : St. Peter’s & Drum (Athlone)
Kiltoom  : Kiltoom (Ballybay)
Fuerty  : Athleague & Fuerty
Termonbarry : Tarmonbarry
Kilgefin : ??? Kilkeevan (Castlerea)
Roscommon :: Roscommon & Kilteevan
Gran  :: ????
Drumatemple :: ?????
Ardcarn :: Ardcarne & Tumna (Cootehall)
Kilronan :: Kilronan (Arigna)
Killukin :: Killukin & Killumod (Croghan)
Ballintobber :: Ballintober & Ballymoe
Moore :: Moore
Estersnow :: ????
Clooncraff :: ????

Nancy had a John McNamara.  There were men called John listed in Killukin, Roscommon, Kilgefin, and Termonbarry, so that leaves us with four main parishes to begin searching in, I’m very glad that Nancy thinks that her McNamara family came from Roscommon and not just ‘somewhere’ in Ireland.  McNamara is a common enough surname and there were nearly 4000 entries in the Griffiths for that surname in all of Ireland

 Example 2: The surname Lyons in Galway county.(Galway city is not included in this search)

Griffiths Primary Valuation Search Page
http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml

I filled in only two boxes.
Family Name : Lyons
County: Galway (the City of Galway is not included in this search)

I left all other boxes empty and clicked search.
The result 247 entries.

You can immediately see the difference between the number of entries for McNamara in Roscommon  (50) and Lyons in Galway county (247).  A lot more work involved in sorting out the number of Roman Catholic parishes to be checked.  Note here though, Galway is a much bigger county than Roscommon having over 80 Roman Catholic parishes compared to 33 in Roscommon. So, entries for the surname Lyons in Galway are in the civil parishes of (and I have the name of the Roman Catholic parish listed beside the name of the civil parish below).

I have made one mistake when creating this table, I forgot to tell the table to show 100 entries so when you look at it it will show you only 10 entries.  Please click on the number you can see above the table and increase the number 10 to 100 if you want to see all the entries on the one page.

Civil Parish:Roman Catholic Parish
Abbeygormacan:Abbeygormican & Killoran
Addergoole:Addergoole & Kisleevy
Ahascragh:Ahascragh
Ardrahan:Ardrahan
Aughrim:Aughrim & Kilconnell
Ballymacward:Ballymacaward & Cloonkeenerril
Ballynakill:??Duniry & Ballynakill listed below
Boyounagh:Boyounagh
Claregalway:Claregalway
Clonbern:??
Clonfert:Clonfert
Clonkeen:???Cloonkeenerril above??
Clontuskert:Clontuskert
Duniry:Duniry & Ballinakill
Dunmore:Dunmore
Fohanagh:Fohenagh & Kilgerill
Inishcaltra:?????
Kilbennan:????
Kilcloony:????
Kilconickny:Kilconickney
Kilconla:???Donaghpatrick & Kilcloona
Kilconnell:???Kilconly & Kilbannon??
Kilcroan:???
Kilcummin:Oughterard (Kilcummin)
Kilgerrill:Fohenagh & Kilgerill
Kilkerrin:Kilkerrin & Clonberne
Killanin:Killanin (see also Oughterard)
Killeenadeema:???
Killererin:Killererin
Killeroran:???Killian & Cilleroran??
Killian:Killian & Cilleroran
Killimordaly:Killimordaly (Kiltullagh)
Killoran:???Killian & Cilleroran??
Killoscobe:Killascobe
Killosolan:???
Kilmeen:Kilmeen
Kilmorbologue:Killimorbologue
Kilquain:??
Kiltartan:??
Kilteskill:??
Kilthomas:Peterswell (Kilthomas)
Kiltormer:Kiltormer
Kiltullagh:Killimordaly (Kiltullagh)
Leitrim:??
Lickmolassy:??
Loughrea:Loughrea
Monivea:??
Moylough:Mounbellew (Moylough)
Moyrus:Moyrus
Oranmore:Oranmore (Kilcameen & Ballynacourty)
Templetogher:????
Tuam:Tuam
Tynagh:Tynagh
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Gravestones and a Bit, Irish Genealogy Summer School, University College Cork, June 29 – July 6, 2014

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That’s where I was this week, off at UCC, taking part in their Irish Genealogy Summer School and it was great.

On Tuesday, after I arrived a lady sat beside me and I asked if I could see her timetable so she loaned it to me.  I didn’t know who the man talking was.  Once I had checked the time table I gave it back to the lady I had borrowed it from and introduced myself and she immediately thanked me for everything I have done re gravestones.  That was really nice.

Later on when I was going to get my car two ladies helped me get out the gate (I was working the key the wrong way!)  As we walked down the road I chatted away to them and introduced myself and one of them got really excited because she said that one of the reasons she was doing the course was because I was going to be here!! That was also really nice to hear.

On Tuesday afternoon, I was introduced to John Nangle who was going to be part of the ‘tour of graveyards’ with me on Wednesday.  I’d never met John before, he’d talk  and I’d sit there with my mouth open fascinated.  The gravestones he sees are so totally different to the ones that I have seen.  By Wednesday evening we were sitting with his computer and he was showing me photographs of the stones he sees and I was saying to him, ‘Do you think that if I was looking at things like this I wouldn’t be photographing them?’  Absolutely incredible iconography, I have to go to Wexford to see these stones.  I really do.

Everything is Tuesday isn’t it :)  On Tuesday afternoon, Lorna Moloney who organises this conference realised that one of her speakers was not going to get there on Wednesday because of illness, so she asked me if I could give a talk in the morning.  She suggested that I could talk about the lecture I had given in Limerick earlier this month.  No problem said I.

The next morning though, when I was out and about taking photographs of churches, I said to myself, I’ll ask John if he will bring the instruments and show them to people in the theatre instead of in St. Mary’s in the afternoon.  I thought it was a great idea.  Asked him and he agreed and so it was the two of us ‘on stage’: I talked, he talked (I held up the instruments), we talked and then we talked some more – and the impression we got was that people were interested in what we were saying – so they told us.

At the Limerick conference, I talked about ‘the torch’ and what a difference it makes to reading the difficult gravestones. John announced he had a mirror and boy, I didn’t realise what a difference the mirror can make.  It is absolutely incredible.

Most gravestones face East so by the afternoon the sun is behind them and this can make reading the script on the stone very difficult.  The torch can make a difference, until Wednesday this week I was saying it made an incredible difference *but* the mirror is better, much better.

I had my camera set incorrectly, but the photographs do show you the difference to some extent.

I’ve mentioned ‘instruments’ above. John had brought a collection of the instruments or utensils that stone masons use to carve stones to show to the people at the conference and for me even that was very interesting.  I’d never seen them before.

It had been planned that we would visit about 4 graveyards in the afternoon, but time is a very short item at a day out like this and so we only managed to get to two.  St. Mary’s in Dungarvan and the Church of Ireland in Youghal.

I met so many people and made some new friends.  Eileen & Sean O’Dúill were there lecturing on Monday before I got there.  I never met Aiden Feerick before though I did know his name, he is so nice.  Ann Marie Coghlan and I had had a few words at the Limerick conference and it was she who ‘designed’ our graveyard day out and I got to know her much better.  Lorna, I’d only met once I think.  She’s just wonderful, absolutely wonderful.  Mary Beglan, I don’t think we’ve met since the Clare Roots Society Conference I gave a talk in back in 2011.  Dr. James (Jim) Ryan, I was just delighted to see him on Tuesday when I got down here because I didn’t think I knew anyone there.  He’s the man who has published all the individual county genealogy books : Flyleaf Press.  I can’t remember the last time I met Stephen Smyrl, ages ago before last Wednesday. Brian Donovan and Fiona Fitzsimons of Eneclann gave talks as well.  That must have been Tuesday, I heard Brian’s talk but not Fiona’s.  Brian did not mention any graveyard sites in his list of where to go on the internet :(

I’ve named the people I knew or who I met while at the conference.  There were other presentations as well, some talks I didn’t get to because all Tuesday afternoon we spent time talking about gravestones and how we were going to organise our day out on the Wednesday and then I left after lunch on Thursday.  Ann Marie had the graveyard list, so John herself and myself sat all afternoon in the kitchen of one of the apartments talking about that.  Also at the conference there was Kyle J. Betit over from the US, Sean Murphy, Dr. Paul MacCotter, Regina Sexton, Nicola Morris, Stuart Rosenblatt, Dr. Dagmar Ó Riain-Raedel, Dr. David Butler, Rosaleen Underwood, Maeve Mullin and Hilary McDonagh & Dave Enright.

Overall, a very good collection of extremely knowledgeable academics & genealogists.

The speakers for next years conference have pretty much been decided on already. John and myself will once again be ‘doing’ graveyards and I am already so looking forward to it.

A note – added 6th July.  I’ve received copies of some photos from Aidan and one of them shows me shining the torch on script whilst another shows John reflecting light on the script and I am including them here.

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Old Irish Newspaper Abstracts

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We do have some old newspaper abstracts on this website (which can be found here) and I always remember one day as I was copying some material in the National Library in Dublin laughing to myself because life had not changed that much.  The bit I was transcribing was advising people to take their keys out of their front doors because thieves were just able to walk into houses.  The thing is, the paper had been published in the 1830’s, and then it was about 2006, and only that week my mother had begun to bring her car key into the house at night instead of leaving it sitting in the car.  My mother was a medical Doctor and getting called out at night was a regular thing so leaving her key in the car saved her the trouble of having to look for it when called out.

Ireland Old News – a newspaper site giving ‘abstracts’ from Old Irish Newspapers. Came across this website earlier today (I had forgotten it!)  and I am or was the 399248th visitor since the year 2000.

Ireland Old News

We tend to forget the things that so many people have done, especially in this day and age of advanced technology.  Many of you don’t remember the days when the Irish Census returns were not on the internet, many of you don’t know about the days when you had to go to the Irish Civil Records office to get the references for births, marriages and deaths.  Today, we can get those references if they exist on the internet (for the most part).  We all forget so easily about how it was so hard back then and about what we owe to the dedicated people who transcribed material and put it up on the net for the rest of us to see.

Ireland Old News contributors:
Cathy Joynt Labath who I believe did most of the transcribing and who created the website.
Jim McNamara (and I think he told me recently it was 1999 we first met) and
Brian Magaoidh who I am still in contact with.
Alison & Kathryn who I knew through lists.
Dennis Ahearne (RIP) who contributed so much to people researching their Irish ancestry.

Some examples of the earliest years covered for any county – extracts from other newspapers are included on the site, I’ve just taken the first extract for any county as an example.

The Armagh Guardian, Dec 3rd, 1844
Cavan Herald, July 14, 1818
Ennis Chronicle (Co. Clare), 1793
Corke Journal, 1756
Londonderry Journal (Derry) 1772
Ballyshannon Herald 1832 (Donegal)
Dublin 1705
The Enniskillen Chronicle & Erne Packet 1813 (Fermanagh) Connaught Journal, Galway 1823
The Kerry Examiner, 1847
The Kildare Observer 1915
The Kilkenny Independent 1826
The Leitrim Journal & Carrick-on-Shannon Advertiser 1868 The Limerick Chronicle 1769
The Drogheda Conservative, or Meath, Louth, Monaghan and Cavan Advertser 1837
The Ballina Chronicle, 1849 (Mayo)
The Meath Chronicle 1899
The Northern Standard, & Monaghan, Cavan and Armagh Advertiser 1839
The Midland Tribune, 1901 (Offaly/King’s Co.)
Roscommon & Leitrim Gazette,, 1822
Sligo Champion, 1887
The Clonmel Advertiser, 1818 (Tipperary)
The Strabane Morning Post, 1812 (Tyrone)
Jackson’s Oxford Journal 1804 (Waterford)
Belfast Newsletter (Antrim & Down) 1749
The Bray & South Dublin Herald, 1916 (Wicklow)
The Newry Commercial Telegraph, 1813 (Co. Down)

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Dr. Jane Lyons

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Name: Jane Lyons (O’Brien was my married name)

1981 B.Sc. – University College Cork
1991: Ph. D. – University College Cork
1993: Dip. Environmental Engineering – Trinity College, Dublin.

I live in Ireland. This basic curriculum vitae is being put on From-Ireland.net in June 2014; the figures given here will change in time.

November 2013. Created a Company called Trace your Irish Ancestors Ltd.

1996 I began transcribing gravestones in the Co. Laois(Queen’s Co.) and Kilkenny area.

2001 created and put a web site on the net called from-ireland – gets approx. 1,000 visitors per day

2001 created an Irish Genealogy mail list on Yahoo called Y-IRL – currently (in theory) has 2218 members

2011 : Gave a talk on gravestones at the Clare Roots Society Genealogy Conference

2012 put 18,000 Church and gravestone photographs on the net – the number has been increased to 20,000

2014 : Beyond the Grave conference, Limerick. Dr. Jane Lyons Gravestone presentation

2 July 2014 : Irish Genealogy Summer School, University College Cork :

Attached to my Jane Lyons Genealogy page is another Facebook page ‘Irish Genealogy’ which has 3869 likes

I am a member of the following Facebook pages
Kilkenny Down memory Lane
The country Church
The Country Castle
The Country House
and finally
Loreto Convent Kilkenny, past pupils

Outside of my work on gravestones, my website, my mail list and my involvement with groups on the net there is not a lot I can say about myself.

I have been described as a Pioneer in gravestone recording by Mr. John Tierney of historicgraves . My link is to his words, but, it is a site that any of you interested in Irish gravestones should visit.

The number of page views on this web site over the last 7 days are as follows:

Sun, 1 Jun 2014      2,651
Mon, 2 Jun 2014     1,930
Tue, 3 Jun 2014      2,067
Wed, 4 Jun 2014     2,002
Thu, 5 Jun 2014      1,837
Fri, 6 Jun 2014        2,254
Sat, 7 Jun 2014       2,143

PREVIOUS WORK EXPERIENCE

Up to 2001 Research Associate & Lecturer in Marine
M.Sc.Environmental Science (Applied Science) on
Environmental Impact Assessment at the Zoology Dept., U.C.D.

September -October 1997 Contracted by Natural Environmental Consultants to
carry out an Environmental Impact Assessment of the outer Malahide estuary in relation to an upgrading of the Malahide Sewage Treatment Plant.
Client: Fingal Co. Council

Sept. 1993 – August 1997 Research Associate & Lecturer in Marine
Biology to B.Sc. and M.Sc.Environmental Science (Applied Science) on Environmental Impact Assessment at the Zoology Dept., U.C.D.

June 1997 – October 1997 Contracted by John Barnett & Associates Ltd., to carry
out an Environmental Impact Assessment in relation to construction of a jetty on the marine environment in the locality of the Murrough, Co. Wicklow.

Aug. 1996 -August 1997 Contracted by M.C. O’Sullivan and Cowi International
(Denmark) to carry out an EIS on Rogerstown Estuary in relation to Balleally landfill located on the inner estuary.
Client: Fingal Co. Council
Oct. 1996 – Jan. 1997 Contracted to identify the Amphipoda of the
Irish Lagoon Survey by Dr. B. Healy.
Client: Office of Public Works.

Jan/July 1996 Environmental Audit of Booterstown Marsh
Client: Birdwatch Ireland

1995 Marine Consultant attending the Northern Cross
(Motorway) Enquiry
Nov/Dec 1994: Benthic survey of the fauna at Howth, Co. Dublin, on behalf of M.C. O’Sullivan, Consulting Engineers,
Dublin.
Client: Dublin Co. Council

Aug/Nov 1994: Biological survey of the rivers Mayne and
Sluice and Baldoyle Estuary in North Co. Dublin, on behalf of M.C.O’Sullivan, Consulting Engineers, Dublin.
Client: Dublin Co. Council

Aug/Dec. 1993: Marine Research Unit, U.C.D. – Environmental Impact
Assessment of the proposed Northern motorway on the inner Malahide Estuary .
Client: Parks Dept., Fingal Co. Council.

March 1992: Praeger Institute Award Recipient (R.I.A.).

 

REPORTS
1. O’Brien, Jane, Geoff Oliver and Brenda Healy 1997
Outer Malahide Estuary: Environmental Impact Assessment – Malahide Sewage Treatment Plant Extension
Contractor: Natural Environmental Consultants
Client: Fingal Co. Council
2. O’Brien, Jane. 1997
The Murrough: assessment of Marine Environment.
Contractor: John Barnett & Associates Ltd., Chartered Mineral Surveyors, Environmental Planning and Geotechnical Consultants.
3. Jane O’Brien & Mary O’Neill: 1997
Rogerstown Estuary: Environmental Impact Analysis – in relation to Baleally Landfill
Contractor: M.C. O’Sullivan & Cowi International
Client: Fingal Co. Council
4. Mary O’Neill & Jane O’Brien 1996
Environmental Audit: Biological Status Booterstown Marsh, Co. Dublin
Client: South Dublin Branch: Birdwatch Ireland
5. Jane O’Brien,1995
Report to Royal Irish Academy on the amphipod fauna
of Carnsore Point, Co. Wexford with particular reference to the ecology of Hyale nilssoni and H. stebbingi

6. Jane O’Brien, Dec. 1994
Howth Outfall: Howth Environmental Study: Benthic Analysis. Fauna and Sediments.
Contractor: M.C. O’Sullivan & Co. Ltd., Consulting Engineers.
Client: Dublin Co. Council
7. Jane O’Brien, Mary Kelly-Quinn and Janet Khan, Nov.1994
A Biological Survey of the Baldoyle Estuary, Burrow Beach and the Rivers Mayne and
Sluice.
Contractor: M.C. O’Sullivan & Co. Ltd., Consulting Engineers.
Client : Dublin Co. Council
8. Brenda Healy, Paul Galvin and Jane Lyons 1993
Environmental Impact Survey : Aquatic Fauna of the Inner Malahide Estuary.
Client: Parks Dept., Fingal Co. Council

 

PUBLICATIONS

1. Jane O’Brien, 1996
The status of the Whelk Fishery in Ireland.Paper presented at the 1996
Environmental Scientists Colloquium. Abs. only.
2. Jane Lyons and A.A. Myers, 1993
Amphipoda Gammaridea from coral rubble in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea:
Families Megaluropidae, Melitidae, Phliantidae, Phoxocephalidae and
Urothoidae. Jour. Nat. Hist., 1993, 27:575-598
3. Jane Lyons and A.A. Myers, 1991
Amphipoda Gammaridea from coral rubble in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea:
Families Dexaminidae, Eusiridae, Isaeidae, Ischyroceridae, Leucothoidae,
Liljeborgiidae and Lysianassidae. Jour. Nat. Hist., 1991, 25:597-621
4. Jane Lyons and A.A. Myers, 1990
Amphipoda Gammaridea from coral rubble in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea: Families Acanthonotozomatidae, Ampeliscidae, Ampithoidae, Anamixidae, Aoridae and Colomastigidae. Jour. Nat. Hist., 1990, 24: 1197-1225
5. Myers, A.A. & Lyons, J. 1987
A re-evaluation of the South African species of Lemboides Stebbing and
Lembos Bate (Amphipoda, Aoridae) described by K.H.. Barnard 1916. Ann. S.
A. Mus. V97, Pt. 9 1987: 267-282, 9 figs
Curriculum Vitae Dr. Jane O’Brien
_____________________________________________________________________
2 of 4

 

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Armagh Plantations, Aghivillan and Brochus Manors, 1622

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(6) Manor of Aghivillan and Brochus (2,000 acres).

Granted to John Heron July 23 (??? ) and omitted by Carew. We have no knowledge of events on the lands comprising the above two proportions previous to 1619. In that year Pynnar found that two small bawns of earth with a pallazado upon them and a ditch about them had been built and near to each a number of houses inhabited with English tenants, 13 families in all able to make 26 men with arms.

John Heron died August 1, 1616, and was succeeded by his brother Sir Edward Heron, who joined with his younger brother William in selling the lands to John Dillon March 25, 1620, (Inquisitions of Ulster, Armagh, 5 Car. I), at which time a mansion house of stone and lime 60 feet by 20 feet had been. erected in the townland of Ballenraye by John Dillon and the assigns of John Heron.

The Survey of 1622 shows “Sir John Dillon” (1) in occupation and states – there was then only “one convenient dwelling house of timber rough cast with lime wherein himself and wife with their family do now inhabit” and that there was “no bawne about it.” Leaseholders and cottagers on the lands then totalled 42, but none confirmed in their holdings; 18 Irish families were resident on the two proportions.

By 1630 these lands had passed either by purchase or forfeiture to a “Mr Waldron” who figures in a Muster Roll attributed to that year.(2) There were then 45 tenants on the property capable of bearing arms. That is the earliest reference we have to Waldron’s connection with the manor. He is said to have been of the same stock as Sir Richard Waldron who received a grant in 1610 of 1,000 acres in Co. Cavan.

From a Subsidy Roll of 1634 we learn that John Waldron was then in occupation. Two years later, May 20, 1636, we find that he and his son William had been “admitted into the number of Planters in Ireland.”(3) Besides William above he had a son George of whom later and a daughter Elizabeth who married John Obins of the Manor of Ballevoran and was left a widow by his death April 15, 1635.

John Waldron sometime during the reign of Charles I acquired half of the adjoining Manor of Shanagoolan.(4) He seems to have been dead before 1641. A deposition relative to affairs in that neighbourhood made September 3, 1642, by Mrs. Jane Grace mentions Mr. Waldron and his brothers whose Christian names she “knew not.” Mrs. C. Stanhawe, relict of his neighbour Henry Stanhawe, in her account of July 23, 1642, records “a guard of 100 men on Mr. Waldron’s house,” the “Mr.” in this case being the son William.

A “Mr. Waldron, gent.” figures in the Poll Tax or Census of 1659, presumably William above. From other sources we know that William must have died previous to 1676 but that George was still alive in 1678(5)

William married and had a son William who must have died young, and a daughter Elizabeth who married Gilbert Thacker of Repton in Derbyshire, by whom she had a daughter Jane Thacker, the ultimate heir to the Waldron estate in Co. Armagh.

Jane Thacker was a considerable heiress, having inherited a large fortune from her father as well. She married firstly the Honble. Charles Wottop alias Stanhope, son of Philip, 2nd Earl of Chesterfield, and following his death in 1703 she married secondly Thomas Stanhope of Elvaston, Derbyshire, of the branch of the Stanhopes now represented by the Earl of Harrington. He predeceased her in 1735. She died 1744. There were no children by either marriage so the Armagh property was sold by her trustees, in 1706, to Arthur Brownlow of Lurgan who, by his will dated September 29, 1710, bequeathed it with his Manor of Brownlowsderry and other lands in theseveral counties of Armagh and Monaghan to his son William, thus increasing the, Brownlow lands by another 2,000 acres. One of the parties to, the sale was a Francis Stonard Waldron of Knole Hill, Essex, probably a descendant of the John Waldron of 1630, but of whom we have no further information.

from from “County Armagh In 1622 A Plantation Survey”
Edited byT. G. F. PATERSON, M.A., M.R.I.A. published in Seanchás Ardmhaca

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Muster List, Kilkenny City, 1685

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The following names have been extracted from a paper published in the “Proceedings and Transactions of the Kilkenny and the South-East of Ireland Archaeological Society” Vol 3. 1855. pp. 231-274

The article was written by John G. A. Prim.

Under  Captain King in 1685

Name Surname
Ri…. ??
Jo. Barry
Alexander Beane
Willm Beane
Edward Blurton Sen
Thomas Brenan
Edward Brenan
Alexander Burnett
John Byrne
Hugh Chitters
Thomas Chitters gone
James Connell
James Connell
Denne Cooper
Arthur Cornes
John Davis
Michael Davis
Ralph Davis Sen
Ralph Davis Jun
Philip Deane Serjts
George Desbrough Corpls
Willm Deveerd
George Dongon
Willm Dongon
Samuel Dowler
John Dowler
Thomas Evans
Henry ffarrell
Walter ffibbs
John ffillpott
James fflanagan
Willm fflanaghane
Bryan ffolerton
Owen ffolerton
Thomas Gale
Thomas Glin
John Glover
Edward Goddard Serjts
Edward Goddard Jun
Bryan Gormoyle
Charles Gosling Ensigne
Willm Gowane
Willm Grantham
John Griffin
Mathew Griffith Drumers
Edward Hamilton gone
Nicholas Harding
Thomas Hart Lt.
Henry Heard
Teige Higgane Drumers
Hugh Hill
Willm Jackson
Ralph Jackson
John Jones
Edward Jones
Tyronne Kelly
John King Capt.
Abraham King
Samuel Lake
Teige Lapp
Thomas Lee
Edward Leith gone
John Lloyd
Wilm Locksmyth Corpls
Patrick Markeney
Bryan McDermott roe
Hugh McDonnogh
Tyrence McDonnogh
John McHenry
Potter Medloe
John Morgan
John Morry
James Morry
John Morry
John Morry
Thomas Mosse Corpls
Roger Mulroony Jun
James Neylane
John Norry NOTE No John Norry listed, there is a John Morry
Daniel O’Doherty Pike of Thomas Parker was given to Daniel O’Doherty
Willm O’Donnell
Manus O’Gaffe
Donogh O’Learaghan
Thomas Parkens NOTE No Thomas Parkens listed but there is a Thomas Parker
Thomas Parker
Tho Prise
John Reeves gone
John Reynolds
Richard Richardson
John Rise
John Saint Sen
John Saint Jun
James Sanotson
James Sheely
Thomas Shelton
Robert Shepard Jun
Robert Shepard
John Shepard
John Shore
Bryan Smyth
Michael Sparkes
Robert Steevans
Humphrey Thomas
Philip Tweed Sen
Philip Tweed Jun
Richard Warren
Thomas Watts
William West
Richard Whitmore
Robert Wilson
Thomas Witch
Nicholas Wood
Noble Wright

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Muster List, Kilkenny City, 1667

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The following names have been extracted from a paper published in the “Proceedings and Transactions of the Kilkenny and the South-East of Ireland Archaeological Society” Vol 3. 1855. pp. 231-274

The article was written by John G. A. Prim.

The following is a list of men ‘mustered’ at St. Kenny’s Butts, April 8th, 1667.
All spellings of names are as they were listed in the document.  in such cases as a different spelling was given for a name I have listed this spelling in brackets on the line relating to the man. I have also sorted the list of surname alphabetically.

It must be noted that at that date in time only Protestant Citizens were ‘qualified’ to serve, as Roman Catholics did not take the oath of supremacy, without which, no one could under the then existing law, serve the State.

Peter Hilton was unable to serve because he was ‘in prison”
Robert Wilkinson, John Pape, ffrancis Harris, William Heyes and Davyd Rice ‘came late’
William Walters was represented by his son
Jacob Carnockes was represented by his servant
Richard Daniells also sent his servant who was marked ‘Papist’.

A third muster roll shows the Militia Medical Officer Mr. Tho. Bond, Chyrurgeon.

Name Surname Note/Year
John Ablewitt
John Allen
William Ayers
Michael Badge Sheriff 1664, 1665
Benjam Barton
Ralph Bayley
Bray Beaver
William Beaver Member of Merchant’s Guild at this time
John Beavere Cromwellian settler in Kilkenny. Member of the Merchant’s Guild (Beavor or Beaver)
Willm Bennet
Christopher Berry
Peeter Blacknall
Christopher Blott Sergt Sheriff 1668
Overington Blunden Cromwellian Adventurer – received grant of Clonmorne forfeited by Helias Shee
Nathaniell Bolster
Thomas Boshell
ffrancis Bradish Portreve Irishtown 1667
Joseph Brenane
Robt Broes
Richard Browne
Willm Burch Sheriff 1665. Portreve Irishtown 1668
Willm Burgesse Capt
John Burgesse taylor
George Burgesse
Edward Bustian Corporll
John Caddan Drumr
Thomas Campion
John Chamberlin
William Chapman
Thomas Chapman Sheriff 1658
Rich Clarke
Thomas Collins
John Collyns
Thomas Cone
William Connell Sheriff
  1. Mayor 1672
Willm Connell, Junr
Barthol Connor Sheriff 1664 & 1665.  Portreve Irishtown 1671 Mayor 1682
Thady Coogan
Tho: Cooksey Sheriff 1668
Thomas Cooksey
Henry Cookson member of Corporation Elected Sheriff 1671 but did not attend to be sworn into office
Richd Core
Jacob Cornocke
Ralph Coward
Mathew Crowe
Richd Danniell Sheriff, 1656
John Date Sergt Sheriff 1675
Tho Davijs *****a Thomas Davis of the Kilkenny Excise office struck a toekn about this time BUT 4 persons of that name on this muster roll
John Davys Sheriff , 1693, 1694 1693, 1694 (Davis)
Thomas Davys
Tho Davys
Willm Davys Sheriff 1676 & 1685.  Portreve Irishtown 1661 & 1665. (Davis)
Tho Davys taylor
Henery Dowson Drumr
Nicholas Doyle
Edward Dubberly
Charles Duke
Tho Dullard
John Dyan
Tho Edmonds
Evans Sheriff 1667 Mayor
Thomas Evans Mayor this year Chief Magistrate 1659, 1660, 1666, 1667 & 1668
Tho ffag
Nicholas ffarie
William ffletcher
Robt ffloyd
John ffollows
Thomas Foart
Edward Goddart
Thomas Golborne
Peeter Goodwin Sheriff, 1657 Mayor 1664, 1665
Myler Goodwin
Oudam Gourden
Allexander Gourdon
Daniell Grady
Christopher Greaves
George Grifith
Richd Grymes
Nicholas Halfpenny Portreve Irishtown, 1662
ffrancis Hamlin
ffrancis Harris
William Hart
Stephen Hassard
Adam Haydocke Sheriff 1667 (Haydock)
Josias Haydocke Ensigne Sheriff, 1659.  Mayor 1673, 1674, 1675 & 1701
Arthur Helsham Capt of foot in Cromwel’s army. Received a grant of land at Leggetsrath Mayor 1679 – year he died
Phillip Henderson
Thomas Heyden
Willm Heyes
Thomas Heyes
Edwd Hicks Sheriff 1666
Christopher Hill
Peeter Hilton
Gameliel Holden
John Horsley Corporll
Richd Inwood Innkeeper, Sheriff 1671 Coroner, 1672
Garrat Jacob Corporll
John Joly French Protestant settler His son Edward Jollie Sheriff 1752
Richd Jones
Willm Keast
Willm Kymberlin Joint Sheriff , 1669 Portreve of Irishtwn 1672, 1673 (Kimberley)
John Kyrke
Hugh Langam
William Laugharne
William Lawler
Nathan Lodge
Tho Lyon
William Marwood
ffrancis Mitchel
John Morgan
Richd Mukin
David Murphy
Ebenezer Mylam
John Neale
Thomas Norris Sheriff 1679
Richd Nowlan
George Oliver Sheriff 1666
John Pape Sheriff , 1677, 16788 Mayor 1696
Thomas Parkin
Walter Peart
Nicholas Pharey
Richd Phillips Sheriff , 1709
Sam Phillips Sergt Sheriff 1662, Mayor 1681
Antho Phillips
John Phillips Sheriff, 1660
John Plumer
Willm Plym
Thomas Pollardt
Richd Prat
Tho Price
Tho: Read
Joseph Read
Valentine Reed Leift Sheriff 1656
David Rice
Tho Richards
Willm Robinson
James Robinson
Robt Rose Joint Sheriff , 1669 with Kymberlin
ffrancis Rowlidge Sheriff
  1. Portreve Irishtown 1663.  Mayor 1676 & 1677
John Sandford
John Sayers
Robt Scarbrough Portreve Irishtown 1680
Richd Sergeant
Willm Sewell Warden of the Guild of Shoemakery Guild of Butchers at this time
John Sharpe
Willm Smith
James Syncock, Junr.
James Synocke, Senr. Sheriff, 1667 (Sinock)
Thomas Talbot Keeper of a wine tavern
Jeptha Tovey Sergt Sheriff 1670
James Tovey Sheriff, 1672 Portreve Irishtown 1669, 1674 & 1675
Willm Tydmarsh
Willm Veike
John Wall
Willm Walters
Willm Walters
John White
Henry White
Joseph Whitle son to Job Whittle, soldier in Cromwellian army
John Whittle Sheriff part of 1664.  Coroner 1665
George Wilkinson Sheriff , 1673, 1674
Randle Wilkinson
Tho Wilkinson
Richd Wilkinson
Walter Williams
Williams Smith
Robt Wilson
Tho Woodward
Cornelius Wright Sheriff , 1661 (Wright or Right)
Thomas Yong Sheriff , 1673, 1674 Mayor 1679 (Young)
Henery Yonge Corporll
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Dublin Street Names Explained and Civil Parishes

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Over the years I have always wondered how on earth do researchers manage to work out which parish was the street their ancestors lived on, how do they know which set of parish records to look at.  This was one of the things I thought of also when I realised that my 1834 Dublin Directory gives me the names of the Civil parishes that streets are in.

I have many books and one of these is “Dublin Street Names, Dated and Explained” by the Rev. C. T. M’Cready, D.D., Curate of S.  Audoen’s, and minor Canon of S. PAtrick’s Cathedral, Dublin.  “History in Names”.  First published in 1892.

This morning, as I sat looking for church photographs in my files, I picked up my copy of this book and decided I would begin scanning it to put on the net, then, after I had begun I checked the net to see if a copy was already online and yes, it is there.  Personally I’m not mad about the small versions of books we have to read when we read them online, so I decided I would continue with my scanning and editing my work.  THEN, I thought – Hey, Jane, how about you scan these pages and then edit them by putting in the name of the Civil parish that the street is in when it is listed in your 1834 directory?”

The result will help the researchers work out the name of the civil parish the street was in and from there they can work out the religious parish.

This is going to take some time to complete and as you can imagine the streets whose names begin with A section is only a few pages long, but, for the moment I am going to do this on a letter by letter basis.  The creation of each section is time consuming as is everything else.  Hopefully, the finished product will help someone.

Dublin Street Names Explained with names of Civil parishes

EXPLANATION OF ABBREVIATIONs:
al. = alley.
ave. = avenue.
br. = bridge.
ct. = court.
la. = lane.
lr. = lower.
mkt. = market.
par. = parade.
pk. = park.
pl. = place.
qu. = quay.
rd. = road.
sq. = square.
str. = street.
ter. = terrace.
yd.
= yard.

A.D.C. = Artisans’ Dwellings Co.
D. K. R. = Deputy Keeper’s Report.
G. C. D. = Gilbert’s Calendar of Dublin.
G.H D. = Gilbert’s History of Dublin.
L. L. = Lord Lieutenant.
L. M. = Lord Mayor.
Cf. = confer (compare).

l.C. = loco citato (in the place last cited).
q.v.= quod vide (which see).
cr.= created.

DUBLIN STREET NAMES
DATED AND EXPLAINED

I have separated out the script for each street, underneath the details about the street I have filled in the name of the Civil parish in 1834.  In those instances where the street is not mentioned in the 1834 Directory then I have placed two asterisk.

A STREETS:

Abbey-str. 1728. -lr. -up. 1834. -mid. 1846. -old, 1836.
From S. Mary’s Abbey, q. v.
Parish 1834 according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834
Saint Mary 1-62 & 93-150 inclusive
Saint Thomas 63-92 inclusive

Abercorn-rd. (North Lots.) 1868. –ter. (N. C. R.) 1869.**
From the Duke of Abercorn, L.L. 1866-68, 1874-76.

Aberdeen-str. (Infirmary-rd.) 1886; -ter. 1888.**
From the Earl of Aberdeen, L.L. 1886.
The name was given to the street by the Artizans Dwellings Company, at whose request His Excellency opened the block of buildings containing it.

Adair-la. (Aston’s-qu.) 1840.

Adam-ct. (Grafton-str.) 1814.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Anne

Adam and Eve-la. (Merchants’-qu.) 1766.
From a tavern, with the sign of Adam and Eve?
The Franciscan Church (built on the site of the lane) is often (as in the Directory for 1891) popularly called Adam and Eve Chapel.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Michael

Adelaide-pl. (Baggot-str. lr.) 1840.**

Adelaide-rd. (S. C. R.) 1833.
From Queen Adelaide, 1792-1849, wife (1818-37) of Wm. IV. Called Old Circular-rd. in map of 1800.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Peter

Albert-ct., -pl. (Grand Canal-str.) 1842.**
From Prince Albert, who in 1840 m. Queen Victoria. Formerly called Moira-ct., -pl.

For Albert-qu. see Quays.**

Aldborough-ct., -pl.(North-strand.) 1800. ,
From its proximity to Aldborough House, erectedin 1796, at a cost of £40,000, by Viscount Aldborough, cr. Earl of Aldborough and Viscount Amiens in 1777. (Cf. Amiens-str.)
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Thomas

Alexandra-pl. (North-strand.) 1865. -ter. (S. C. R) 1871.**
From Alexandra, who in 1863 became Princess of Wales

Allen’s-ct. (Mullinahack.) 1789. (Gilb. Hist. Dubl., i. 353-4.) From Viscount Allen (cr. 1717), whose town residence was situated here.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Catherine

Allen’s-yd. (S. Kevin-str.) 1766. **

Alphonsus (S.)-rd. See S. Alphonsus-rd. **

Amiens-str. (Talbot-str.) 1800.
From Viscount Amiens. cr. Earl of Aldborough in 1777, who erected the neighbouring Aldborough House, now a military barrack. (See above.)
In 1728 this thoroughfare was called the Strand, -and in 1800 the name Amiens-str. was borne only by the eastern end of Gloucester-str. N. In a map of 1829, the name is found transferred to the thoroughfare which bears it now.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Thomas

Anderson’s-ct. (Greek-str.) 1756.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Michan

Andrew (S.)-str., -la. See S. Andrew-str., -la.**

Angel-alley, -ct. (High-str.) 1766.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Nicholas, within

Anglesea-market. (Little-green-str.) 1834. -row.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Michan

Anglesea-st. (Dame-str.) 1728.
From Arthur Annesley,-cr. 1661, Earl of Anglesey,–who in 1657-62 took from the Corporation the land extending backwards from his house in College-gr. to the Liffey. (Gilb. Hist. Dubl., i. 321.)
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Andrew

Anne-str. N. (King-str. N.) 1756.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Michan

Anne-str. N.E. (N. C. R.) 1818.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint George

Anne (S.)-str. S. See S. Anne-str.**

Annesley-br., -pl. See under Bridges (Tolka).
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :Saint Anne

Appian-way, the. (Leeson-park.) 1846.**
From the famous Roman-rd., called the Appian-way from Claudius Appius Caecus, by whom it was made 313 B.B.
It was probably thus designated by Mr. Samuel Roberts, a builder, who lived here. It had been called in 1845 Tivoli-ave.,-Tivoli being the residence there of Francis Morgan, esq.

Arbour-hill. (Stoneybatter.) 1603. (‘Earber-hill.’)
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Paul

Arbutus-pl. (Lombard-str. W.) 1887.**

Arcade, the Royal. See Royal-arcade.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Andrew

Archdall’s-row. (Temple-bar.) 1766.**

Ardee-str. (Coombe.) 1792. -row.
From Sir Edward Brabazon, knight, cr. Baron Ardee, 1616, whose son, Sir William, was cr. Earl of Meath, 1627.
Cf. the streets called Reginald, Brabazon, Earl, and Meath, in the same neighbourhood. (Cf. also Earl-str. N., q.v.) To Wm. Brabazon, ancestor of the Earls of Meath, the. Abbey of S. Thomas the Martyr (hence the neighbouring S. Thomas-str., q.v.) was granted in 1545.
Formerly called Crooked-staff.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Luke 1-15 inclusive
Saint Catherine 19-28 inclusive
The above numbers as given with no mention of No’s 16-18

Ardilaun-ter. (N. C. R.) 1881. **
From (Sir Arthur E. Guinness, bart.) Lord Ardilaun, cr. a Baron, 1880.
Ardilaun (Ardillaun) is the name of an island in Lough Corrib, at Cong, near Lord Ardilaun’s residence.

Armstrong-str. (Harold’s Cross-rd.) 1885.**
From Richard Owen Armstrong, esq., one of the Directors of the A. D. C., by whom this name was given.

Arnott-str;. (S. C. R.) 1873.**
From Sir John Arnott, knighted 1859. He and Mr. Lombard and Mr. MacMahon purchased property here, where three streets were called after their several names.

Arran-br., -quay. See under Bridges (Queen’s-br.) and Quays.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Michan 1-20 inclusive
Saint Paul 22-44 inclusive

Arran-str. [E.] (Ormond-qu. up.) 1728.
The northern part was formerly Boot-la., q.v.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Michan

Arran-str. W. (Arran-qu.) 1756. ·la:. 1756. **

Arranmore-ave., otero (N. C. R.) 1880. **

Arthur’s-la. (Golden-la.) **
From Sir Thos. Arthur, lessee from the Earl of Longford, of the Whitefriars estate.
Called Maiden-la., 1766.

Artichoke-rd. 1832. **
Now called Grand Canal-str. up. and Shelbourne-rd.
Arundel-ct. (S. Nicholas-str.) 1709. (Gilb. Hist. Dubl., i. 191.) From Robert Arundel, who rented ground here from the Corporation.
It was subsequently known as the City-market and Black-hall-market. It is now known as S. Nicholas-pl.

Asdill’s-row. (Crampton-qu.) 1822.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Andrew

Ash-str. (Coombe.) 1735.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Nicholas, without

Ashbrook-ter. (S. C. R.) 1846. Aston’s-Pl. (Aston’s-qu.) 1885.**

From the adjoining Aston’s-qu., which see, under Quays.
Formerly called Lee’s-la., q.v.

Atkinson’s-al1ey. (Coombe.) 1756.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Luke

Auburn-hill (Aughrim-str.) 1875. -str. (Shamrock-str.) 1878.
From Auburn, the name of Goldsmith’s Deserted Village, Cf. Goldsmith-str.-but not Oliver’s-alley.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Grangegorman

Audoen’s (S.)-arch. See S. Audoen’s-arch.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Audeon

Aughrim-str. (N. C. R.) 1792.
From Aughrim in Co. Galway, the scene of a battle in 1691,-the name being given to the street probably as a centennial memorial.
Previously this thoroughfare formed the Sth. end of Black-horse-la.
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Grangegorman

Aungier-str. (S. Stephen-str.) 1670. -ct. 1766. -pl.
From Sir Fras. Aungier, Master of the Rolls, who became Baron Aungier in 1621. His dau. Alice m., 4 Jan., 165 5/6, Sir Jas. Cuffe, Knt., M.P. (Cr. the neighbouring Cuffe-str.)
Civil Parish according to Almanack Registry Directory 1834 :
Saint Peter

Austin’s-ct.**
1. (Church-str.) 1840. From the Augustinians here?
Formerly Field’s-court, W.
2. (S. Andrew’s-la.) From Geo. Austin, T. C.

Avondale-rd. (N. C. R.) 1882.**
From Avondale, Co. Wicklow, the residence of C. S. Parnell, M.P.

Ayre’s-ct. (Purdon-str.) 1840. **

to be continued

 

 

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